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Content Strategy for Mobile: The Workshop

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Content Strategy for Mobile: The Workshop

  1. CONTENT STRATEGY FOR MOBILE @karenmcgrane
  2. Could have done with less discussion on content strategy.
  3. WHAT YOU’RE IN FOR MOBILE CONTENT STRATEGY INTRO 9:00–10:30 Exercise: Convince Your CEO Break 10:30–11:00 ADAPTIVE CONTENT 11:00–12:00 Exercise: State of the Mobile Web Lunch 12:00–1:30 CONTENT INVENTORY 1:30–3:00 Exercise: Select Content to Include + Exclude Break 3:00–3:30 CONTENT MODELING 3:30–5:00 Exercise 4: Create Content Packages
  4. FOUR MOBILE TRUTHS
  5. 1. CONTENT MATTERS ON MOBILE.
  6. 2. STRIVE FOR CONTENT PARITY.
  7. 3. IT’S NOT A STRATEGY IF YOU CAN’T MAINTAIN IT.
  8. 4. YOU DON’T GET TO DECIDE WHICH DEVICE PEOPLE USE. THEY DO.
  9. No one will ever need to do that on mobile.
  10. ADVERTISER PLACES ITS URL IN A TV SPOT 86% say they use their smartphone while watching 79% of large television advertisers do not have a mobile site Source: Nielsen, Google
  11. Pepsi’s annual marketing budget is $1.7 BILLION USD
  12. RESTAURANT WEBSITE BUILT ENTIRELY USING FLASH 30% of searches for restaurants come from mobile Source: Google
  13. RETAILER REALIZES THAT PEOPLE USE THEIR MOBILES IN-STORE 66% say 33% say they they use their use their Only 37% of phones to smartphone retailers have a “pre-shop” while in-store mobile website stores Source: Google
  14. FINANCIAL SERVICES FIRMS BALANCE TRANSACTIONS AND INFORMATION 15% of searches for finance and insurance content are mobile Source: Google
  15. “ If your organization’s information is not available on a small screen, it’s not available at all to people who rely on their mobile phones for access. That’s likely to be young people, people with lower household incomes, and recent immigrants—arguably important target audiences for public health messages. —Pew Research
  16. UNIVERSITY WANTS TO REACH PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 62% of people 42% of them 18–24 have a say they rarely smartphone use the desktop web. Source: Nielsen, Pew
  17. GOVERNMENT MUST PROVIDE ACCESS TO ALL 60% with income Low below $25,000 income have no smartphone Internet access penetration at home jumped from 20% to 35% Source: Nielsen, Pew in 2011
  18. By 2015, more Americans will access the internet through mobile devices than through desktop computers. Source: IDC
  19. No one willalready wants Somebody ever need to do that on mobile. to do that on mobile.
  20. Mobile should be the “lite” version.
  21. Build a separate mobile site ✘ Cut features and content not core to the mobile use case ✘ Auto-redirect searches to your mobile site ✘ Send users who need more info to the desktop site ✘
  22. SCREEN SIZE IS NOT CONTEXT
  23. THE LONG TAIL OF CONTENT The last 20 or so pages still drive more than 1000 page views Source: Hubspot.com
  24. BEWARE PERSONALIZED INTERFACES http://blogs.msdn.com/b/jensenh/archive/2006/03/31/565877.aspx
  25. united club membership
  26. SEPARATE MOBILE SITES BREAK SEARCH http://xkcd.com/869/
  27. SEPARATE MOBILE SITES BREAK SOCIAL
  28. A LINK TO THE FULL DESKTOP WEBSITE IS A TERRIBLE USER EXPERIENCE.
  29. Mobile should offer an Mobileequivalent experience. should be the “lite” version.
  30. Our current publishing process will support mobile.
  31. Web Mobile
  32. MOBILE IS A FILTER, NOT A FORK
  33. 78% of businesses plan to deploy 47% want tablets by tools for their 2013 sales force Source: Model Metrics
  34. NO FORKING WAY
  35. Our current publishing process Our editorial process, workflow, and will support mobile. governance will need to change.
  36. DISCUSSION CONVINCE YOUR CEO Imagine you have a meeting with your chief executive or main client stakeholder to convince him or her that you need a more robust mobile content strategy. _What are the barriers that are preventing you from getting your content on mobile? _What are your 3–5 main talking points? How will you persuade your executives you need to do this?
  37. WHAT YOU’RE IN FOR MOBILE CONTENT STRATEGY INTRO 9:00–10:30 Exercise: Convince Your CEO Break 10:30–11:00 ADAPTIVE CONTENT 11:00–12:00 Exercise: State of the Mobile Web Lunch 12:00–1:30 CONTENT INVENTORY 1:30–3:00 Exercise: Select Content to Include + Exclude Break 3:00–3:30 CONTENT MODELING 3:30–5:00 Exercise 4: Create Content Packages
  38. ADAPTIVE CONTENT What is it, and why would I want it?
  39. “ Fragmenting our content across different “device-optimized” experiences is a losing proposition, or at least an unsustainable one. —Ethan Marcotte Responsive Web Design
  40. “ You can’t afford to create a piece of content for any one platform. Instead of crafting a website, you have to put more effort into crafting the description of the different bits of an asset, so they can be reused more effectively, so they can deliver more value. —Nic Newman, BBC
  41. MOBILE WEB MOBILE WEBSITE APPS SOCIAL TABLET MEDIA APPS CONTENT MICROSITES PRINT BLOGS EMAIL INTRANET
  42. REUSABLE CONTENT STRUCTURED CONTENT PRESENTATION-INDEPENDENT CONTENT MEANINGFUL METADATA USABLE CMS
  43. MULTIPLE VERSIONS ALTERNATIVE FALLBACKS
  44. REUSABLE CONTENT STRUCTURED CONTENT PRESENTATION-INDEPENDENT CONTENT MEANINGFUL METADATA USABLE CMS
  45. CHUNKS, NOT BLOBS
  46. REUSABLE CONTENT STRUCTURED CONTENT PRESENTATION-INDEPENDENT CONTENT MEANINGFUL METADATA USABLE CMS
  47. Their current website’s landing page is 1.5MB of tangled HTML, inline styles, Flash presentations, enormous slideshows, and deeply nested weird <div>s. @lyzadanger
  48. REUSABLE CONTENT STRUCTURED CONTENT PRESENTATION-INDEPENDENT CONTENT MEANINGFUL METADATA USABLE CMS
  49. Metadata is a love note to the future. Jason Scott, @textfiles
  50. REUSABLE CONTENT STRUCTURED CONTENT PRESENTATION-INDEPENDENT CONTENT MEANINGFUL METADATA USABLE CMS
  51. Content admins hate all the fields. But the reason they hate all the fields is the workflow is bad. Jason Pamental, @jpamental
  52. Most CMSs were designed to provide an interface to a data model rather than a user experience that helps content creators complete their tasks. Jeff Eaton, @eaton
  53. TASKS ARE MORE IMPORTANT THAN THE DATA MODEL.
  54. “ The happier people are, the better their content will be, the more content they’ll produce. —Patrick Cooper, NPR
  55. “ Beautiful software, even for back-end users, is becoming an expectation. We’re moving in this direction because we now understand that better content management systems foster better content. —Matt Thompson
  56. EXERCISE STATE OF THE MOBILE WEB Compare and contrast the a mobile website with the desktop website. (Don’t look at apps, just the mobile web.) _How much content is offered on the mobile website compared to the desktop site? _Is the architecture and navigation the same or different? _Is the branding and messaging the same or different? _How do you imagine this is managed in the CMS?
