Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

2

Share

Download to read offline

April 2018 newsletter

Download to read offline

UK Adjudicators April 2018 newsletter

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

April 2018 newsletter

  1. 1.   WWW.UKADJUDICATORS.CO.UK  APRIL 2018 NEWSLETTER    1 | P a g e       EDITORS COMMENTS  As we enter April it feels as though a third of  the year has flown by, but for contractors and  subcontractors  the  passage  of  four  months  can  seem  like  a  lifetime  where  they  have  payment and cash flow issues.  A  lot  of  the  international  adjudication  schemes in common law countries have only  focussed on this issue and limit what disputes  can be referred to the adjudicator. As part of  this  months  newsletter  we  take  a  look  at  overseas schemes and contrast them with the  current UK situation.  The  government  consultation  on  retention  and the amendments to the construction act   has  not  yet  reported  its  findings  and  the  approach  of  the  government  is  not  yet  clear  but  there  are  certainly  calls  to  improve  the  poor  drafting  of  the  payment  provisions  and  the  removal  of  the  power  and  process  exemptions.  Sean  Gibbs  LLB(Hons)MICE  FCIOB  FRICS  FCIARB,  is  a  director  with  Qualsurv  International  and  is  available  to  serve  as  an  arbitrator,  adjudicator,  mediator,  quantum  expert and dispute board member.  sean.gibbs@qualsurv.co.uk       SMASH  AND  GRAB?  HOW  ABOUT  SMASH AND GRAB PLUS?   On  a  daily  basis,  I  seem  to  read  something  about the “Smash and Grab” adjudication and  whether it is still alive and well. Leaving that  issue  to  one  side  for  a  moment  (and  also  whether or not I agree with the terminology  describing such an adjudication) recently I had  to  consider  whether  or  not  I  might  have  to  deploy a “Smash and Grab” adjudication for a  client.      A  large  contractor  client,  active  in  the  infrastructure sector, came to me with a bit of  a  payment  related  dilemma.  The  client  had  submitted  a  payment  application  in  accordance  with  its  contract.  The  employer  proceeded  to  issue  a  payment  notice  which  certified  several  million  pounds  in  favour  of  our  client.  Although  the  contractor  client  disagreed  with  the  assessment  on  several  levels,  it  was  quite  prepared  to  take  this  on  the chin and seek to resolve any disagreement  amicably.   The employer then proceeded to issue a pay  less  notice  in  time  in  accordance  with  the  contract.  The  pay  less  notice  took  away  the  vast majority of the payment due. Our client  was obviously dismayed at the sudden change  in  the  employer’s  approach,  not  least  as  nothing  had  changed  on  the  project  as 
  2. 2.   WWW.UKADJUDICATORS.CO.UK  APRIL 2018 NEWSLETTER    2 | P a g e       between the payment notice and the pay less  notice.   The  client  promptly  asked  me  to  challenge  the validity of the pay less notice, such that it  would be ineffective and fall away. In effect, it  would  be  as  if  no  pay  less  notice  had  been  issued. Our client wanted a quick result, which  would not involve scrutinising the valuation of  the account.    At the time I advised the client against taking  such a restrictive approach, as I knew it would  be  risky.  The  pay  less  notice  was  issued  in  time and contained compliant content.    I advised the client to frame the dispute such  that  the  adjudicator  had  jurisdiction  to  examine  the  pay  less  notice,  as  a  matter  of  the grounds of deduction and substance. On a  fundamental  level,  we  attacked  the  pay  less  notice  on  the  basis  that  there  was  not  one  shred  of  evidence  in  support  any  of  the  deductions from the account.    The adjudicator found that the pay less notice  was  contractually‐compliant  and  was  valid,  although we led with the argument that it was  not  effective.  Had  that  been  our  sole  argument,  unfortunately  we  would  have  lost  at  that  stage  and  we  would  have  not  recovered  anything.  Thankfully  we  had  gone  further with our case.      When he examined the content of the notice  (together with the employer’s submissions in  the  adjudication  as  to  why  it  should  be  upheld)  the  adjudicator  agreed  with  our  contractor  client.  