Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Nous utilisons votre profil LinkedIn et vos données d’activité pour vous proposer des publicités personnalisées et pertinentes. Vous pouvez changer vos préférences de publicités à tout moment.
Skills Development for Value
Chain Actors in African
Agriculture
Dr. Oliver K. Kirui,
Centre for Development Research (ZEF...
 Value chain actors (farmers, aggregators, processors, wholesalers,
retailers,, transporters, producer organizations etc....
 Skills and knowledge are key inputs for agricultural productivity and a
precondition for effective and efficient managem...
The (agricultural) TVET sector is grossly inadequate across Africa:
 There are far too few training opportunities for you...
Actors in TVET in Africa
1. Technical skills: e.g. land preparation methods, proper use of inputs (seeds,
fertilizers) and machinery, crop and soil...
Input supply
Production
Processing &
storage
Retailing &
logistics
Industrial service specialist
Electronics technician
Fo...
 The Africa-wide ATVET, as envisioned in the CAADP, seeks to offer a solution
to Africa’s lack of trained and qualified s...
Country-level ATVET initiatives
Alage ATVET College (Ethiopia)
 Considerable resources
 >4,200 ha of land, infrastructur...
Costs
 Total annual costs in Kenya: from $ 204
for apprenticeships to US$ 1,704 for the
most expensive private TVET lasti...
 Investment to advance skills is critical for African agrifood sector:
 Curriculum should target beyond the core profess...
Prochain SlideShare
Chargement dans…5
×

2020 ReSAKSS Annual Conference - Plenary Session V Enabling Environment for Transforming Agrifood Systems

16 vues

Publié le

Presentation on "Skills Development for Value Chain Actors in African Agriculture" by Olivier Krui, ZEF

