Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
1Entefy | The brain on social media
The brain’s
complex relationship
with social media
2Entefy | The brain on social media
introduction
3Entefy | The brain on social media
These slides provide data and
insights for anyone interested
in the complex relationsh...
4Entefy | The brain on social media
This presentation was curated by
Entefy, the company building the first
universal comm...
5Entefy | The brain on social media
background
6Entefy | The brain on social media
We’ve all experienced
that “itch” to scroll
through social media
feeds
7Entefy | The brain on social media
It’s the same trigger
that leads us
to overindulge
in anything
8Entefy | The brain on social media
Compulsive behaviors
are linked to the brain’s
dopamine pathways
9Entefy | The brain on social media
Dopamine is the
neurotransmitter
behind the
motivation
to earn a reward
10Entefy | The brain on social media
The enjoyment of the
reward is the result of
the opioid system
11Entefy | The brain on social media
Together they create
a behavioral loop of
wanting and liking
12Entefy | The brain on social media
Here’s how it works
with social media
13Entefy | The brain on social media
Notifications ignite
dopamine, making
us want to check for
new information
14Entefy | The brain on social media
You check your feeds
and enjoy feeling
informed thanks to
the opioid system
15Entefy | The brain on social media
Which increases the
likelihood that you’ll
check it next time
16Entefy | The brain on social media
And voila, a new
behavioral loop
is born
17Entefy | The brain on social media
One interesting finding:
unpredictable
rewards work best
18Entefy | The brain on social media
Being unsure
when you’ll get the
reward makes you
want it more
19Entefy | The brain on social media
Social media is
perfectly suited for
unpredictability
20Entefy | The brain on social media
FORMING
LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
21Entefy | The brain on social media
Low levels of focus
can inhibit memory
formation
22Entefy | The brain on social media
Sensory memory
lasts for a fraction of a
second and relates to
perception
1
Stages of...
23Entefy | The brain on social media
Short-term
memory holds
information for
10-20 seconds
2
Stages of memory formation:
24Entefy | The brain on social media
Working memory
is where we understand
relationships, order,
and meaning
3
Stages of m...
25Entefy | The brain on social media
Humans can hold
5 to 9 bits of
information at once
26Entefy | The brain on social media
Long-term memory
can hold unlimited
items for an indefinite
period of time
27Entefy | The brain on social media
To become a long-term
memory, information
must survive filtering
28Entefy | The brain on social media
The challenge is that
remembering requires
sustained attention
29Entefy | The brain on social media
THE END OF
SUSTAINED
ATTENTION
30Entefy | The brain on social media
We spend 10-20
seconds
on the average
web page
31Entefy | The brain on social media
59% of retweeted
links were never
read by the person
sharing them
32Entefy | The brain on social media
The more information
we try to hold at once,
the worse we are at
processing it
33Entefy | The brain on social media
Bouncing between
information sources
inhibits the brain’s ability
to find coherence
34Entefy | The brain on social media
If we bounce between
information sources
too much, we fail to
record anything of
subs...
35Entefy | The brain on social media
SCALING IT BACK
36Entefy | The brain on social media
Moderation and
sustained focus
can overcome these
shortcomings
37Entefy | The brain on social media
When information is easy
to find, we usually only
retain where it was found,
not what...
38Entefy | The brain on social media
This allows us to focus
on the big picture
instead of details
39Entefy | The brain on social media
The brain’s
plasticity increases
in response to
novelty, making it
stronger
40Entefy | The brain on social media
The hippocampus is
vital to forming long-
term memories
41Entefy | The brain on social media
And it’s one of the
first systems to
break down in
Alzheimer’s disease
42Entefy | The brain on social media
A hippocampus
capable of adapting
provides a boost
to learning
43Entefy | The brain on social media
This happens when
we’re immersed in
new experiences
44Entefy | The brain on social media
Good or bad, social
media sites offer
as much novelty
as we desire
45Entefy | The brain on social media
CONCLUSION
46Entefy | The brain on social media
Social media is filled
with information
that grabs our attention
47Entefy | The brain on social media
If we focaus
more instead
of repeatedly
scrolling...
48Entefy | The brain on social media
We absorb more,
strengthen our brain,
and crave less
49Entefy | The brain on social media
Entefy’s universal communicator is an intelligent
communication platform that seamles...
You’ve finished this document.
Download and read it offline.
Upcoming SlideShare
What to Upload to SlideShare
Next
Upcoming SlideShare
What to Upload to SlideShare
Next
Download to read offline and view in fullscreen.