There  was  no  evidence  whatsoever  in  support  of  the  deductions.  Although it was effective, essentially the pay  less notice failed as a matter of substance. As  we had asked the adjudicator to enforce the  valuation  of  the  payment  notice,  our  client  was  awarded  the  several  million  pounds  which  had  previously  been  certified,  plus  a  considerable  amount  of  interest  on  top.  The  arguments were less involved than a valuation  adjudication  and,  as  such,  the  decision  was  reached swiftly and efficiently. Cash flow was  maintained and the parties went on to discuss  resolution of the wider disputes.    So,  when  you  are  considering  your  next  “Smash  and  Grab”  as  a  payee,  perhaps  you  should  dig  a  little  bit  deeper  in  framing  the  dispute  and  your  submissions?  It  could  ultimately pay dividends.      Mike  Waring  is  a  dual  qualified  engineer‐ lawyer,  adjudicator  and  partner,  specialising  in  construction  disputes  at  Knights  1759  in  Cheltenham.   mike.waring@knights1759.co.uk   
  3. 3.   WWW.UKADJUDICATORS.CO.UK  APRIL 2018 NEWSLETTER    3 | P a g e       MAYLAYSIAN  CONSTRUCTION  ADJUDICATION  The  Construction  Industry  Payment  and  Adjudication  Regulations  2014  and  the  Construction  Industry  Payment  and  Adjudication  (Exemption)  Order  2014  were  both  implemented  on  15th  April  2014  to  complement CIPAA. CIPAA proceedings are a  summary  procedure  intended  to  reduce  payment  defaults  by  establishing  a  cheaper  and speedier system of dispute resolution for  construction  contracts  in  respect  of  work  done and services rendered, providing for the  recovery  of  payment  upon  the  conclusion  of  the adjudication process in addition to a host  of other remedies such as the right to reduce  the rate of work progress or to suspend work  or  the  securing  of  direct  payment  from  the  principal.  Anyone  entering  into  a  written  construction  contract  in  Malaysia    now  has  the    right  to  a  statutory  payment  procedure  and  an  adjudication  process  for  resolving  disputes.   The  Act  includes  contracts  entered  into  for  consultancy  agreements,  and  the  case  of  Martego Sdn Bhd v Arkitek Meor & Chew Sdn  Bhd  &  Another  Case  [  2017]  1  CLJ  101  confirms  that  the  CIPAA  applies  to  consultancy  contracts  which  provide  purely  consultancy  services.  Contracts  for  buildings  of less than four storeys that are intended for  occupation  by  a  “natural  person”  are  exempted,  this  exemption  being  very  similar  to  the  householder  exemption  found  in  the  UK Construction Act.    The CIPAA includes oil and gas work, the case  of  MIR Valve Sdn Bhd v TH Heavy Engineering  Berhad  [2017]  AMEJ  0538  decided  that  the  Claimant's claim in the Adjudication involving  the Provision to Supply Complete Package of  Actuated  Shutdown  Valve  ("the  valves")  for  the  Layang  FPSO  Project  ("the  Project")  was  one  falling  within  CIPAA.  It  can  be  seen  that  the express wording of the CIPAA is a far more  inclusive of activities than the UK Construction  Act.  Only  disputes  relating  to  payment  for  work  done and services rendered under the express  terms  of  a  construction  contract  may  be  referred  to  adjudication  under  CIPAA.  However,  the  parties  may  agree  after  the  appointment of the adjudicator to extend the  jurisdiction  of  the  adjudicator  to  decide  on  any  other  matter  arising  from  the  construction contract.  For  the  purposes  of  administration  of  adjudication  cases  by  the  AIAC  under  CIPAA,  including  the  appointment  of  an  adjudicator  under CIPAA, the AIAC takes the position that  CIPAA  applies  to  a  payment  dispute  which  arose  under  a  construction  contract  on  or  after  15.4.2014,  regardless  of  whether  the 