  57. MOBILE CONTENT STRATEGY PROCESS What do you need to do?
  58. WHAT YOU’RE IN FOR MOBILE CONTENT STRATEGY INTRO 9:00–10:30 Exercise: Convince Your CEO Break 10:30–11:00 ADAPTIVE CONTENT 11:00–12:00 Exercise: State of the Mobile Web Lunch 12:00–1:30 CONTENT INVENTORY 1:30–3:00 Exercise: Select Content to Include + Exclude Break 3:00–3:30 CONTENT MODELING 3:30–5:00 Exercise 4: Create Content Packages
  59. Paypal Business Nav Paypal Payments Standard Accept credit cards wherever _Choosing which content to include you do business. Get everything you need to accept credit cards from your customers. Online sales, invoicing, in-person and exclude payments… this solution securely handles them all. Get Started _Using headings as navigation labels Call: 1-888-818-3922 _Truncating body copy for summaries Watch a Demo Accept credit cards and PayPal on your _Resizing images website. (formerly Website Payments Standard) Start selling on your website with our secure payment buttons. You can set up your button in about 1... _Ensuring appropriate file formats Swipe credit cards with your free card reader. PayPal Here is a simple way to accept credit and _Presenting appropriate next steps debit cards, PayPal and even checks—anywhere you... Email your invoices for faster payment. Use your computer, smartphone or tablet to email professional looking invoices to your customers. Ad... Access your money quickly. When the order is complete, the money usually shows up in your PayPal account in a few minutes. From... Keep your costs down. Do right by your customers. Keep up with your payments. 88
  60. INVENTORY YOUR CONTENT SELECT CONTENT TO INCLUDE + EXCLUDE MODEL YOUR CONTENT DEFINE CONTENT PACKAGES
  61. TYPICAL CONTENT INVENTORY Inventories typically look at pages: _Page title, including the main title and what appears in the meta <title> tag _Content type or CMS template _Page URL _Content owner and/or person who last updated the page _Date the page was created and/or last updated _Keywords that describe the page _Page rank or number of visits
  62. Section Page Name Page Template URL Owner Last Update Keywords Page Rank Notes 0.0 Home Homepage Homepage 4/17/2012 1.0 Our Products Our Products Landing Page Landing page 6/18/2011 1.1 Our Products Acme Cage Mousetrap Product page 6/18/2011 All product pages contain description, image and specs 1.2 Our Products Acme Snap Mousetrap Product page 6/18/2011 1.3 Our Products Acme Glue Mousetrap Product page 6/18/2011 1.4 Our Products Acme Mouse Poison Product page 6/18/2011 1.5 Our Products Acme Live-Catch Mousetrap Product page 6/18/2011 1.6 Our Products Acme Bucket Trap Product page 6/18/2011 2.0 Our Services Our Services Landing Page Landing page 2.1 Our Services In-home Consultation Landing page 2.2.0 Our Services Rodent Control Services Landing page 2.2.1 Our Services Trap Setting and Removal Article Page 2.2.2 Our Services Rodenticide Sprays Article Page 2.2.3 Our Services Mouse Contraceptives Article Page 2.2.4 Our Services Varmint Hunting Article Page 2.2.5 Our Services Cat Rental Article Page 2.3 Our Services Request a Brochure Form Sends to Excel 3.0 News and Insights News and Insights Landing Editorially controlled page 4/17/2012 Page 3.1.0 News and Insights Pest Control Perspectives Listing Page 4/17/2012 3.1.1 News and Insights New Developments in Individual Whitepaper 4/1/2012 Possum Monitoring 3.1.2 News and Insights Improving Pest Management Individual Whitepaper 3/1/2012 and Reducing Pesticide Risks in Schools and Parks 3.1.3 News and Insights Is Pest Control for the Birds? Individual Whitepaper 2/1/2012 3.1.4 News and Insights Selling a Cheaper Individual Whitepaper 11/1/2011 Mousetrap: Entry and Competition in the Retail Sector 3.1.5 News and Insights Mouse control: Are Individual Whitepaper 10/1/2007
  63. CONTENT INVENTORY FOR MOBILE Mobile requires looking at chunks and page elements: _Character or word count for headlines, subheads, and page summaries _Character or word count for body copy _Image dimensions or standard crop ratios or cut sizes _Common modules reused across pages (for example, in the right column) which may need to be handled differently on mobile screens _Content format, especially .pdf, .doc, .ppt, or other document formats that won’t condense well on mobile screens _Use of Flash or any other technology that just won’t work on a mobile device
  64. CONTENT INVENTORY IN THE CMS Mobile requires understanding how content is stored in the CMS: _Are content objects stored as blobs with embedded formatting? _Are content objects chunked out into appropriately fielded entries? _Are the content chunks at the right level of granularity for mobile? _Does the CMS have the capability of targeting content at the field or component level?
  65. EXERCISE CONTENT INVENTORY Select a reasonably complex page (or set of pages) from PayPal or another site we’ve looked at. _Document what you can about each page. How would you get access to the information you can’t find just by looking at the page? _Document each content element on the page: • Can you easily identify the format for each object? • Do you need exact sizes or just a rough range? • How will you decide if it should be included?
  66. Page ID Section Page Name URL Owner First Published Last Updated Item ID Content Element Format Size Owner Include/Exclude Notes
  67. INVENTORY YOUR CONTENT SELECT CONTENT TO INCLUDE + EXCLUDE MODEL YOUR CONTENT DEFINE CONTENT PACKAGES
  68. RESPONSIVE VS. ADAPTIVE
  69. “ Responsive design is client-side, meaning the whole page is delivered to the device browser (the client), and the browser then changes how the page appears in relation to the dimensions of the browser window. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/garrett-goodman/adaptive-design_b_2344569.html
  70. RESPONSIVE DESIGN + CONTENT Must use exactly the same content as on the desktop Different front-end code supports different visual styles Can choose to exclude content, but... Dumb devices often still wind up downloading the full set of content
  71. “ Adaptive design is server-side, meaning before the page is even delivered, the server (where the site is hosted) detects the attributes of the device, and loads a version of the site that is optimized for its dimensions and native features. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/garrett-goodman/adaptive-design_b_2344569.html
  72. ADAPTIVE DESIGN + CONTENT In most cases, you still want to use the exact same content as on the desktop Can serve different content as needed, but... Your CMS has to support targeting content with business rules You have to maintain multiple instances
  73. NOT EITHER/OR BOTH + AND
  74. THE SIMPLEST POSSIBLE SOLUTION WHAT TO INCLUDE + EXCLUDE Include Exclude _Headers — especially to _Most illustrative thumbnail serve as navigation labels images (unless it’s required, _Body copy — if it’s short say for retail) enough to act as a teaser _Media in unsupported _Call to action links formats (Flash videos, complex infographics) _Header image _Large tables or charts You can change the way it looks, but you cannot change what it is.
  75. EXERCISE SELECT CONTENT TO INCLUDE For each of the following screens, identify which content elements you think should be included on a mobile screen (and which should be excluded.) _Draw an X through the content you wish to exclude. _Make notes about the content you choose to include: • Do you think you can get access to the content at that level of granularity in the CMS? • Is the desired content an appropriate size? Format? • Are there cases where you want or need certain content, but you must provide an alternative format?
  76. WHAT YOU’RE IN FOR MOBILE CONTENT STRATEGY INTRO 9:00–10:30 Exercise: Convince Your CEO Break 10:30–11:00 ADAPTIVE CONTENT 11:00–12:00 Exercise: State of the Mobile Web Lunch 12:00–1:30 CONTENT INVENTORY 1:30–3:00 Exercise: Select Content to Include + Exclude Break 3:00–3:30 CONTENT MODELING 3:30–5:00 Exercise 4: Create Content Packages
  77. INVENTORY YOUR CONTENT SELECT CONTENT TO INCLUDE + EXCLUDE MODEL YOUR CONTENT DEFINE CONTENT PACKAGES
  78. Content precedes design. Design in the absence of content is not design, it’s decoration. Jeffrey Zeldman, @zeldman
  79. CONTENT FIRST!
  80. “ It is unrealistic to write your content — or ask your client to write the content — before you design it. Most of the time. Content needs to be structured and structuring alters your content, designing alters content. It’s not “content then design” or “content or design.” It’s “content and design.” —Mark Boulton, @markboulton
  81. “ A lot of bad content management implementations homogenize vastly different content types into the same bland template. The problem in those situations, paradoxically, isn’t too much structure. It’s not enough structure. By defining more content types and modeling them more fully, we can strike the right balance between flexibility and uniformity. —Yes, I’m quoting myself. What of it?
  82. WHAT IS CONTENT MODELING? The process of turning all the “stuff” in the content on the site into a well-organized system of content types, attributes, and data-types. _What type of content is it? Article, product spec, recipe, slideshow... _What fields or content attributes need to be entered? _What limits are set on each field? Date format, image specs...
  83. EXERCISE CONTENT MODELING You will need to make decisions about how to break your content up into discrete elements for publishing to mobile. Keep the following in mind when identifying the properties of a given content type: _How should each content element be broken into fields? _What are requirements and rules for each element? _What constraints should be placed on the types of data stored in each element? _What “invisible” meta-data might be used to control related content or support dynamic publishing to mobile?
  84. INVENTORY YOUR CONTENT SELECT CONTENT TO INCLUDE + EXCLUDE MODEL YOUR CONTENT DEFINE CONTENT PACKAGES
  85. DON’T CREATE CONTENT FOR A SPECIFIC CONTEXT
  86. A PACKAGE OF IMAGE CROPS
  87. HEADLINES
  88. ARTICLE TITLE ARTICLE SIDEBAR SEO FACEBOOK TWITTER IPHONE ANDROID
  89. LENGTH 60 characters, 100 characters, 200 characters TONE + STYLE SEO-optimized, Colloqiual SUPERHEADS + SUBHEADS Combo packages
  90. SUMMARIES
  91. TRUNCATION IS NOT A CONTENT STRATE...
  92. PROGRESSIVE DISCLOSURE
  93. In its purest format, progressive disclosure means offering a good teaser.
  94. CALL-TO-ACTION LINKS
  95. Different application process — no online application for mobile Different handling of link to store — maps application on mobile Different toll free number — for tracking where leads originate Different content in the CMS
  96. BODY FIELDS AND PAGE BREAKS
  97. SCROLLING IS OKAY!
  98. ANCHOR LINKS
  99. SHOW/ HIDE
  100. EXERCISE CONTENT PACKAGES Design an editorial screen used to create and edit the PayPal screen we modeled. Remember to keep the following questions in mind: _What additional fields or attributes will be needed to support publishing in other channels? What sizes will give you the most flexibility? _Which content elements will require alternative fallbacks? How should those be managed? _Do you want to provide formatting buttons for some properties? What will happen to that formatting in other channels? _Will an editor familiar with the visual appearance of an article on the web site be comfortable with the editing screen? _Some properties are links to other content in the CMS —for example, images may live in an image management app. What tools would simplify the process of an editor managing these connections?