7

Share

Inattention: the brain’s complex relationship with social media by Entefy

Download to read offline

Social media feeds can be a great way to pass the time discovering new information from sources we trust and admire. But repeatedly revisiting those feeds is also perfectly suited to overindulgence because the impulse to “check in” runs on the same mental machinery that drives overindulge in exercise or sweets or coffee.

Then there’s the attention factor. Research suggests that low levels of focus can negatively impact memory formation. There are ways to improve memory retention, which starts with understanding how memories are formed. So what does it take to remember?

Entefy curated a presentation based on our article about the brain’s complex relationship with social media. These slides provide a research-driven perspective on how the human brain adapts (and doesn’t) to the unique characteristics of social media technology.

For additional analysis and links to our background sources, read “Inattention: The brain’s complex relationship with social media" on our blog at https://blog.entefy.com/view/292/Inattention-The-brains-complex-relationship-with-social-media.

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Inattention: the brain’s complex relationship with social media by Entefy

  1. 1. 1Entefy | The brain on social media The brain’s complex relationship with social media
  2. 2. 2Entefy | The brain on social media introduction
  3. 3. 3Entefy | The brain on social media These slides provide data and insights for anyone interested in the complex relationship our brains have with social media.
  4. 4. 4Entefy | The brain on social media This presentation was curated by Entefy, the company building the first universal communicator—an AI- powered communication platform that seamlessly connects the people, services, conversations, contacts, files, apps, and smart things in your digital universe.
  5. 5. 5Entefy | The brain on social media background
  6. 6. 6Entefy | The brain on social media We’ve all experienced that “itch” to scroll through social media feeds
  7. 7. 7Entefy | The brain on social media It’s the same trigger that leads us to overindulge in anything
  8. 8. 8Entefy | The brain on social media Compulsive behaviors are linked to the brain’s dopamine pathways
  9. 9. 9Entefy | The brain on social media Dopamine is the neurotransmitter behind the motivation to earn a reward
  10. 10. 10Entefy | The brain on social media The enjoyment of the reward is the result of the opioid system
  11. 11. 11Entefy | The brain on social media Together they create a behavioral loop of wanting and liking
  12. 12. 12Entefy | The brain on social media Here’s how it works with social media
  13. 13. 13Entefy | The brain on social media Notifications ignite dopamine, making us want to check for new information
  14. 14. 14Entefy | The brain on social media You check your feeds and enjoy feeling informed thanks to the opioid system
  15. 15. 15Entefy | The brain on social media Which increases the likelihood that you’ll check it next time
  16. 16. 16Entefy | The brain on social media And voila, a new behavioral loop is born
  17. 17. 17Entefy | The brain on social media One interesting finding: unpredictable rewards work best
  18. 18. 18Entefy | The brain on social media Being unsure when you’ll get the reward makes you want it more
  19. 19. 19Entefy | The brain on social media Social media is perfectly suited for unpredictability
  20. 20. 20Entefy | The brain on social media FORMING LASTING IMPRESSIONS
  21. 21. 21Entefy | The brain on social media Low levels of focus can inhibit memory formation
  22. 22. 22Entefy | The brain on social media Sensory memory lasts for a fraction of a second and relates to perception 1 Stages of memory formation:
  23. 23. 23Entefy | The brain on social media Short-term memory holds information for 10-20 seconds 2 Stages of memory formation:
  24. 24. 24Entefy | The brain on social media Working memory is where we understand relationships, order, and meaning 3 Stages of memory formation:
  25. 25. 25Entefy | The brain on social media Humans can hold 5 to 9 bits of information at once
