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Lesson 3

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Understanding Search Engines

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Lesson 3

  1. 1. Understanding Search Engines What Is The Web? Web Search Lesson Plan Module A1
  2. 2. First Things First Introducing the Internet
  3. 3. Google Confidential and Word Soup There are a lot of names and terms associated with the internet, the web, browsers, and search engines. Sorting them out can get confusing!
  4. 4. Google Confidential and What is the Internet? The internet is a global network of computers. It is millions of computers around the world, all connected. People often think of the internet as a cloud in space. In reality, every computer in the "inter-network", or internet, is connected by actual wires -- ethernet cables, phone lines, and fiber optic wiring on the ocean floor!
  5. 5. Google Confidential and What is the Web? People often use the words "the internet" and "the web" interchangeably. Is there a difference? The World Wide Web is just one part of the internet. The internet also includes e-mail, instant messaging, multiplayer gaming, and FTP (peer-to-peer file sharing).
  6. 6. Google Confidential and What is a Browser? A browser is a tool to help you access the World Wide Web. Check it out!
  7. 7. Bits & Pieces Websites, Webpages, and Web Addresses
  8. 8. Google Confidential and Websites vs. Webpages A website is a collection of webpages that belong to one domain or owner. A webpage is a single document (which can include images, videos, charts, etc) viewable through a web browser. For example, www.sandiegozoo.org is a website for the San Diego Zoo. "Hours & Directions" is one webpage on the website.
  9. 9. Google Confidential and What is a Web Address? A web address is the identifying address for a file, or webpage, on the internet. Typing a web address into the browser bar, or address bar, allows you to access this file on the internet. Another word for "web address" is URL. An example of a web address is http://www.google.com.
  10. 10. Google Confidential and What is a Search Engine? A search engine is a program to help you find webpages on the internet. Some examples of search engines include Google, Bing, Yahoo, and Ask.
  11. 11. Google Confidential and Deep Web vs. Visible Web When you use a search engine, you only have access to the visible web -- the part of the web your search engine has indexed. The entire web is much larger than any one search engine's index. It is estimated that the deep web is over 500 times the size of the visible web! The deep web includes webpages that are not linked to by other pages, password- protected sites, and private databases (such as library catalogs).
  12. 12. Google Confidential and Proprietary Putting It All Together Source: • The Internet • The Web • Browser • Search Engine • Website vs. Webpage • Web Address (URL) Can you remember what each of these words mean? How are these terms different? How are they related?
  13. 13. GOOGLE LANDING
  14. 14. Homepage
  15. 15. Enter your query here Click this button or hit "enter" Say What You Want A "query" is the word or phrase you search for in Google.
  16. 16. Another Search Option What happened? Try clicking "I'm Feeling Lucky."
  17. 17. Different Search Tools Have you used these?
  18. 18. Advanced Search Visit the Advanced Search page. Enter a search using several of the search options offered there.
  19. 19. The Search Engine Results Page Search bar Left panel Organic (natural) search results Sponsored links (ads)
  20. 20. Organic (natural) search results
  21. 21. Reading Individual Search Results
  22. 22. Reading Individual Search Results
  23. 23. Give It a Try! If you had a website, what would a search engine show about your site? Write a fictional search result, complete with title, snippet, web address, and similar links.
  24. 24. Search Techniques & Strategies Which Link Should I Follow? Web Search Lesson Plan Module B1
  25. 25. Make Google Work for You Some Basic FactsMake Google Work for You Some Basic Facts
  26. 26. Choosing a Link Does it matter which link you chose here?
  27. 27. Link Choice Can Matter Would link choice make a difference here?
  28. 28. The Anatomy of a Search Results Page What are these parts called?
  29. 29. The Anatomy of a Search Results Page 1 2 34 56 1. Search Result 2. Title 3. Snippet 4. Web Address 5. Sponsored Link (Ad) 6. Left Panel