  101. TEN SIMPLE STEPS
  102. 1. Quit thinking you can just guess what subset of content a “mobile user” wants. You’re going to guess wrong.
  103. 2. Do your research, look at competitors, and evaluate your analytics data. Figure out how to convince the people with money that you need a content strategy for mobile.
  104. 3. Before jumping into imagining new mobile products, figure out how you can achieve content parity. Same content where you can, equivalent fallbacks where you can’t.
  105. 4. Use mobile as a catalyst to remove content that isn’t providing value. Edit or delete content to make the experience better for all your users — desktop and mobile.
  106. 5. Don’t create content for a specific context or platform. It’s not your desktop content, your mobile content, your tablet content, or even your print content. It’s just your content.
  107. 6. Develop a process and workflow that will support and enable maximum content reuse with minimum additional effort. That’s adaptive content.
  108. 7. Create content packages: a flexible system of content elements that cover a range of possible uses. Then manage and maintain those content elements all in one place.
  109. 8. Separate content from form and create presentation-independent content. Don’t encode meaning through visual styling — instead, add structure and metadata to your content.
  110. 9. Ensure that your content management tools make it easy — and possible — for your content creators to develop the content structures needed to support adaptive content.
  111. 10. Invest in CMS frameworks that support multi-channel publishing, and make sure your tools, processes, and workflow will support that.
  112. THANKS! @karenmcgrane karen@bondartscience.com www.bondartscience.com +1 (917) 887-8149
  113. I’M LOCAL I’m on the go and need local information.
  114. I’M BORED Pocket Robot. Entertain me!
  115. I’M INFOSEEKING I need an answer to a question. Now.
  116. Bored Bored Bored Infoseeking Infoseeking Local Infoseeking Bored 25% 31% Local Local Local Bored Infoseeking Infoseeking 44% Infoseeking Infoseeking Local Infoseeking Infoseeking
  117. EXERCISE WHAT ARE YOU SEARCHING FOR?
  118. CONTENT IS THE MAIN REASON WE USE OUR MOBILE DEVICES. (Aside from Angry Birds.)
  119. We’re about to usher in a golden age of PDFs on the iPad. Paul Ford, @ftrain
  120. “ Existing art and production staffers from the print side would be responsible for making two iPad layouts (one in portrait and one in landscape) on Adobe’s platform. —Condé Nast Is Experiencing Technical Difficulties
  121. All I see is an entire organization screaming, “WE WANT IT TO BE THE EIGHTIES DAMMIT.” Condé Nast Is Experiencing Technical Difficulties
  122. COPE: CREATE ONCE, PUBLISH EVERYWHERE COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere
  123. C O N T E N T P R O V I D E R S M U S I C P A R T N E R S NPR, Open Content and API’s, O’Reilly Oscon 175
  124. NPR.ORG NPR Digital Media Examples NPR, OpenCOPE and API’s, O’Reilly Oscon of Content
  125. NPR.ORG PLAYER NPR Digital Media Examples of COPE
  126. NPR NEWS iPHONE APP
  127. NPR MOBILE WEB SITE
  128. NPR ADDICT IPHONE APP Produced by a public user, based entirely on the NPR API
  129. NPR ON THE PUBLIC RADIO PLAYER
  130. NPR ON WBUR
  131. NPR ON MPR
  132. NPR ON iGOOGLE
  133. NPR IN iTUNES
  134. NPR’S CMS
  135. NPR’S API
  136. BUSINESS VALUE?
  137. 31,000 2010 iPAD ISSUE SALES 22,000 13,000 11,000 10,500 8,700 4,300 2,775 Sept. Nov. Sept. Nov. Sept. Nov. Sept. Nov.
  138. NPR PAGE VIEWS 88 Million 43 Million
  139. “ Over the last year, NPR’s total page view growth has increased by more than 80%. How did we get that much growth? Our API. —Zach Brand, Senior Director Technology, NPR
  140. “ The biggest impact that the API has made, however, is with our mobile strategy. The API has enabled NPR product owners to build specialized apps on a wide range of platforms and devices, liberating them from being dependent on custom development to access the content. Through this process, we built our iPhone and iPad apps, mobile sites, Android app and HTML5 site, some of which were turned around in a matter of weeks!
  141. Intelligent Flexible Structured Nimble Agile Adaptive Atomized Semantic
  142. WHY ARE NEWS ORGANIZATIONS THE INNOVATORS?
  143. Masthead Hed: Headline, heading, head or title of a story, rarely a complete sentence. Dek: Deck, blurb, or article teaser or sub-headline. A phrase or two between the headline and the body of the article that explains what the story is about. •Nut graf Lede: Lead, as in leading paragraph, usually the first sentence, or in some cases the first two Captions are photo headlines •Nutshell paragraph sentences, ideally 20-25 words in length. An Cutlines are the words (under the effective lead is a brief, sharp statement of the caption, if there is one) describing the •Summarizes the story's essential facts. photograph or illustration. story's content •Often bullet- Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer pointed adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy nibh euismod •Sometimes set tincidunt ut laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat off in a box volutpat. Ut wisi enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exerci tation ullamcorper suscipit lobortis nisl ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis autem vel eum iriure dolor in hendrerit in vulputate velit esse molestie consequat, vel illum dolore eu feugiat nulla facilisis at vero eros et accumsan et iusto odio dignissim qui blandit praesent luptatum zzril delenit augue duis dolore te feugait nulla facilisi.
  144. It’s scary to think about your package devolved into different content elements. It takes imagination and understanding to take that apart. And courage. Sarah Chubb Sauvayre, Condé Nast
  145. THE PRIMARY PLATFORM
  146. Thinking about where content will “live” on a “web page” is pretty 1999. Lisa Welchman, @lwelchman
  147. Metadata is the new art direction. Ethan Resnick, @studip101
  148. THE MARRIAGE OF CONTENT AND FORM
  149. STRUCTURE EXPRESSED THROUGH STYLING
  150. Content admins hate all the fields. But the reason they hate all the fields is the workflow is bad. Jason Pamental, @jpamental
  151. CMS IS THE ENTERPRISE SOFTWARE THAT UX FORGOT
  152. CONTEXTUAL INQUIRY USER PERSONAS USER SCENARIOS TASK ANALYSIS WORKFLOW MAPPING CARD SORTING CONTENT MODELING ITERATIVE PROTOTYPING USABILITY TESTING ANALYTICS DATA
  153. “ The happier people are, the better their content will be, the more content they’ll produce. —Patrick Cooper, NPR
  154. “ Beautiful software, even for back-end users, is becoming an expectation. We’re moving in this direction because we now understand that better content management systems foster better content. —Matt Thompson
  155. “ Traditional publishing and content management systems bind content to display and delivery mechanisms, which forces a recycling approach for multi-platform publishing. —Dan Willis
  156. “ A [decoupled] content publishing system creates well-defined chunks of content that can be combined in whatever way is most appropriate for a particular platform. All display issues are addressed by delivery applications, rather than by a content management system earlier in the process.