  26. 26. 26Entefy | The brain on social media Long-term memory can hold unlimited items for an indefinite period of time
  27. 27. 27Entefy | The brain on social media To become a long-term memory, information must survive filtering
  28. 28. 28Entefy | The brain on social media The challenge is that remembering requires sustained attention
  29. 29. 29Entefy | The brain on social media THE END OF SUSTAINED ATTENTION
  30. 30. 30Entefy | The brain on social media We spend 10-20 seconds on the average web page
  31. 31. 31Entefy | The brain on social media 59% of retweeted links were never read by the person sharing them
  32. 32. 32Entefy | The brain on social media The more information we try to hold at once, the worse we are at processing it
  33. 33. 33Entefy | The brain on social media Bouncing between information sources inhibits the brain’s ability to find coherence
  34. 34. 34Entefy | The brain on social media If we bounce between information sources too much, we fail to record anything of substance
  35. 35. 35Entefy | The brain on social media SCALING IT BACK
  36. 36. 36Entefy | The brain on social media Moderation and sustained focus can overcome these shortcomings
  37. 37. 37Entefy | The brain on social media When information is easy to find, we usually only retain where it was found, not what it’s about
  38. 38. 38Entefy | The brain on social media This allows us to focus on the big picture instead of details
  39. 39. 39Entefy | The brain on social media The brain’s plasticity increases in response to novelty, making it stronger
  40. 40. 40Entefy | The brain on social media The hippocampus is vital to forming long- term memories
  41. 41. 41Entefy | The brain on social media And it’s one of the first systems to break down in Alzheimer’s disease
  42. 42. 42Entefy | The brain on social media A hippocampus capable of adapting provides a boost to learning
  43. 43. 43Entefy | The brain on social media This happens when we’re immersed in new experiences
  44. 44. 44Entefy | The brain on social media Good or bad, social media sites offer as much novelty as we desire
  45. 45. 45Entefy | The brain on social media CONCLUSION
  46. 46. 46Entefy | The brain on social media Social media is filled with information that grabs our attention
  47. 47. 47Entefy | The brain on social media If we focaus more instead of repeatedly scrolling...
  48. 48. 48Entefy | The brain on social media We absorb more, strengthen our brain, and crave less
  49. 49. 49Entefy | The brain on social media Entefy’s universal communicator is an intelligent communication platform that seamlessly connects the people, services, conversations, contacts, files, apps, and smart things in your digital life. About Entefy ©2017 Entefy Inc. All rights reserved. contact@entefy.com | entefy.com
  • todddoubleu

    Sep. 16, 2017
  • hahvahd

    May. 6, 2017
  • AliRezaEbadat

    May. 4, 2017
  • KirillKrasov1

    May. 4, 2017
  • JaylenWillingham

    May. 4, 2017
  • sfccentertainment

    May. 3, 2017
  • rstrad1

    May. 3, 2017

Social media feeds can be a great way to pass the time discovering new information from sources we trust and admire. But repeatedly revisiting those feeds is also perfectly suited to overindulgence because the impulse to “check in” runs on the same mental machinery that drives overindulge in exercise or sweets or coffee. Then there’s the attention factor. Research suggests that low levels of focus can negatively impact memory formation. There are ways to improve memory retention, which starts with understanding how memories are formed. So what does it take to remember? Entefy curated a presentation based on our article about the brain’s complex relationship with social media. These slides provide a research-driven perspective on how the human brain adapts (and doesn’t) to the unique characteristics of social media technology. For additional analysis and links to our background sources, read “Inattention: The brain’s complex relationship with social media" on our blog at https://blog.entefy.com/view/292/Inattention-The-brains-complex-relationship-with-social-media.

Views

Total views

988

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

104

Actions

Downloads

16

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

7

×