  30. 30. Ranking Results How does Google's understanding of what I want affect the order of my search results?
  31. 31. Predicting the Best Source Tips for Finding What You Want
  32. 32. Think About What You See What clues tell you if these results are about life in the American Colonies?
  33. 33. Tips for Understanding Web Addresses Is the domain name from a personal page hosting website? For example: Homestead.com, Geocities.com, Tripod.com4 Is there a symbol (% or ~) or name, showing it is a personal page? For example: %, ~, dchen, member, user3 What type of domain is it? For example: .com, .edu, .gov, .ru, .info, etc.2 Have I heard of the domain? For example: nytimes.com, lostagoodnews.com1 5 Does the address tell what kind of file it is? For example: pdf, xls, jpg
  34. 34. Features & Operators Hello Operators Web Search Lesson Plan Module C1
  35. 35. Google Search Operators Powering Up Your Search
  36. 36. What is an Operator? An operator is a symbol that modifies the words or numbers around it. You already know some operators! + % " " * _ ( ) > ! $ # &
  37. 37. Google Search Operators In search, an operator changes your search query -- often with drastic results! These operators can help you tweak, refine, and narrow your search. There are seven basic operators in Google Search.
  38. 38. Search Tools Using Operators to Narrow Your Search
  39. 39. Exclusion (-) The minus symbol (-) excludes words from your search results. Try these searches: [panthers] [panthers -sports] What do you notice?
  40. 40. Inclusion (+) The plus symbol (+) makes sure the word it precedes is used exactly as you entered it. Try these searches: [ball] [+ball] What do you notice?
  41. 41. Similar Words (~) The tilde symbol (~) includes similar words in your search results. Try these searches: [food store] [~food ~store] What do you notice?
  42. 42. Multiple Words (OR) The boolean "or" (OR) includes one, the other, or both words in your search results. Try these searches: [curl straighten hair] [curl OR straighten hair] What do you notice?
  43. 43. Number Range (..) The dot-dot symbol (..) includes a range of numbers in your search results. Try these searches: [academy awards 1965] [academy awards 1965..1973] What do you notice?
  44. 44. Fill-in-the-Blank (*) The star or asterisk symbol (*) leaves space for a missing word in your search results. Try these searches: [dark and night] [dark and * night] What do you notice?
  45. 45. Exact Phrase (" ") Double quotes (" ") include only the exact phrase -- the exact words in the exact order you entered them -- in your search results. Try these searches: [alexander bell] ["alexander bell"] What do you notice?
  46. 46. Putting It All Together Source: http://www.cashedge.com/pressRoom/news_070104_bst.html • Exclusion (-) • Inclusion (+) • Similar Words (~) • Multiple Words (OR) • Number Range (..) • Fill-in-the-Blank (*) • Exact Phrase (" ") Can you think of particular examples when these search operators could help you?
  47. 47. Online Research Techniques
  48. 48. 1. Check Your Sources 2. Ask Good Questions 3. Go Beyond the Surface 4. Be Patient 5. Respect Ownership 6. Use Your Networks
  49. 49. Top 15 Most Popular Search Engines as of November 2016
  50. 50. 1. 1,600,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors
  51. 51. 2. 400,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors
  52. 52. 3. 300,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors
  53. 53. 245,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors 4.
  54. 54. 125,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors 5.
  55. 55. 100,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors 6.
  56. 56. 65,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors 7.
  57. 57. 60,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors 8.
  58. 58. 24,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors 9.
  59. 59. 13,500,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors 10.
  60. 60. 13,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors 11.
  61. 61. 11,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors 12.
  62. 62. 10,500,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors 13.
  63. 63. 7,500,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors 14.
  64. 64. 4,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors 15.