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  • Eighty-six percent of smartphone owners say they use their phone while watching television, and forty-one percent say they do it every day.\nSeventy-one percent of smartphone users say they&amp;#x2019;ve searched for more information on their mobile device after seeing an advertisement on TV, in print, or online.\n
  • Eighty-six percent of smartphone owners say they use their phone while watching television, and forty-one percent say they do it every day.\nSeventy-one percent of smartphone users say they&amp;#x2019;ve searched for more information on their mobile device after seeing an advertisement on TV, in print, or online.\n
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  • While in-store, thirty-seven percent decided not to buy the product at all and nineteen percent left the store and went online to buy the product.\nMobile web renders improperly in at least one of the major browsers 75% of the time. 84% of people who transact online report problems.\n
  • While in-store, thirty-seven percent decided not to buy the product at all and nineteen percent left the store and went online to buy the product.\nMobile web renders improperly in at least one of the major browsers 75% of the time. 84% of people who transact online report problems.\n
  • While in-store, thirty-seven percent decided not to buy the product at all and nineteen percent left the store and went online to buy the product.\nMobile web renders improperly in at least one of the major browsers 75% of the time. 84% of people who transact online report problems.\n
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  • Just because we all have iPhones and Retina displays and most important, a mental model of how a desktop site works when viewed thru a smaller viewport, doesn&amp;#x2019;t mean that everyone does\n\n
  • Just because we all have iPhones and Retina displays and most important, a mental model of how a desktop site works when viewed thru a smaller viewport, doesn&amp;#x2019;t mean that everyone does\n\n
  • Just because we all have iPhones and Retina displays and most important, a mental model of how a desktop site works when viewed thru a smaller viewport, doesn&amp;#x2019;t mean that everyone does\n\n
  • Just because we all have iPhones and Retina displays and most important, a mental model of how a desktop site works when viewed thru a smaller viewport, doesn&amp;#x2019;t mean that everyone does\n\n
  • Just because we all have iPhones and Retina displays and most important, a mental model of how a desktop site works when viewed thru a smaller viewport, doesn&amp;#x2019;t mean that everyone does\n\n
  • Just because we all have iPhones and Retina displays and most important, a mental model of how a desktop site works when viewed thru a smaller viewport, doesn&amp;#x2019;t mean that everyone does\n\n
  • Just because we all have iPhones and Retina displays and most important, a mental model of how a desktop site works when viewed thru a smaller viewport, doesn&amp;#x2019;t mean that everyone does\n\n
  • Just because we all have iPhones and Retina displays and most important, a mental model of how a desktop site works when viewed thru a smaller viewport, doesn&amp;#x2019;t mean that everyone does\n\n
  • Mobile phones are also a useful healthcare tool because they&amp;#x2019;re so ubiquitous across age groups, income levels, and ethnic groups. They&amp;#x2019;re especially powerful at reaching underserved populations, according to Pew Research \n
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  • eighty percent of those who bought a new phone in the previous three months chose to get a smartphone\nTeen smartphone owners say they&amp;#x2019;re less likely to have used a desktop computer than their peers who don&amp;#x2019;t have a smartphone\n\n
  • eighty percent of those who bought a new phone in the previous three months chose to get a smartphone\nTeen smartphone owners say they&amp;#x2019;re less likely to have used a desktop computer than their peers who don&amp;#x2019;t have a smartphone\n\n
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  • Tried to search for something on your phone, \nCLICK\nclicked the link, only to be dumped unceremoniously onto the homepage of the mobile site?\n\n
  • Tried to search for something on your phone, \nCLICK\nclicked the link, only to be dumped unceremoniously onto the homepage of the mobile site?\n\n
  • Tried to search for something on your phone, \nCLICK\nclicked the link, only to be dumped unceremoniously onto the homepage of the mobile site?\n\n
  • Tried to search for something on your phone, \nCLICK\nclicked the link, only to be dumped unceremoniously onto the homepage of the mobile site?\n\n
  • Tried to search for something on your phone, \nCLICK\nclicked the link, only to be dumped unceremoniously onto the homepage of the mobile site?\n\n
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  • Have you ever clicked a link on Facebook or Twitter, \nCLICK, WAIT\nonly to find that the website isn&apos;t available on your mobile device?\n\n
  • Have you ever clicked a link on Facebook or Twitter, \nCLICK, WAIT\nonly to find that the website isn&apos;t available on your mobile device?\n\n
  • Have you ever clicked a link on Facebook or Twitter, \nCLICK, WAIT\nonly to find that the website isn&apos;t available on your mobile device?\n\n
  • Have you ever clicked a link on Facebook or Twitter, \nCLICK, WAIT\nonly to find that the website isn&apos;t available on your mobile device?\n\n
  • Have you ever clicked a link on Facebook or Twitter, \nCLICK, WAIT\nonly to find that the website isn&apos;t available on your mobile device?\n\n
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  • Many of our problems in digital are design problems, but I don&amp;#x2019;t mean web design. I mean organization design problems. Digital is so new, we haven&amp;#x2019;t evolved enough to actually integrate new practices and behaviors into the way we work. That might take a generation.\nOrg structure is not destiny, but it does reflect how a business thinks about itself\nTons of value in trying to diagnose power relationships through the lens of org design\nTell my students to look at where a job reports into, what that implies for the culture, how much impact the role will have, how they will need to interact with other roles or departments\nFrustrated with low level &amp;#x201C;evangelists&amp;#x201D; asked to change the culture from below\n\n
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  • Ethan frames the problem that we can&amp;#x2019;t expect to support different designs and different codebases for every single platform and device.\n
  • So if designers and developers are telling us that we can&amp;#x2019;t afford to develop multiple &amp;#x201C;device optimized&amp;#x201D; interfaces, content people are saying the same thing: we can&amp;#x2019;t afford to create content for a single platform. \n\nAs Nic Newman says here, the solution on the content side is to put more structure into your content objects so that they can be more effectively reused.\n\n[twitter]Every publisher, and company that has to think like a publisher, should read The Nimble report by @rlovinger of @razorfish. http://nimble.razorfish.com[/twitter]\n
  • Content as a service\n
  • Reusable content: content has been developed to maximize reuse across platforms; where that&amp;#x2019;s impossible, different formats or types of content are available.\nStructured content: discrete content chunks can be combined in different ways for different platforms.\nPresentation-independent content: design decisions can be made by the platform, rather than having style and format imposed on the content.\nMeaningful metadata: category, tag, author, and date information can be used to filter or highlight content, and metadata can be used to help platforms decide which content to display.\nUsable CMS interfaces: content management UI and workflow encourages people to create well-structured and metadata-enhanced content, without letting them fall back on making styling choices.\n
  • Reusable content: content has been developed to maximize reuse across platforms; where that&amp;#x2019;s impossible, different formats or types of content are available.\nStructured content: discrete content chunks can be combined in different ways for different platforms.\nPresentation-independent content: design decisions can be made by the platform, rather than having style and format imposed on the content.\nMeaningful metadata: category, tag, author, and date information can be used to filter or highlight content, and metadata can be used to help platforms decide which content to display.\nUsable CMS interfaces: content management UI and workflow encourages people to create well-structured and metadata-enhanced content, without letting them fall back on making styling choices.\n
  • Reusable content: content has been developed to maximize reuse across platforms; where that&amp;#x2019;s impossible, different formats or types of content are available.\nStructured content: discrete content chunks can be combined in different ways for different platforms.\nPresentation-independent content: design decisions can be made by the platform, rather than having style and format imposed on the content.\nMeaningful metadata: category, tag, author, and date information can be used to filter or highlight content, and metadata can be used to help platforms decide which content to display.\nUsable CMS interfaces: content management UI and workflow encourages people to create well-structured and metadata-enhanced content, without letting them fall back on making styling choices.\n
  • Reusable content: content has been developed to maximize reuse across platforms; where that&amp;#x2019;s impossible, different formats or types of content are available.\nStructured content: discrete content chunks can be combined in different ways for different platforms.\nPresentation-independent content: design decisions can be made by the platform, rather than having style and format imposed on the content.\nMeaningful metadata: category, tag, author, and date information can be used to filter or highlight content, and metadata can be used to help platforms decide which content to display.\nUsable CMS interfaces: content management UI and workflow encourages people to create well-structured and metadata-enhanced content, without letting them fall back on making styling choices.\n