  4. 4.   WWW.UKADJUDICATORS.CO.UK  APRIL 2018 NEWSLETTER    4 | P a g e       relevant  construction  contract  was  made  before  or  after  15.4.2014.  In  this  regard,  a  payment  dispute  under  a  construction  contract is said to have arisen when the non‐ paying  party  has,  in  breach  of  the  contract,  failed  to  make  payment  by  the  contractual  due date for payment.  The  CIPAA  applies  to  every  ‘construction  contract’  made  in  writing  relating  to  construction work carried out wholly or partly  in Malaysia, including a construction contract  entered into by the Government. It applies to  both  local  and  international  contracts,  provided  the  subject  construction  work  is  carried out wholly or party in Malaysia..  The CIPAA only applies to contracts which are  made “in writing”. However, no definition or  elaboration  is  provided  in  CIPAA  as  to  what  constitutes  construction  contract  made  in  writing.  AIAC  considers  that  a  construction  contract must be wholly in writing, and that it  is  made  in  writing:‐  – if the contract is made in writing (whether  or  not  it  is  signed  by  the  parties);  –  if  the  contract  is  made  by  exchange  of  communications  in  writing;  or  – if the contract is evidenced in writing.    Where parties agree otherwise than in writing  by  reference  to  terms  which  are  in  writing,  they make a contract in writing. A contract is  evidenced  in  writing  if  a  contract  made  otherwise than in writing is recorded by one  of  the  parties,  or  by  a  third  party,  with  the  authority of the parties to the contract.    The Act applies equally to the Government of  Malaysia  as  well  as  the  Private  Sector.  However,  pursuant  to  the  Construction  Industry  Payment  and  Adjudication  (Exemption)  Order  2014,  two  categories  of  Government  construction  contracts  are  exempted.  The  first  category  of  Government  construction  contracts  are  contained  in  the  First Schedule of the Exemption order namely  a  contract  for  any  construction  works  that  involve emergency, unforeseen circumstances  and that relate to national security or security  related  facilities.  The  second  category  of  Government  construction  contracts  are  contained  in  the  Second  Schedule  of  the  Exemption  order  namely  construction  contracts  with  the  Government  of  the  contract  sum  of  twenty  million  ringgit  (RM20,000,000)  and  below.  With  regards  to  this  second  category,  the  exemption  order  merely  exempts  these  contracts  from  the  application of subsections 6(3), 7(2), 10(1), 10  (2), 11(1) and 11(2) of CIPAA 2012, and relates  to the timeline for submissions and replaced  with  a  set  of  longer  timelines  for  such  submissions. It is also a temporary exemption  from 15 April 2014 to 31 December 2015 for  this  second  category.  However,  the 
  5. 5.   WWW.UKADJUDICATORS.CO.UK  APRIL 2018 NEWSLETTER    5 | P a g e       exemption  order  does  not  extend  to  construction  contracts  to  which  the  Government is not a party.  The process starting from the dispute until the  adjudication decision is as follows:  Claim  of  Payment  –  Sec.  5,  CIPAA  –  to  be  served by the unpaid party on the non‐paying  party  Payment  Response  –  Sec.  6,  CIPAA  –  to  be  served by the non‐paying party to the unpaid  party  (within  10  working  days).  A  party  who  admits  to  the  claim  shall  state  the  whole  amount  claimed  or  any  amount  as  admitted  while one who disputes the claim shall state  the amount  disputed and the reason for the  dispute.  Adjudication Notice – Sec. 7 & 8, CIPAA – to  be  served  together  with  any  supporting  document by the claimant on the respondent  (within 5 working days)  Appointment of Adjudicator: – Sec. 21 & 23,  CIPAA – may be by agreement of the parties  in  dispute  (within  10  working  days  from  the  service of the notice of adjudication) or by the  Director of the AIAC upon the request of both  parties or by either party in dispute if there is  no  agreement  by  both  parties  in  the  appointment (within 5 working days upon the  receipt of a request)    Terms of appointment – Sec. 22 &23, CIPAA –  to  be  negotiated  and  agreed  with  the  adjudicator  (within  10  working  days,  after  which the parties or the Director of the AIAC  may proceed to appoint a new adjudicator)  Adjudication  Claim  –  Sec.  9,  CIPAA  –  to  be  served  together  with  any  supporting  documents by the claimant on the respondent  and the adjudicator (within 10 working days)  Adjudication Response – Sec. 10, CIPAA – to  be  served  together  with  any  supporting  documents by the respondent on the claimant  and the adjudicator (within 10 working days).  