Publié dans : Économie & finance
  • Soyez le premier à commenter

  • Soyez le premier à aimer ceci

2020 ReSAKSS Annual Conference - Plenary Session V Enabling Environment for Transforming Agrifood Systems

  1. 1. Skills Development for Value Chain Actors in African Agriculture Dr. Oliver K. Kirui, Centre for Development Research (ZEF), University of Bonn, Germany. November 5, 2020
  2. 2.  Value chain actors (farmers, aggregators, processors, wholesalers, retailers,, transporters, producer organizations etc.) are critical for agricultural transformation.  What types of skills development do they need to realize this agr. transformation?  Describe skills gaps and training needs of various agrifood VC actors in Africa  Highlight the skills development and training provision for agrifood VC actors – focus on continental interventions and some significant national initiatives  Highlight some policy recommendations that would enhance to skills development and for agrifood VC development in Africa. Aims of this chapter
  3. 3.  Skills and knowledge are key inputs for agricultural productivity and a precondition for effective and efficient management of resources.  Vocational training and skills development could transform small-scale producers and other VC actors into skilled entrepreneurs – increase productivity, productive and sustainable economic enterprises.  Impact of training and skills: higher productivity can increase food supply, lower food prices, better nutrition  Training and skills on specific topics such as post-harvest handling are more important  Ultimately; improved food security, increased incomes in the agrifood & allied sectors Importance of skills development
  4. 4. The (agricultural) TVET sector is grossly inadequate across Africa:  There are far too few training opportunities for young people.  TVET institutes in many countries have suffered from many years of neglect (poorly equipped with physical, human, financial resources).  Where some training is available;  Often lacks practical relevance to labour market needs,  Does not match the needs of the private sector,  Focusses mainly (if not solely) on technical (hard) skills,  The curriculum in many such institutions is outdated.  Low quality of teaching in many institutions:  Most of the teaching staff lack the requisite combination of academic competencies alongside technical qualifications and industry experience. Skill gaps and institutional challenges
  5. 5. Actors in TVET in Africa
  6. 6. 1. Technical skills: e.g. land preparation methods, proper use of inputs (seeds, fertilizers) and machinery, crop and soil management, and postharvest handling and storage. 2. Processing skills: for transforming raw products into shelf-stable products that preserve the nutritional content of foods, smooth seasonal availabilities, enable wider distribution, reducing food waste. 3. Management skills: help value chain actors efficiently manage their physical, financial, and human capital resources, thereby boosting production quantities. 4. Entrepreneurial and business skills: increase the profitability of enterprises (input and output market participation and engaging with other VC actors). Training needs of agrifood VC actors
  7. 7. Input supply Production Processing & storage Retailing & logistics Industrial service specialist Electronics technician Food technology specialist Dairy technology specialist Distillery specialist Logistics specialist Retailing specialist Packaging technologist Marketing specialist Examples of core professions Insurance and finance specialist Accountant Office communication specialist Office management specialist Cleaning service Examples of support professions Animal breeding specialist Crop technology specialist Home economics specialist Specialist for agri. services Mechantronics technichian for farm machines Farmer Fish farm specialist Production technology specialist Air conditioning technologist Waste management specialist Laboratory assistant Electronics technician Laboratory assistant Chemical technician Examples of overarching professions Relevant professions for agrifood sector
  8. 8.  The Africa-wide ATVET, as envisioned in the CAADP, seeks to offer a solution to Africa’s lack of trained and qualified smallholder farmers.  Develop and implement market-oriented qualification measures and coherent plans.  Incorporate ATVET components into national education systems.  Piloted (2012-2015) in six countries: Benin, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, and Togo and focus on specific (2-3) value chains in each country.  Key elements of success:  Institutional analysis of ATVET institutions  Identification of priority value chains for ATVET development  Selection of training centres for the implementation of pilot measures  Mapping of skills needs in agri. VCs and organizational capacity of the institutions  Training “pilot” individuals and institutions Africa-wide ATVET
  9. 9. Country-level ATVET initiatives Alage ATVET College (Ethiopia)  Considerable resources  >4,200 ha of land, infrastructure & facilities for practical agri. training  Multidisciplinary training of development (extension) agents (DAs)  >60,000 local teachers, DAs, and students  Mix courses: short-term trainings (to DAs >>> farmers), outreach programs Songhaï Training Center (Benin)  Dense collaboration (> 40) of public & private organizations & universities,  Targets young entrepreneurs; SD, creating jobs, prevent rural exodus  Training is open to anyone wishing to receive agri. entrepreneurship skills  Framework to monitor & support trainees post training (microcredit, farm set up)  Practical and entrepreneurial curricula  Cascading info transfer & teaching system
  10. 10. Costs  Total annual costs in Kenya: from $ 204 for apprenticeships to US$ 1,704 for the most expensive private TVET lasting 2- 3 years.  Uganda: median cost is US$ 444 for a 3-year training  Ghana and Mozambique: Total costs is $ 1,500 (3-4 cost of secondary education) Benefits  Trainees perform skilled tasks (time x wage that a firm would need to pay skilled workers)  Trainees performing unskilled tasks (equiv. to wage that the firm would have had to pay unskilled workers)  Direct influence on teaching and learning programs to suit skills’ needs  Reduction in future costs of recruitment, induction and in-house training Costs-benefit projections of TVET Note: Investment per person for ATVET is about US$ 500, but it significantly fosters productivity
  11. 11.  Investment to advance skills is critical for African agrifood sector:  Curriculum should target beyond the core professions at different stages of the VCs.  Expand focus of skill development in both agri. and non-agri. sectors in rural areas  Priority: identify significant VCs (employ many people and generate incomes) and to develop curricula for the various actors in these VCs.  Adapt to emerging innovative training delivery (e.g. use of ICTs, entrepreneurial education, administer more practical learning).  Skills development should draw from successful examples & models from the continent and experiences from other countries (e.g. German dual system).  Provide incentives to encourage private sector participation in skills development Conclusions and policy priorities

×