  • Reusable content: content has been developed to maximize reuse across platforms; where that&amp;#x2019;s impossible, different formats or types of content are available.\nStructured content: discrete content chunks can be combined in different ways for different platforms.\nPresentation-independent content: design decisions can be made by the platform, rather than having style and format imposed on the content.\nMeaningful metadata: category, tag, author, and date information can be used to filter or highlight content, and metadata can be used to help platforms decide which content to display.\nUsable CMS interfaces: content management UI and workflow encourages people to create well-structured and metadata-enhanced content, without letting them fall back on making styling choices.\n
  • Reusable content: content has been developed to maximize reuse across platforms; where that&amp;#x2019;s impossible, different formats or types of content are available.\nStructured content: discrete content chunks can be combined in different ways for different platforms.\nPresentation-independent content: design decisions can be made by the platform, rather than having style and format imposed on the content.\nMeaningful metadata: category, tag, author, and date information can be used to filter or highlight content, and metadata can be used to help platforms decide which content to display.\nUsable CMS interfaces: content management UI and workflow encourages people to create well-structured and metadata-enhanced content, without letting them fall back on making styling choices.\n
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  • Reusable content: content has been developed to maximize reuse across platforms; where that&amp;#x2019;s impossible, different formats or types of content are available.\nStructured content: discrete content chunks can be combined in different ways for different platforms.\nPresentation-independent content: design decisions can be made by the platform, rather than having style and format imposed on the content.\nMeaningful metadata: category, tag, author, and date information can be used to filter or highlight content, and metadata can be used to help platforms decide which content to display.\nUsable CMS interfaces: content management UI and workflow encourages people to create well-structured and metadata-enhanced content, without letting them fall back on making styling choices.\n
  • The problem is we have CMSes that permit &amp;#x2014; encourage &amp;#x2014; creating undifferentiated blobs of content. \nWe let people get away with having a &amp;#x201C;Microsoft Word-like&amp;#x201D; interface&amp;#x201D; with a WSIWYG toolbar. \nThis prevents people from creating content structures and couples content with form. \nA page created with a CMS like this will look exactly the way you want it to... in the context you created it for.\n\n[twitter]You know WYSIWYG editors suck. @rachelandrew tells you why: http://www.rachelandrew.co.uk/archives/2011/07/27/your-wysiwyg-editor-sucks/[/twitter]\n
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  • To me, this is the war between blobs of undifferentiated content, and chunks of well structured content.Support the chunks! Don&amp;#x2019;t let the blobs win!\n
  • Reusable content: content has been developed to maximize reuse across platforms; where that&amp;#x2019;s impossible, different formats or types of content are available.\nStructured content: discrete content chunks can be combined in different ways for different platforms.\nPresentation-independent content: design decisions can be made by the platform, rather than having style and format imposed on the content.\nMeaningful metadata: category, tag, author, and date information can be used to filter or highlight content, and metadata can be used to help platforms decide which content to display.\nUsable CMS interfaces: content management UI and workflow encourages people to create well-structured and metadata-enhanced content, without letting them fall back on making styling choices.\n
  • [twitter]In Cutting Through the Crap: The Essence of Content on the Future Web, @lyzadanger explains how to keep content free: https://speakerdeck.com/u/lyzadanger/p/cutting-through-the-crap-the-essence-of-content-on-the-future-web[/twitter]\n
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  • Reusable content: content has been developed to maximize reuse across platforms; where that&amp;#x2019;s impossible, different formats or types of content are available.\nStructured content: discrete content chunks can be combined in different ways for different platforms.\nPresentation-independent content: design decisions can be made by the platform, rather than having style and format imposed on the content.\nMeaningful metadata: category, tag, author, and date information can be used to filter or highlight content, and metadata can be used to help platforms decide which content to display.\nUsable CMS interfaces: content management UI and workflow encourages people to create well-structured and metadata-enhanced content, without letting them fall back on making styling choices.\n
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  • Guardian has dynamically generated topic pages\nMartin Belam said that one problem they had was that the main story couldn&amp;#x2019;t just be the most recent\nYou&amp;#x2019;d wind up with random stuff there\nSo they had to start creating editorial priorities, and now the top story is selected via an algorithm that looks at both importance and recency\n
  • Newspaper layout = editorial judgment.\nPlacement/size of articles provides semantic meaning.\nPrimary, secondary, tertiary tiers. [point out]\n\n[slow] THERE IS CONTENT IN DESIGN CHOICES.\nSo: how do we cook design choices into content,\nso that editorial judgment can transition platforms?\n\n[next] Experience reminds of print, but very iPad.\nBox-like presentation of Flipboard. Works.\nNOT JUST A LIST OF ARTICLES.\nLayout/size reflects choices of editors from print. [show]\n\nHow? THEY AUTOMATE IT.\nScript reads original indesign files where print issue designed.\nReads size &amp; placement of each article,\nencodes that into metadata of the content API.\n\nGive the robots metadata for editorial priority,\nbased on judgment of Guardian&amp;#x2019;s editors.\niPad app uses that info to make device-appropriate\ndecisions for how to place articles in app.\n\nResult: app uniquely iPad but carries meaning/values of print.\n\n\n\n\n[twitter]At The Guardian, robots read InDesign print layout, derive priority metadata to drive iPad layout. http://www.markporter.com/notebook/?p=1080[/twitter]\n\n
  • Newspaper layout = editorial judgment.\nPlacement/size of articles provides semantic meaning.\nPrimary, secondary, tertiary tiers. [point out]\n\n[slow] THERE IS CONTENT IN DESIGN CHOICES.\nSo: how do we cook design choices into content,\nso that editorial judgment can transition platforms?\n\n[next] Experience reminds of print, but very iPad.\nBox-like presentation of Flipboard. Works.\nNOT JUST A LIST OF ARTICLES.\nLayout/size reflects choices of editors from print. [show]\n\nHow? THEY AUTOMATE IT.\nScript reads original indesign files where print issue designed.\nReads size &amp; placement of each article,\nencodes that into metadata of the content API.\n\nGive the robots metadata for editorial priority,\nbased on judgment of Guardian&amp;#x2019;s editors.\niPad app uses that info to make device-appropriate\ndecisions for how to place articles in app.\n\nResult: app uniquely iPad but carries meaning/values of print.\n\n\n\n\n[twitter]At The Guardian, robots read InDesign print layout, derive priority metadata to drive iPad layout. http://www.markporter.com/notebook/?p=1080[/twitter]\n\n
  • Newspaper layout = editorial judgment.\nPlacement/size of articles provides semantic meaning.\nPrimary, secondary, tertiary tiers. [point out]\n\n[slow] THERE IS CONTENT IN DESIGN CHOICES.\nSo: how do we cook design choices into content,\nso that editorial judgment can transition platforms?\n\n[next] Experience reminds of print, but very iPad.\nBox-like presentation of Flipboard. Works.\nNOT JUST A LIST OF ARTICLES.\nLayout/size reflects choices of editors from print. [show]\n\nHow? THEY AUTOMATE IT.\nScript reads original indesign files where print issue designed.\nReads size &amp; placement of each article,\nencodes that into metadata of the content API.\n\nGive the robots metadata for editorial priority,\nbased on judgment of Guardian&amp;#x2019;s editors.\niPad app uses that info to make device-appropriate\ndecisions for how to place articles in app.\n\nResult: app uniquely iPad but carries meaning/values of print.\n\n\n\n\n[twitter]At The Guardian, robots read InDesign print layout, derive priority metadata to drive iPad layout. http://www.markporter.com/notebook/?p=1080[/twitter]\n\n
  • Newspaper layout = editorial judgment.\nPlacement/size of articles provides semantic meaning.\nPrimary, secondary, tertiary tiers. [point out]\n\n[slow] THERE IS CONTENT IN DESIGN CHOICES.\nSo: how do we cook design choices into content,\nso that editorial judgment can transition platforms?\n\n[next] Experience reminds of print, but very iPad.\nBox-like presentation of Flipboard. Works.\nNOT JUST A LIST OF ARTICLES.\nLayout/size reflects choices of editors from print. [show]\n\nHow? THEY AUTOMATE IT.\nScript reads original indesign files where print issue designed.\nReads size &amp; placement of each article,\nencodes that into metadata of the content API.\n\nGive the robots metadata for editorial priority,\nbased on judgment of Guardian&amp;#x2019;s editors.\niPad app uses that info to make device-appropriate\ndecisions for how to place articles in app.\n\nResult: app uniquely iPad but carries meaning/values of print.\n\n\n\n\n[twitter]At The Guardian, robots read InDesign print layout, derive priority metadata to drive iPad layout. http://www.markporter.com/notebook/?p=1080[/twitter]\n\n
  • Newspaper layout = editorial judgment.\nPlacement/size of articles provides semantic meaning.\nPrimary, secondary, tertiary tiers. [point out]\n\n[slow] THERE IS CONTENT IN DESIGN CHOICES.\nSo: how do we cook design choices into content,\nso that editorial judgment can transition platforms?\n\n[next] Experience reminds of print, but very iPad.\nBox-like presentation of Flipboard. Works.\nNOT JUST A LIST OF ARTICLES.\nLayout/size reflects choices of editors from print. [show]\n\nHow? THEY AUTOMATE IT.\nScript reads original indesign files where print issue designed.\nReads size &amp; placement of each article,\nencodes that into metadata of the content API.\n\nGive the robots metadata for editorial priority,\nbased on judgment of Guardian&amp;#x2019;s editors.\niPad app uses that info to make device-appropriate\ndecisions for how to place articles in app.\n\nResult: app uniquely iPad but carries meaning/values of print.\n\n\n\n\n[twitter]At The Guardian, robots read InDesign print layout, derive priority metadata to drive iPad layout. http://www.markporter.com/notebook/?p=1080[/twitter]\n\n