Adjudication  Reply  –  Sec.  11,  CIPAA  –  to  be  served with any supporting documents by the  claimant  on  the  respondent  and  the  adjudicator (within 5 working days)  Representation – Sec. 8, CIPAA – parties may  be self‐represented or be represented by any  party appointed by them, including solicitors  Adjudication proceedings – Sec. 25, CIPAA –  to be conducted according to the directions of  the adjudicator, which may or may not involve  oral evidence  Decision  –  Sec.  12,  CIPAA  –  to  be  delivered  within  45  working  days  from  the  service  of  adjudication  response  or  reply,  whichever  later;  or  if  no  adjudication  response  is  received, 45 working days from the expiry of  the  prescribed  period  for  the  adjudication 
  6. 6.   WWW.UKADJUDICATORS.CO.UK  APRIL 2018 NEWSLETTER    6 | P a g e       response; or such further time as agreed to by  the parties.  The adjudication proceeding is binding unless  it is set aside by the High Court, the matter is  settled by both parties in writing, the dispute  is  finally  decided  by  arbitration  or  the  court,  or  there  is  a  stay  of  adjudication  decision  pursuant to Sec. 13 and 16, CIPAA. If either or  both  parties  do  not  agree  with  the  adjudication  decision,  the  case  can  be  reopened  by  arbitration  or  litigation  at  the  conclusion or termination of the construction  contract.  According  to  Section  3(1)  of  the  Arbitration  (Amendment)  Act  2018  [Act  A1563]  and  the  Ministers’ appointment of the date of coming  into  operation,  gazetted  on  27th   February  2018,  the  name  of  Kuala  Lumpur  Regional  Centre  for  Arbitration  (the  “KLRCA”)  was  changed to the Asian International Arbitration  Centre  (Malaysia)  (the  “AIAC”)  starting  from  28th  February  2018.  Any  reference  to  the  KLRCA in Construction Industry Payment and  Adjudication  Act  2012  published  by  the  KLRCA,  in  any  written  law  or  in  any  instrument,  deed,  title,  document,  bond,  agreement  or  working  arrangement  shall,  after the 28th February 2018, be construed as  a  reference  to  the  AIAC.  All  approvals,  directions,  notices,  guidelines,  circulars,  guidance  notes,  practice  notes,  rulings,  decision, notifications, exemptions and other  executive  acts,  howsoever  called,  given  or  made  by  the  KLRCA  before  28th  February  2018,  shall  continue  to  remain  in  full  force  and  effect,  until  amended,  replaced,  rescinded or revoked.  The Maylasian drafters took into account the  UK and Australian schemes and opted to limit  the  type  of  dispute  that  may  be  referred  following  the  Australian  model  rather  than  the  UK  model  which  allows  to  refer  any  dispute arising under the contract.  It  has  been  successful  with  thousands  of  referrals  being  made  with  most  decisions  being upheld.  Thomas  Johnson,  is  a  director  in  the  global  construction  claims  consultancy  Hanscomb  Intercontinental.    WHAT  DISPUTE  CAN  BE  REFERRED  TO ADJUDICATION IN THE UK  The LDEDCA applies to contracts entered into  on or after 1 October 2011 and requires that a  party to a construction contract has the right  to  refer  a  dispute  arising  under  the  contract  for  adjudication  as  per  section  108  of  the  1996 Act.     
  7. 7.   WWW.UKADJUDICATORS.CO.UK  APRIL 2018 NEWSLETTER    7 | P a g e       Since  the  dispute  must  arise  ‘under  the  contract’, you cannot seek adjudication upon  matters arising before the contract came into  existence or in the course of negotiating the  contract  for  example  a  claim  for  misrepresentation or upon matters that arise  outside of the contract or example a claim for   nuisance.  Other  than  these  limits  any  dispute  can  be  referred to adjudication. This is in contrast to  a  lot  of  the  commonwealth  construction  adjudication statutory schemes where only a  dispute  about  payment  may  be  referred  to  adjudication.  The case of Banner Holdings Ltd v Colchester  Borough  Council  [2010]  EWHC  139  (TCC)  confirms  that  the  contract  cannot  prevent  a  dispute  about  the  validity  of  a  contractual  determination  from  being  referred  to  adjudication.  Whilst  the  contract  may  widen  the  matters  that  could  referred  to  adjudication it cannot limit them to less than  the minimum required by the LDEDCA.  The  Irish  Construction  Contracts  Act  2013  limits  the  scope  of  the  adjudication  to  ‘payment  disputes’.    