Editor's Notes

  • Sorting-categorizing
  • In·ter·net - global computer network: a network that links computer networks all over the world by satellite and telephone, connecting users with service networks such as e-mail and the World Wide Web
    -Ethernet is a family of computer networking technologies commonly used in local area networks, metropolitan area networks and wide area networks.
  •  
    P2P file sharing allows users to access media files such as books, music, movies, and games using a P2P software program that searches for other connected computers on a P2P network to locate the desired content. The nodes (peers) of such networks are end-user computer systems that are interconnected via the Internet
    Peer-to-peer (P2P) is an approach to content distribution in which digital files are transferred between “peer” computers over the Internet. In a client/server structure, servers store content and, when requested, send that content to client machines—a one-to- many distribution model.
    The File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is a standard network protocol used to transfer computer files between a client and server on a computer network. FTP is built on a client-server model architecture and uses separate control and data connections between the client and the server
     
    -The client–server model is a distributed application structure that partitions tasks or workloads between the providers of a resource or service, called servers, and service requesters, called clients.
  • A browser is software that accesses and displays pages and files on the web. Browsers require a connection to the Internet (e.g., through a cable modem, a direct Ethernet connection, or Wi-Fi). Popular web browsers include Firefox, Internet Explorer, and Safari. Firefox is available for both Windows and Mac computers.
    A Web browser is a program used to visit websites, while a search engine is a website that allows you to look for specific websites or information based on keywords, dates and other criteria. Common examples of Web browsers include Internet Explorer, Safari, Firefox and Chrome.
     
    Mozilla is a web browser, not a search engine. Its default search engine is yahoo, although that can be configured in preferences
    ----A browser is used to access the Internet whereas in order to open a search engine
    you need a browser
    -----There are many browsers such as Internet Explorer, Firefox, Safari, and Opera, etc. A browser is used to access various websites and web pages. A search engineis also a software program that searches for some particular document when specific keywords are entered
  • If a website were a book, then awebpage would be a chapter in that book.
  • Domain names are used to identify one or more IP addresses. For example, the domain name microsoft.com represents about a dozen IP addresses. Domain names are used in URLs to identify particular Web pages. For example, in the URL http://www.pcwebopedia.com/index.html, the domain name is pcwebopedia.com
    URL is the abbreviation of Uniform Resource Locator. It is the global address of documents and other resources on the World Wide Web. For example, www.webopedia.com is a URL
  • An index is an indicator or measure of something, and in finance, it typically refers to a statistical measure of change in a securities market. In the case of financial markets, stock and bond market indices consist of an imaginary portfolio of securities representing a particular market or a portion of it
    Domain names are used to identify one or more IP addresses. For example, thedomain name microsoft.com represents about a dozen IP addresses. Domain names are used in URLs to identify particular Web pages. For example, in the URL http://www.pcwebopedia.com/index.html, the domain name is pcwebopedia.com
    URL is the abbreviation of Uniform Resource Locator. It is the global address of documents and other resources on the World Wide Web. For example, www.webopedia.com is a URL

    --------1. A browser is used to access websites and web pages whereas a search engine is
    used to search for particular information.
    2. I.E., Firefox, Safari, and Chrome are the most popular web browsers while Google and
    Yahoo are the most popular search engines.
    3. A browser is used to access the Internet whereas in order to open a search engine
    you need a browser.
    Read more: Difference Between Search Engine and Browser | Difference Between | Search Engine vs Browser http://www.differencebetween.net/technology/internet/difference-between-search-engine-and-browser/#ixzz5YVvLKBiK

  • The deep web,[1] invisible web,[2] or hidden web[3] are parts of the World Wide Web whose contents are not indexed by standard search engines for any reason. The opposite term to the deep web is the surface web. The deep web includes many very common uses such as web mail, online banking but also paid for services with a paywall such as video on demand, and many more. Computer scientist Mike Bergman is credited with coining the term deep web in 2000 as a search indexing term.[4]
     
    The Surface Web (also called the Visible Web, Clearnet, Indexed Web, Indexable Webor Lightnet,) is that portion of the World Wide Web that is readily available to the general public and searchable with standard web search engines. It is the opposite of the deep web.