  • Newspaper layout = editorial judgment.\nPlacement/size of articles provides semantic meaning.\nPrimary, secondary, tertiary tiers. [point out]\n\n[slow] THERE IS CONTENT IN DESIGN CHOICES.\nSo: how do we cook design choices into content,\nso that editorial judgment can transition platforms?\n\n[next] Experience reminds of print, but very iPad.\nBox-like presentation of Flipboard. Works.\nNOT JUST A LIST OF ARTICLES.\nLayout/size reflects choices of editors from print. [show]\n\nHow? THEY AUTOMATE IT.\nScript reads original indesign files where print issue designed.\nReads size &amp; placement of each article,\nencodes that into metadata of the content API.\n\nGive the robots metadata for editorial priority,\nbased on judgment of Guardian&amp;#x2019;s editors.\niPad app uses that info to make device-appropriate\ndecisions for how to place articles in app.\n\nResult: app uniquely iPad but carries meaning/values of print.\n\n\n\n\n[twitter]At The Guardian, robots read InDesign print layout, derive priority metadata to drive iPad layout. http://www.markporter.com/notebook/?p=1080[/twitter]\n\n
  • Newspaper layout = editorial judgment.\nPlacement/size of articles provides semantic meaning.\nPrimary, secondary, tertiary tiers. [point out]\n\n[slow] THERE IS CONTENT IN DESIGN CHOICES.\nSo: how do we cook design choices into content,\nso that editorial judgment can transition platforms?\n\n[next] Experience reminds of print, but very iPad.\nBox-like presentation of Flipboard. Works.\nNOT JUST A LIST OF ARTICLES.\nLayout/size reflects choices of editors from print. [show]\n\nHow? THEY AUTOMATE IT.\nScript reads original indesign files where print issue designed.\nReads size &amp; placement of each article,\nencodes that into metadata of the content API.\n\nGive the robots metadata for editorial priority,\nbased on judgment of Guardian&amp;#x2019;s editors.\niPad app uses that info to make device-appropriate\ndecisions for how to place articles in app.\n\nResult: app uniquely iPad but carries meaning/values of print.\n\n\n\n\n[twitter]At The Guardian, robots read InDesign print layout, derive priority metadata to drive iPad layout. http://www.markporter.com/notebook/?p=1080[/twitter]\n\n
  • Reusable content: content has been developed to maximize reuse across platforms; where that&amp;#x2019;s impossible, different formats or types of content are available.\nStructured content: discrete content chunks can be combined in different ways for different platforms.\nPresentation-independent content: design decisions can be made by the platform, rather than having style and format imposed on the content.\nMeaningful metadata: category, tag, author, and date information can be used to filter or highlight content, and metadata can be used to help platforms decide which content to display.\nUsable CMS interfaces: content management UI and workflow encourages people to create well-structured and metadata-enhanced content, without letting them fall back on making styling choices.\n
  • Creating structured content means having a bunch of fields for chunks and metadata in the interface.\nPeople bitch about this. They hate it. They beg for a blob and a WYSIWYG toolbar.\nThe solution isn&amp;#x2019;t to give in and make it more like Microsoft Word.The solution is to fix the CMS workflow problems.\n[twitter]You&amp;#x2019;ll never deliver a great experience for users if you don&amp;#x2019;t have a great experience for content creators. http://www.archive.org/details/drupalconchi_day2_baby_got_backend[/twitter]\n
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  • Reusable content: content has been developed to maximize reuse across platforms; where that&amp;#x2019;s impossible, different formats or types of content are available.\nStructured content: discrete content chunks can be combined in different ways for different platforms.\nPresentation-independent content: design decisions can be made by the platform, rather than having style and format imposed on the content.\nMeaningful metadata: category, tag, author, and date information can be used to filter or highlight content, and metadata can be used to help platforms decide which content to display.\nUsable CMS interfaces: content management UI and workflow encourages people to create well-structured and metadata-enhanced content, without letting them fall back on making styling choices.\n
  • Reusable content: content has been developed to maximize reuse across platforms; where that&amp;#x2019;s impossible, different formats or types of content are available.\nStructured content: discrete content chunks can be combined in different ways for different platforms.\nPresentation-independent content: design decisions can be made by the platform, rather than having style and format imposed on the content.\nMeaningful metadata: category, tag, author, and date information can be used to filter or highlight content, and metadata can be used to help platforms decide which content to display.\nUsable CMS interfaces: content management UI and workflow encourages people to create well-structured and metadata-enhanced content, without letting them fall back on making styling choices.\n
  • Reusable content: content has been developed to maximize reuse across platforms; where that&amp;#x2019;s impossible, different formats or types of content are available.\nStructured content: discrete content chunks can be combined in different ways for different platforms.\nPresentation-independent content: design decisions can be made by the platform, rather than having style and format imposed on the content.\nMeaningful metadata: category, tag, author, and date information can be used to filter or highlight content, and metadata can be used to help platforms decide which content to display.\nUsable CMS interfaces: content management UI and workflow encourages people to create well-structured and metadata-enhanced content, without letting them fall back on making styling choices.\n
  • Reusable content: content has been developed to maximize reuse across platforms; where that&amp;#x2019;s impossible, different formats or types of content are available.\nStructured content: discrete content chunks can be combined in different ways for different platforms.\nPresentation-independent content: design decisions can be made by the platform, rather than having style and format imposed on the content.\nMeaningful metadata: category, tag, author, and date information can be used to filter or highlight content, and metadata can be used to help platforms decide which content to display.\nUsable CMS interfaces: content management UI and workflow encourages people to create well-structured and metadata-enhanced content, without letting them fall back on making styling choices.\n
  • Reusable content: content has been developed to maximize reuse across platforms; where that&amp;#x2019;s impossible, different formats or types of content are available.\nStructured content: discrete content chunks can be combined in different ways for different platforms.\nPresentation-independent content: design decisions can be made by the platform, rather than having style and format imposed on the content.\nMeaningful metadata: category, tag, author, and date information can be used to filter or highlight content, and metadata can be used to help platforms decide which content to display.\nUsable CMS interfaces: content management UI and workflow encourages people to create well-structured and metadata-enhanced content, without letting them fall back on making styling choices.\n
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  • Reusable content: content has been developed to maximize reuse across platforms; where that&amp;#x2019;s impossible, different formats or types of content are available.\nStructured content: discrete content chunks can be combined in different ways for different platforms.\nPresentation-independent content: design decisions can be made by the platform, rather than having style and format imposed on the content.\nMeaningful metadata: category, tag, author, and date information can be used to filter or highlight content, and metadata can be used to help platforms decide which content to display.\nUsable CMS interfaces: content management UI and workflow encourages people to create well-structured and metadata-enhanced content, without letting them fall back on making styling choices.\n
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  • Reusable content: content has been developed to maximize reuse across platforms; where that&amp;#x2019;s impossible, different formats or types of content are available.\nStructured content: discrete content chunks can be combined in different ways for different platforms.\nPresentation-independent content: design decisions can be made by the platform, rather than having style and format imposed on the content.\nMeaningful metadata: category, tag, author, and date information can be used to filter or highlight content, and metadata can be used to help platforms decide which content to display.\nUsable CMS interfaces: content management UI and workflow encourages people to create well-structured and metadata-enhanced content, without letting them fall back on making styling choices.\n
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  • The idea that we can just show the first few lines of what we put on a desktop site is foolish. We have to get people writing for reuse and creating smaller content elements.\n
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  • Reusable content: content has been developed to maximize reuse across platforms; where that&amp;#x2019;s impossible, different formats or types of content are available.\nStructured content: discrete content chunks can be combined in different ways for different platforms.\nPresentation-independent content: design decisions can be made by the platform, rather than having style and format imposed on the content.\nMeaningful metadata: category, tag, author, and date information can be used to filter or highlight content, and metadata can be used to help platforms decide which content to display.\nUsable CMS interfaces: content management UI and workflow encourages people to create well-structured and metadata-enhanced content, without letting them fall back on making styling choices.\n
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  • If you have analytics, pay attention to them just as ecommerce sites would pay attention to shopping cart analytics. How often to people start creating content and stop, why? For teams, do you know how long it takes them to create content? Where are the problems? What are their pain points? Chances are it&apos;s not &quot;Oh, Drupal is ugly.&quot; \n\n\n