Payment  disputes  have  not been explicitly defined in the Act and it is  likely  to  require  Court  decisions  before  this  term is adequately defined and understood by  adjudication advisers in Ireland.    The  various  studies  and  research  by  Janey  Milligan and Lisa Cattanach point to the main  issues being referred in the UK as Valuation of  Final Account, Failure to comply with payment  provisions,  Valuation  of  interim  payments,  Withholding  monies,  Extension  of  time,  Loss  and  expense,  Valuation  of  variations,  Defective work , Determination, Non‐payment  of fees which arguably could possibly all touch  upon a payment dispute if the Irish model was  applied.  It  is  submitted  that  the  UK  model  is  sufficiently  widely  worded  to  allow  all  common  disputes  to  be  determined  whilst  those of some of the other countries are not  and  will  prevent  users  being  able  to  refer  disputes to adjudication.    ESCL CONFERENCE 2018  The European Society of Construction Law  conference 2018 is due to take place from  Thursday, 25 October 2018 to Saturday, 27  October 2018 in Bucharest.  http://rscl.ro/en/escl‐2018/        
  8. 8.   WWW.UKADJUDICATORS.CO.UK  APRIL 2018 NEWSLETTER    8 | P a g e       SCL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE  2018    The  Society  of  Construction  Law  8th    International Conference is being held at the  Palmer  House  Hotel  Chicago  from  the  26th‐ 28th September 2018.  https://www.scl‐ na.org/system/files/SCL_Program_Final.pdf    https://www.scl‐na.org/conference‐ registration           ESCL SUMMER SCHOOL   Comparative  European  construction  and  procurement  law  course  is  being  held  from  the 2‐7 July 2018 at KIVI, Prinsessegracht 23,  The Hague, the Netherlands.    ADJUDICATION SOCIETY ANNUAL  CONFERENCE 2018  The Society's Seventeenth Annual Conference  will be held at the Mercure Bristol Hotel on  Thursday 8th November 2018.  FIDIC CONFERENCES 2018   The FIDIC Asia Pacific contract users'  conference takes place in July 2018, the Latin  America contract users' conference takes  place in September 2018 and the Africa  contract users' conference is taking place at  Livingstone, Zambia in October 2018.     The FIDIC International Infrastructure  Conference takes place in Berlin from the  9‐ 11 September 2018 at the Intercontinental  Hotel Berlin.       
  9. 9.   WWW.UKADJUDICATORS.CO.UK  APRIL 2018 NEWSLETTER    9 | P a g e       DRBF CONFERENCES 2018  Mexica City, Mexico 25‐26 April 2018  Tokyo, Japan 23‐25 May 2018  Bangkok, Thailand 28‐29 May 2018  Charlotte,  USA 17‐19 October 2017  Geneva, Switzerland 14‐16 November 2018  SCL (SINGAPORE) ANNUAL  CONFERENCE    This year's SCL (Singapore) Annual  Conference is being held at Fort Canning Hotel  on the 12th  September 2018.   UK ADJUDICATORS DINNER   The UK Adjudicators will be holding a dinner  at Loch Fyne restaurant in Bristol the evening  of the 7th  November 2018 7.00pm for 7.30pm.  Anyone with an interest in adjudication is  welcome to attend. Further details will follow  in due course.  11TH  INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE  ON CONSTRUCTION LAW AND  ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE  RESOLUTION    The  11th  International  Conference  on  Construction  Law  and  Alternative  Dispute  Resolution  hosted  by Kailash Dabeesingh  Arbitration  Chambers  in  association  with  Society of Construction Law is taking place in  Mauritius from Wednesday 23 to Thursday 24  May 2018 at the  Sofitel Imperial Hotel, Flic‐ en‐Flac, Mauritius.  Speakers at the 11th International Conference  on Construction Law and  Alternative Dispute  Resolution event include:   Kailash Dabeesingh   Sir Rupert Jackson   Peter Collie   Martin Green   Prof. Sundra Rajoo   Christopher Ennis 
  10. 10.   WWW.UKADJUDICATORS.CO.UK  APRIL 2018 NEWSLETTER    10 | P a g e        Abdul Jinadu   Johan Beyers   Nigel Grout  https://mailchi.mp/f440dceebb8c/11th‐ international‐conference‐on‐construction‐ law‐and‐alternative‐dispute‐ resolution?e=bdd8b6183f   
  • DeanSayers

    Apr. 25, 2018
  • SeanGibbsDipArbFCIAR

    Apr. 22, 2018

UK Adjudicators April 2018 newsletter

Views

Total views

305

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

0

Actions

Downloads

3

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

2

×