    --an alternate name for the process in the context of search engines designed to find web pages on the Internet is web indexing.
    ----In layman's terms, indexing is the process of adding webpages into Google search. Depending upon which meta tag you used (index or NO-index), Google will crawl and index your pages. A no-index tag means that that page will not be added into the web search's index. By default, every WordPress post and page is indexed
    ---The deep web, invisible web, or hidden web are parts of the World Wide Web whose contents are not indexed by standard web search engines for any reason
  • This is what the homepage looks like, you find it by entering google.com in the address bar of your browser.
  • When you want to find information with Google, you click in the search box on the homepage. 

    You can tell you are there when you see your cursor blinking in the box.

    Then, type the words you want to find into the search box like this.  (Demonstrate in an open browser, if available) 

    When you are done, you can either click the button here that says "Google Search," or you can simply hit the "enter" button on your keyboard.

    (You can open a browser such as Chrome, Firefox, or Safari and demonstrate where students might type a search into the browser's toolbar. In Chrome, you type both queries and addresses into the address bar. In other browsers, the long bar across the top of the browser is for entering addresses, and the smaller box--often in the upper right-hand corner--is for entering queries.)
  • Have students enter a simple query try the "I'm Feeling Lucky" button. Ask them to observe what happens.

    Possible answer: I'm Feeling Lucky does not take me to search results, but takes me directly to the page that Google would give as my first result to the query I entered.

    We all know how regular Google works, right? You type in a phrase, you press the search button, (you can also just press return or enter on your keyboard) and Google returns a results page that shows multiple Web sites matching your search phrase. The I'm Feeling Lucky button skips the search results page and goes directly to the first ranked page for that search phrase. 
  • If you are looking for something that is not necessarily on a typical web page, you might want to click on one of these links and use one of Google's special search tools. 

    From here, you can go directly into Google Images, Google Books, etc. We'll talk about these tools in a later lesson.
  • Show students the link to the Advanced search page, and take a quick look at the advanced search box. Together or individually, try using several of the boxes to run a more complex search.
    ----Advanced Search
    Narrow down search results for complex searches by using the Advanced Search page. For example, you can find sites updated in the last 24 hours or images that are in black and white
    ------Advanced search options are a set of very useful features offered by most searchengines and search tools on the Web. Advanced search gives the Web searcher the ability to narrow their searches by a series of different filters; i.e., language, proximity, domain,
  • Now that you have run a search, you need to understand how the search results page is laid out. 

    Introduce: 
    search bar
    left panel (the subject of later lessons)
    organic search results
    sponsored links (ads)

    As you click, each of these sections will be highlighted, and the next click will show the section's name. 
    ---Organic search results are listings on search engineresults pages that appear because of their relevance to the search terms, as opposed to their being advertisements. In contrast, non-organic search resultsmay include pay per click advertising
  • Google takes a snapshot of each page it examines and caches (stores) that version as a back-up. The cached version is what Google uses to judge if a page is a good match for your query. Practically every search result includes a Cached link. Dec 28, 2011
     
    Snippet is a programming term for a small region of re-usable source code, machine code, or text. Ordinarily, these are formally defined operative units to incorporate into larger programming modules. Snippet management is a feature of some text editors, program source code editors, IDEs, and related software. It allows the user to avoid repetitive typing in the course of routine edit operations.[1]
  • (1) 

    The first thing you see is the title.

    The title for the page is usually decided by the person who created it.

    Here, notice that the title tells us both the name of the page, "The Pesident's Job," and the name of the website from which it comes, "Scholastic.com."

    (click)

    (2) 
    The information in black underneath the title is called the snippet.

    The snippet gives you a sense of what you will find on the page, and what it has to do with the search you entered.

    This description was written by the website's author to help you understand what the page is about. Sometimes, Google shows you where your search term appears on the page, with a few words surrounding it to give you a sense of the context in which it appears.

    (click)

    (3)
    Below the snippet, in green, is the web address. It is the address for the webpage that you will visit if you click on this result. 

    (click)

    (4)
    The cached link shows you exactly what this web page looked like when Google last visited it. 