  • Roleplay, act out the workflow, see where they hang up, see where they grimace. Don&apos;t JUST simulate the online stuff, simulate the offline components of their work, too. Where are the roadblocks?\n\n\n\n
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  • If your system is older than six months, your content creators have probably found uses for it you don&apos;t know about.\nMyspace&apos;s CSS jammed into profile fields, &quot;Oh, we&apos;ve been using the Alt text for something else entirely,&quot; etc.\n\n
  • If it&apos;s a new site this even more important -- there&apos;s often not enough existing data for people to look for best practices, and they just muck with it until it does what they want it to.)\n
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  • There&apos;s a big difference between essential workflow and learned workarounds to old systems. \nDelicate balance between presenting them with a better approach than they&apos;re used to... and berating them into accepting a solution.\nBuilding oysters around pearls is never useful. Asking &amp;#x201C;Why&amp;#x201D; is the Answer to Stockholm Syndrome.\n
  • Iterate, iterate, iterate. Fast-and-crappy turns to polished-and-good with time and feedback from the users. \nBuilding content tools without feedback is like optimizing code without without metrics or profiling data. Flying blind.\n\n
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  • Don&apos;t optimize the individual pieces without addressing the workflow. \n\nTrain, simulate, roleplay. Do the intuitive pieces turn baffling when content editors have to pull the pieces together? It&apos;s easy to be penny-wise pound-foolish. \n\n\n
  • Drupal&apos;s emphasis on metadata and connections between pieces of content makes it easy to miss how mind-boggling the TASK is, because each one of the 15 screens is &quot;easy&quot; \n\n
  • Wrapper forms that build and save nodes behind the scenes. \nSingle-step forms to create an episode and a cluster of articles, galleries, etc.\nOverview screens that let \n
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  • Just naming the labels carefully and arranging things in the right tabs is huge. This is a classic UX/IA task. \n\nJust because it&amp;#x2019;s not a difficult technical problem to solve doesn&amp;#x2019;t mean it&amp;#x2019;s not important.\n
  • Place similar Fields in a consistent place across all Screens.\nMuscle memory and visual patterns are important. NO ONE READS HELP TEXT.\nGrouping implies purpose: having the same groups even when fields differ from site to site\n&apos;Manage this&apos; works on every page on the site, it just presents context-relevant &apos;Manage&apos; options.) \nManaging things is the same TASK even if it&apos;s different DATA. Admins only care about their tasks.\n
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  • [twitter]Want more from me on the subject of adaptive content? Check out my roundup of links, interviews and presentations: http://karenmcgrane.com/2011/12/14/mobile-content-strategy/[/twitter]\n
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  • They are not just repurposing their content! They are repurposing the art direction!\n\nWhen the iPad first launched, I was talking about it with the great Paul Ford, formerly of Harpers, and he said: we&amp;#x2019;re about to usher in a golden age of PDFs on the iPad.\n
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  • [twitter]More about Conde Nast&apos;s iPad strategy, as outlined by Executive Editor of Digital Magazine Development, Scott Dadich: http://www.observer.com/2011/07/scott-dadich-ipad-conde-nast/[/twitter]\n
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  • [twitter]Content portability must live at the CMS level: http://blog.programmableweb.com/2009/11/11/content-portability-building-an-api-is-not-enough/[/twitter]\n
  • [twitter]Content portability must live at the CMS level: http://blog.programmableweb.com/2009/11/11/content-portability-building-an-api-is-not-enough/[/twitter]\n
  • [twitter]Content portability must live at the CMS level: http://blog.programmableweb.com/2009/11/11/content-portability-building-an-api-is-not-enough/[/twitter]\n
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  • An iPhone app that offers streaming audio from more than 500 public radio stations streams across the United States.\n
  • WBUR in Boston\n
  • MPR in Minneapolis\n
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  • [twitter]All the numbers about Conde Nast&apos;s iPad issue sales, from Adweek: http://www.adweek.com/news/technology/breaking-down-cond-nasts-e-sales-133807[/twitter]\n
  • [twitter]All the numbers about Conde Nast&apos;s iPad issue sales, from Adweek: http://www.adweek.com/news/technology/breaking-down-cond-nasts-e-sales-133807[/twitter]\n
  • [twitter]All the numbers about Conde Nast&apos;s iPad issue sales, from Adweek: http://www.adweek.com/news/technology/breaking-down-cond-nasts-e-sales-133807[/twitter]\n
  • [twitter]All the numbers about Conde Nast&apos;s iPad issue sales, from Adweek: http://www.adweek.com/news/technology/breaking-down-cond-nasts-e-sales-133807[/twitter]\n
  • [twitter]All the numbers about Conde Nast&apos;s iPad issue sales, from Adweek: http://www.adweek.com/news/technology/breaking-down-cond-nasts-e-sales-133807[/twitter]\n
  • [twitter]All the numbers about Conde Nast&apos;s iPad issue sales, from Adweek: http://www.adweek.com/news/technology/breaking-down-cond-nasts-e-sales-133807[/twitter]\n
  • [twitter]All the numbers about Conde Nast&apos;s iPad issue sales, from Adweek: http://www.adweek.com/news/technology/breaking-down-cond-nasts-e-sales-133807[/twitter]\n
  • [twitter]All the numbers about Conde Nast&apos;s iPad issue sales, from Adweek: http://www.adweek.com/news/technology/breaking-down-cond-nasts-e-sales-133807[/twitter]\n
  • [twitter]All the numbers about Conde Nast&apos;s iPad issue sales, from Adweek: http://www.adweek.com/news/technology/breaking-down-cond-nasts-e-sales-133807[/twitter]\n
  • [twitter]Can&amp;#x2019;t get enough of this NPR case study? Lots more links here: http://pinboard.in/u:kmcgrane/t:npr/[/twitter]\n
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  • [twitter]You can listen to me and buy @arockley&amp;#x2019;s new book at the same time. DO IT.&amp;#xA0;http://www.amazon.com/Managing-Enterprise-Content-Unified-Strategy/dp/032181536X/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpt_1[/twitter]\n
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  • [twitter]We&amp;#x2019;re moving toward a web that&amp;#x2019;s more fluid, less fixed, and on a multitude of devices, says @sara_ann_marie: http://www.alistapart.com/articles/future-ready-content/[/twitter]\n
  • [twitter]We&amp;#x2019;re moving toward a web that&amp;#x2019;s more fluid, less fixed, and on a multitude of devices, says @sara_ann_marie: http://www.alistapart.com/articles/future-ready-content/[/twitter]\n
  • [twitter]It&amp;#x2019;s almost impossible for some publishers and editors to envision content separate from presentation. http://scholarlykitchen.sspnet.org/2010/05/24/when-did-print-become-an-input/[/twitter]\n
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  • When I talk about metadata, I mean it in the broadest possible sense. \nSecond thing we have to do is make metadata seem sexy. Okay, if not sexy, then at least not so scary.\nExplain to people why they need to add extra fields to their content, or extra markup for semantic tags.\n
  • The best summation of this concept comes from a guy named Ethan Resnick, who explained &amp;#x201C;Metadata is the new art direction.&amp;#x201D; \n\nWhat this means is that the art of constructing pages or sites or apps is now not just about making custom designed layouts. It&amp;#x2019;s about figuring out how to to use logic, business rules, search queries and metadata to build dynamically generated pages. \n\n[twitter]Use structured content and rule-based art direction for multi-platform styling, says @studip101: http://www.mymorguefile.com/blog/ruleBasedArtDirection.html[/twitter]\n
  • The best summation of this concept comes from a guy named Ethan Resnick, who explained &amp;#x201C;Metadata is the new art direction.&amp;#x201D; \n\nWhat this means is that the art of constructing pages or sites or apps is now not just about making custom designed layouts. It&amp;#x2019;s about figuring out how to to use logic, business rules, search queries and metadata to build dynamically generated pages. \n\n[twitter]Use structured content and rule-based art direction for multi-platform styling, says @studip101: http://www.mymorguefile.com/blog/ruleBasedArtDirection.html[/twitter]\n
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  • Guardian has dynamically generated topic pages\nMartin Belam said that one problem they had was that the main story couldn&amp;#x2019;t just be the most recent\nYou&amp;#x2019;d wind up with random stuff there\nSo they had to start creating editorial priorities, and now the top story is selected via an algorithm that looks at both importance and recency\n
  • Newspaper layout = editorial judgment.\nPlacement/size of articles provides semantic meaning.\nPrimary, secondary, tertiary tiers. [point out]\n\n[slow] THERE IS CONTENT IN DESIGN CHOICES.\nSo: how do we cook design choices into content,\nso that editorial judgment can transition platforms?\n\n[next] Experience reminds of print, but very iPad.\nBox-like presentation of Flipboard. Works.\nNOT JUST A LIST OF ARTICLES.\nLayout/size reflects choices of editors from print. [show]\n\nHow? THEY AUTOMATE IT.\nScript reads original indesign files where print issue designed.\nReads size &amp; placement of each article,\nencodes that into metadata of the content API.\n\nGive the robots metadata for editorial priority,\nbased on judgment of Guardian&amp;#x2019;s editors.\niPad app uses that info to make device-appropriate\ndecisions for how to place articles in app.\n\nResult: app uniquely iPad but carries meaning/values of print.\n\n\n\n\n[twitter]At The Guardian, robots read InDesign print layout, derive priority metadata to drive iPad layout. http://www.markporter.com/notebook/?p=1080[/twitter]\n\n
