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Policy Responses to Rapidly Transforming
Midstream Value Chain Segments in Africa:
The Case of Millet Sector in Senegal
Ge...
Introduction
• Objective
• Assess the policy responses to Africa’s rapidly emerging traditional staples value
chains
• Spe...
The importance of millet in Senegal’s cereal sector
Figure 7.1—The Importance of Millet in Senegalese Cereal
Value chains
Competitiveness of millet and non-millet industries
Figure 7.2.– Four-Firm Concentration Ratios in All Cereal and
Millet I...
• Implications
• Declining profit that
may lead to collapse
• The need for strong
and targeted public
supports
• Innovatio...
Indicators
Wholesalers
(WS)
Primary
processors
(PP)
Secondary
processors
(SP)
Retailers
(RT)
Percentage female owners 0.0 ...
• The three I’s of public interventions for industrial development
• Infrastructural
• Institutions
• Incentives
• We spec...
Insufficient access to institutional supports
Wholesalers
Primary
processors
Secondary
processors Retailers All
Sample siz...
• Results of econometrics analysis indicate that
• Female owners have lower probability of receiving trainings than males
...
• The impacts of the supports were measured on
• Secondary processers’ capacity level and growth rate
• Trainings appears ...
• Policy interventions need to reflect the transformation trajectory
• For emerging traditional staples, focus on competit...
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2020 ReSAKSS Annual Conference - Plenary Session IV–Policies for Inclusive Development of Modern Food Value Chains

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Presentation on "Policy Responses to Rapidly Transforming Midstream Value Chain Segments in Africa:​ The Case of Millet Sector in Senegal" by Dr. Getaw Tadesse, Director of Bilateral Programs at AKADEMIYA2063

Publié dans : Économie & finance
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2020 ReSAKSS Annual Conference - Plenary Session IV–Policies for Inclusive Development of Modern Food Value Chains

  1. 1. Policy Responses to Rapidly Transforming Midstream Value Chain Segments in Africa: The Case of Millet Sector in Senegal Getaw Tadesse and Ousmane Badiane
  2. 2. Introduction • Objective • Assess the policy responses to Africa’s rapidly emerging traditional staples value chains • Specifically address • How the middle actors of traditional staple value chains perform? • How aligned are the policy responses with performances? • Using the millet sector from Senegal • Data collected from 87 wholesalers, 75 primary processors, 922 secondary processors, 582 retailers
  3. 3. The importance of millet in Senegal’s cereal sector Figure 7.1—The Importance of Millet in Senegalese Cereal Value chains
  4. 4. Competitiveness of millet and non-millet industries Figure 7.2.– Four-Firm Concentration Ratios in All Cereal and Millet Industries
  5. 5. • Implications • Declining profit that may lead to collapse • The need for strong and targeted public supports • Innovation and economies of scale as key areas of policy response to this sector Rapid firm-entry in millet sector Figure 7.3—Growth in number of millet enterprises in Senegal, cumulative percentages
  6. 6. Indicators Wholesalers (WS) Primary processors (PP) Secondary processors (SP) Retailers (RT) Percentage female owners 0.0 4.0 97.9 9.3 Percentage young owners (<35 years old) 41.4 36.0 14.9 54.6 Percentage self-employed at start-up 43.7 60.0 80.5 85.2 Median investment at start-up (1,000 CFA) 1,500.0 1,075.0 24.0 435.0 Median capacity at start-up (kg per day) 800.0 200.0 7.0 40.0 Median firm capacity growth rate (%) 5.4 2.5 4.5 2.9 Median sales per capacity 1.16 0.27 9.73 4.74 Performance of the millet middle actors • Secondary processers are • more inclusive, • smaller • faster growing than others
  7. 7. • The three I’s of public interventions for industrial development • Infrastructural • Institutions • Incentives • We specifically assessed the access and effectiveness of • Financial services • Trainings; vocational, commercial, at startup and current stage • Membership in a collective action Policy interventions
  8. 8. Insufficient access to institutional supports Wholesalers Primary processors Secondary processors Retailers All Sample size 87 75 922 582 1,666 Sources of start-up financing (%) Own income 90.8 80.0 49.1 80.9 63.8 Gifts from family and others 10.3 17.3 47.4 18.6 34.0 Commercial loan 11.5 9.3 8.2 4.8 7.3 Noncommercial loan 10.3 10.7 8.9 13.4 10.6 Public loan 0.0 4.0 1.7 0.0 1.9 Start-up training (%) 1.1 10.7 15.9 1.4 9.8 On-the-job training 0.0 1.3 6.3 0.3 3.7 Membership in 2015 27.3 7.4 13.2 9.0 12.3 Membership current 23.0 6.7 12.6 8.6 11.5
  9. 9. • Results of econometrics analysis indicate that • Female owners have lower probability of receiving trainings than males • Entrepreneurs younger than 30 years have lower probability of receiving • Financial, training, and membership supports • Large and medium enterprises receive support more than small enterprises • Training and membership supports Less inclusive and efficient targeting Who has access to public supports?
  10. 10. • The impacts of the supports were measured on • Secondary processers’ capacity level and growth rate • Trainings appears to be more important than others Suggesting a strong need for firm-level capacity building • Vocational trainings are more effective than the other trainings • Vocational trainings are more effective at startup than at current A strong need for aligning policies with industrial growth stages How effective are the policy interventions?
  11. 11. • Policy interventions need to reflect the transformation trajectory • For emerging traditional staples, focus on competitiveness and innovation • Enterprise-level capacities and vocational trainings are more effective • Policy interventions need to target the inclusive and fast growing SMEs • Significant effort is needed to minimize the gender bias in public support Concluding remarks

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