    If you click on the cached link, you will see a copy of the page as it existed at that time. 

    This cached link is particularly helpful if the webpage has changed very recently and the information you want is no longer there. 

    You can just click on the cached link and see what it was that Google found the last time we visited the page.

    You can also use the cached link if the page you want to visit is not functioning, or has been removed.

    (click)

    (5)
    Finally, if you find that this page does a good job meeting your needs, you can click on the similar items link to find more pages that have similar content.

  • "Snippet" a fictional web site - Students write up search results, like they saw in [Slide #11], of a website about themselves or interview a class member and write up search results about a fictional web page a class member might have.  Questions to ask: If they had a web site, what would a search engine show about their site?  Include: title, snippet, URL and similar pages. Share student created fictional search results with class to determine understanding of search results and what they mean.
  • Inquiry questions: Which link should I follow? Which search result has what I need?

    Students will learn to understand what the different parts of search results suggest about the content of the pages they offer.
    Students will learn to interpret these results in order to pick the best sources without reading every page.
  • The teacher explains: 

    "If you were cutting up a pineapple for the first time, how would you learn to do it?"

    Students guess how to search and anticipate how to read the search results. 

    For example, the query [cut pineapple] brings back a full screen of videos that show exactly how to do that successfully.
  • Then teacher explains: 

    “Now, let’s say you want to get a pet dog, but you think you want a pure-breed so you can compete in dog shows. If you search for what different breeds of dogs there are, how do you pick which page to visit?” 

    Brings back pages:
    snippets indicate various numbers of types of breeds (one indicates “over 195,” another “over 300”) 
    middle of the page is the American Kennel Club, which speaks of “recognized” breeds

    Ask what language indicates about why the website owner is talking about different breeds of dogs. 


    Alternatively, the teacher could have a search page open and take student guesses, but do not click on the links.
  • Discussion questions: 
    *How does Google search work? What do these search features mean?
    *How can they help you decide which link to follow?

    *Search results
    Possible Answers:
    These are the organic search results. The results are not influenced by sponsored links. Google does not sell results rank for search results. Organic search results and sponsored link results work from different and separate servers.

    *Title
    Possible Answers: 
    The name of the specific page you would visit if you clicked on that link.

    *Snippet
    Possible Answers: 
    A description of the content that you will find if you click on that search result. It may be written as a description, or it may be segments of the text of the page that show the words from your query.

    *Web address
    Possible Answers: 
    Also called a URL. The market for the unique location that webpage occupies on the Internet.

    *Sponsored links
    Possible Answers: 
    Google allows for ads with specific guidelines. Ads must be relevant to the search, not be distracting, and labeled clearly as "Sponsored Links". Google doesn't sell search results.

    *Left Panel
    Possible Answers: 
    The column of links down the left-hand side of the results screen. It suggests ways you might want to filter your results, and can be opened up to allow you to make a number of choices regarding how your results can be filtered and sorted. 
  • Discussion questions: 
    *How does Google search work? What do these search features mean?
    *How can they help you decide which link to follow?

    *Search results
    Possible Answers:
    These are the organic search results. The results are not influenced by sponsored links. Google does not sell results rank for search results. Organic search results and sponsored link results work from different and separate servers.

    *Title
    Possible Answers: 
    The name of the specific page you would visit if you clicked on that link.

    *Snippet
    Possible Answers: 
    A description of the content that you will find if you click on that search result. It may be written as a description, or it may be segments of the text of the page that show the words from your query.

    *Web address
    Possible Answers: 
    Also called a URL. The market for the unique location that webpage occupies on the Internet.

    *Sponsored links
    Possible Answers: 
    Google allows for ads with specific guidelines. Ads must be relevant to the search, not be distracting, and labeled clearly as "Sponsored Links". Google doesn't sell search results.

    *Left Panel
    Possible Answers: 
    The column of links down the left-hand side of the results screen. It suggests ways you might want to filter your results, and can be opened up to allow you to make a number of choices regarding how your results can be filtered and sorted. 
  • Google ranks results, showing you those that it thinks best fit your query first. 