  • Newspaper layout = editorial judgment.\nPlacement/size of articles provides semantic meaning.\nPrimary, secondary, tertiary tiers. [point out]\n\n[slow] THERE IS CONTENT IN DESIGN CHOICES.\nSo: how do we cook design choices into content,\nso that editorial judgment can transition platforms?\n\n[next] Experience reminds of print, but very iPad.\nBox-like presentation of Flipboard. Works.\nNOT JUST A LIST OF ARTICLES.\nLayout/size reflects choices of editors from print. [show]\n\nHow? THEY AUTOMATE IT.\nScript reads original indesign files where print issue designed.\nReads size &amp; placement of each article,\nencodes that into metadata of the content API.\n\nGive the robots metadata for editorial priority,\nbased on judgment of Guardian&amp;#x2019;s editors.\niPad app uses that info to make device-appropriate\ndecisions for how to place articles in app.\n\nResult: app uniquely iPad but carries meaning/values of print.\n\n\n\n\n[twitter]At The Guardian, robots read InDesign print layout, derive priority metadata to drive iPad layout. http://www.markporter.com/notebook/?p=1080[/twitter]\n\n
  • Newspaper layout = editorial judgment.\nPlacement/size of articles provides semantic meaning.\nPrimary, secondary, tertiary tiers. [point out]\n\n[slow] THERE IS CONTENT IN DESIGN CHOICES.\nSo: how do we cook design choices into content,\nso that editorial judgment can transition platforms?\n\n[next] Experience reminds of print, but very iPad.\nBox-like presentation of Flipboard. Works.\nNOT JUST A LIST OF ARTICLES.\nLayout/size reflects choices of editors from print. [show]\n\nHow? THEY AUTOMATE IT.\nScript reads original indesign files where print issue designed.\nReads size &amp; placement of each article,\nencodes that into metadata of the content API.\n\nGive the robots metadata for editorial priority,\nbased on judgment of Guardian&amp;#x2019;s editors.\niPad app uses that info to make device-appropriate\ndecisions for how to place articles in app.\n\nResult: app uniquely iPad but carries meaning/values of print.\n\n\n\n\n[twitter]At The Guardian, robots read InDesign print layout, derive priority metadata to drive iPad layout. http://www.markporter.com/notebook/?p=1080[/twitter]\n\n
  • Newspaper layout = editorial judgment.\nPlacement/size of articles provides semantic meaning.\nPrimary, secondary, tertiary tiers. [point out]\n\n[slow] THERE IS CONTENT IN DESIGN CHOICES.\nSo: how do we cook design choices into content,\nso that editorial judgment can transition platforms?\n\n[next] Experience reminds of print, but very iPad.\nBox-like presentation of Flipboard. Works.\nNOT JUST A LIST OF ARTICLES.\nLayout/size reflects choices of editors from print. [show]\n\nHow? THEY AUTOMATE IT.\nScript reads original indesign files where print issue designed.\nReads size &amp; placement of each article,\nencodes that into metadata of the content API.\n\nGive the robots metadata for editorial priority,\nbased on judgment of Guardian&amp;#x2019;s editors.\niPad app uses that info to make device-appropriate\ndecisions for how to place articles in app.\n\nResult: app uniquely iPad but carries meaning/values of print.\n\n\n\n\n[twitter]At The Guardian, robots read InDesign print layout, derive priority metadata to drive iPad layout. http://www.markporter.com/notebook/?p=1080[/twitter]\n\n
  • Newspaper layout = editorial judgment.\nPlacement/size of articles provides semantic meaning.\nPrimary, secondary, tertiary tiers. [point out]\n\n[slow] THERE IS CONTENT IN DESIGN CHOICES.\nSo: how do we cook design choices into content,\nso that editorial judgment can transition platforms?\n\n[next] Experience reminds of print, but very iPad.\nBox-like presentation of Flipboard. Works.\nNOT JUST A LIST OF ARTICLES.\nLayout/size reflects choices of editors from print. [show]\n\nHow? THEY AUTOMATE IT.\nScript reads original indesign files where print issue designed.\nReads size &amp; placement of each article,\nencodes that into metadata of the content API.\n\nGive the robots metadata for editorial priority,\nbased on judgment of Guardian&amp;#x2019;s editors.\niPad app uses that info to make device-appropriate\ndecisions for how to place articles in app.\n\nResult: app uniquely iPad but carries meaning/values of print.\n\n\n\n\n[twitter]At The Guardian, robots read InDesign print layout, derive priority metadata to drive iPad layout. http://www.markporter.com/notebook/?p=1080[/twitter]\n\n
  • Newspaper layout = editorial judgment.\nPlacement/size of articles provides semantic meaning.\nPrimary, secondary, tertiary tiers. [point out]\n\n[slow] THERE IS CONTENT IN DESIGN CHOICES.\nSo: how do we cook design choices into content,\nso that editorial judgment can transition platforms?\n\n[next] Experience reminds of print, but very iPad.\nBox-like presentation of Flipboard. Works.\nNOT JUST A LIST OF ARTICLES.\nLayout/size reflects choices of editors from print. [show]\n\nHow? THEY AUTOMATE IT.\nScript reads original indesign files where print issue designed.\nReads size &amp; placement of each article,\nencodes that into metadata of the content API.\n\nGive the robots metadata for editorial priority,\nbased on judgment of Guardian&amp;#x2019;s editors.\niPad app uses that info to make device-appropriate\ndecisions for how to place articles in app.\n\nResult: app uniquely iPad but carries meaning/values of print.\n\n\n\n\n[twitter]At The Guardian, robots read InDesign print layout, derive priority metadata to drive iPad layout. http://www.markporter.com/notebook/?p=1080[/twitter]\n\n
  • Newspaper layout = editorial judgment.\nPlacement/size of articles provides semantic meaning.\nPrimary, secondary, tertiary tiers. [point out]\n\n[slow] THERE IS CONTENT IN DESIGN CHOICES.\nSo: how do we cook design choices into content,\nso that editorial judgment can transition platforms?\n\n[next] Experience reminds of print, but very iPad.\nBox-like presentation of Flipboard. Works.\nNOT JUST A LIST OF ARTICLES.\nLayout/size reflects choices of editors from print. [show]\n\nHow? THEY AUTOMATE IT.\nScript reads original indesign files where print issue designed.\nReads size &amp; placement of each article,\nencodes that into metadata of the content API.\n\nGive the robots metadata for editorial priority,\nbased on judgment of Guardian&amp;#x2019;s editors.\niPad app uses that info to make device-appropriate\ndecisions for how to place articles in app.\n\nResult: app uniquely iPad but carries meaning/values of print.\n\n\n\n\n[twitter]At The Guardian, robots read InDesign print layout, derive priority metadata to drive iPad layout. http://www.markporter.com/notebook/?p=1080[/twitter]\n\n
  • If we&amp;#x2019;re going to deliver on this promise, we need better CMS interfaces.\nThe future of mobile, the future of personalization, the future of content\nAll runs through the future of better content management.\n\n[twitter]Bloated, tangled CMS platforms are reviled by the editors who publish on them and the IT staff that maintain them. http://www.adweek.com/news/press/trouble-back-ends-133917[/twitter]\n\n
  • What IS crappy about drupal that better tools don&apos;t automatically fix? Workflow, information overload (too much data, too hard to find), too many fields, too many clicks, too many screens...\n\n(current image is from http://ashotofjd.com/post/90368907/worst-user-interface-ever-via)\n
  • Creating structured content means having a bunch of fields for chunks and metadata in the interface.\nPeople bitch about this. They hate it. They beg for a blob and a WYSIWYG toolbar.\nThe solution isn&amp;#x2019;t to give in and make it more like Microsoft Word.The solution is to fix the CMS workflow problems.\n[twitter]You&amp;#x2019;ll never deliver a great experience for users if you don&amp;#x2019;t have a great experience for content creators. http://www.archive.org/details/drupalconchi_day2_baby_got_backend[/twitter]\n
  • Creating structured content means having a bunch of fields for chunks and metadata in the interface.\nPeople bitch about this. They hate it. They beg for a blob and a WYSIWYG toolbar.\nThe solution isn&amp;#x2019;t to give in and make it more like Microsoft Word.The solution is to fix the CMS workflow problems.\n[twitter]You&amp;#x2019;ll never deliver a great experience for users if you don&amp;#x2019;t have a great experience for content creators. http://www.archive.org/details/drupalconchi_day2_baby_got_backend[/twitter]\n
  • UX would never be content to deliver software, even enterprise software, that wasn&amp;#x2019;t designed around the user.\nWell, for a CMS, the user is the content creator, and we need to do better.\n\nBecause, see, if you are in the business of creating content &amp;#x2014; and these days, who isn&amp;#x2019;t? &amp;#x2014; then the efficiency of your content workflow directly contributes to value for your business. \n
  • Do you know anyone who&amp;#x2019;s looking at analytics data on the performance of their CMS? I don&amp;#x2019;t.\nIf you were running an ecommerce site, you would optimize the hell out of those workflows. Delays, dropoffs, timeouts, errors: all result in lost revenue.\nIf you&apos;re a content-focused business, your content workflow is like an ecommerce workflow. And we have to start doing a better job of designing CMS interfaces for the people who use them.\n\n
  • This means we need to evaluate potential CMSes based on more than technical architecture, feature checklists, more than just the system requirements, security requirements and support requirements.\n
  • We have to stop talking about &amp;#x201C;usability&amp;#x201D; in CMSes as being about having a WYSIWYG toolbar, cute interface widgets, or an attractive font and color palette. Those things are nice, but true usability comes from understanding the complexity of the workflow: how the content is structured, what metadata is in place, and how pages get built dynamically based off business rules.\n
  • We have all kinds of tools in our UX toolkit that we can put to work on designing better content management interfaces and workflows.\n
  • I&amp;#x2019;m not saying we need to do this just because I care about the people who create content &amp;#x2014; though I do, I want them to be happy.\n
  • I&amp;#x2019;m saying this because if you give people better tools to use, if you remove the pain points from their daily workflow, they will do better work. They will create more and better content. And that means value to the business.\n\n[twitter]CMS requires continual investment, development. No matter how small or large your org is, your CMS has to evolve. http://www.poynter.org/how-tos/digital-strategies/134791/4-ways-content-management-systems-are-evolving-why-it-matters-to-journalists/[/twitter]\n
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  • [twitter]Content forking is a forking nightmare. Many solutions for mobile are trying to solve problems in the CMS. http://www.netmagazine.com/opinions/separate-mobile-website-no-forking-way[/twitter]\n
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  • [twitter]Your CMS is designed to support the delivery platform, not to support the author experience, says @uxcrank. http://dswillis.com/uxcrank/?p=378[/twitter]\n
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