    Google uses a specific calculation to determine both which results and where results appear on the search results page. 

    This calculation is based on similar (relevant) pages and web pages with hyperlinks to those pages. 

    So, the more popular and relevant a particular website, the more likely it will be ranked higher and indexed on the results page. 

    Google search is constantly being revised to make sure the most useful results appear on top. 

    Funny story: Lead singer of Franz Ferdinand, Alex Kapranos, gave interview. 

    He once said he would know if his band had "made it" when they occupied the first place in the search results! 

    Have they made it?
  • The first step in picking a link is thinking about what you see. 

    Look at the two search results.

    Discuss what clues students see that help them decide which would be good to click.
  • Inquiry questions: 

    How can I further refine my searches in order to find more relevant material? 

    How can I find results that might not be easily found with basic search? 

    What are the syntaxes associated with advanced search techniques?

    In this module, students will learn how to use Google's seven advanced search operators.
    Students will be able to conduct advanced searches and determine when each type of operator should be applied.
  • Give a brief introduction to operators. 

    Discuss with students what operators are and how they modify words or numbers around them. 

    Ask students to provide examples of how certain English and mathematical operators are used to change the meaning of a sentence or phrase.
  • Like English or math, Google Search has particular operators that modify a search query. 

    Tell students they will be introduced to seven advanced operators to use in their searches.
    Tweak- twist
  • Demonstrate advanced operator searches as indicated on the slides. 

    Conduct the searches on each slide with and without the advanced operator, and ask students to notice and discuss the differences in the search results between these searches.

    Encourage students to offer any other possible searches that might make use of each operator. 

    Ask students to follow along on computers if possible.
  • pre·cede
    prəˈsēd/
    verb
    past tense: preceded; past participle: preceded
    come before (something) in time.
    "a gun battle had preceded the explosions"
    synonyms:
    go/come before, lead (up) to, pave/prepare the way for, herald, introduce, usher in
    "commercials preceded the movie"
    come before in order or position.
    "take time to read the chapters that precede the recipes"
    synonyms:
    foregoing, previous, prior, former, precedent, earlier, above, aforementioned, antecedent;More
    go in front or ahead of.
    "he let her precede him through the gate"
    synonyms:
    go ahead of, go in front of, go before, go first, lead the way
    "Catherine preceded him into the studio"
     
  • Review and recap
  • CHECK YOUR SOURCES • Evaluating Web Resources - Currency -Accuracy - Authority -Objectively - Coverage 2. ASK GOOD QUESTIONS • "The answers you get in the literature depend on the questions you pose." —Margaret Atwood
    3. GO BEYOND THE SURFACE • Persistence by continuing to pursue information to gain a broad perspective. - SweetSearch Engine - iSeek it is a search engine for students, teachers, and administrators. it draws from the trusted resources from universities, government, and established non-commercial sites. 4. BE PATIENT Image by Tom Mooring
    5. RESPECT OWNERSHIP Respecting intellectual property rights of creators and produce 6. USE YOUR NETWORKS Using social networks and information tools to gather and share information. Strengths Internet researching is faster than other medium. For example when you searching with the book in the library it takes long time in searching about the topic. Internet researching will save user’s physical distance. For example you need to go to library and during find the information about topic it will make you spend your physical things. You can shear information with other people very quickly. Quality of information also better than other medium. Strength include speed, immediacy, and a complete disregard for physical distance.
  • Google: By far the most used search engine in the world, Google Search has been around since 1997 and is constantly improving with new smart results, advanced features, and integration with other Google products. As of February of this year, Google currently has 64.5% of the US’s search market share.
  • Bing: Bing is the latest name for Microsoft’s search engine, previously called Windows Live Search and MSN Search. Bing brands itself as a “decision engine”, aiming to present results with more real-world context than just finding text on a page. Bing also powers Yahoo’s search, which, coupled with Bing, serves 32.6% of US internet searchers.
  • ×