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The Budget Outlook for 2015 to 2025 in 18 Slides
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The Budget Outlook for 2015 to 2025 in 18 Slides Slide 1 The Budget Outlook for 2015 to 2025 in 18 Slides Slide 2 The Budget Outlook for 2015 to 2025 in 18 Slides Slide 3 The Budget Outlook for 2015 to 2025 in 18 Slides Slide 4 The Budget Outlook for 2015 to 2025 in 18 Slides Slide 5 The Budget Outlook for 2015 to 2025 in 18 Slides Slide 6 The Budget Outlook for 2015 to 2025 in 18 Slides Slide 7 The Budget Outlook for 2015 to 2025 in 18 Slides Slide 8 The Budget Outlook for 2015 to 2025 in 18 Slides Slide 9 The Budget Outlook for 2015 to 2025 in 18 Slides Slide 10 The Budget Outlook for 2015 to 2025 in 18 Slides Slide 11 The Budget Outlook for 2015 to 2025 in 18 Slides Slide 12 The Budget Outlook for 2015 to 2025 in 18 Slides Slide 13 The Budget Outlook for 2015 to 2025 in 18 Slides Slide 14 The Budget Outlook for 2015 to 2025 in 18 Slides Slide 15 The Budget Outlook for 2015 to 2025 in 18 Slides Slide 16 The Budget Outlook for 2015 to 2025 in 18 Slides Slide 17 The Budget Outlook for 2015 to 2025 in 18 Slides Slide 18 The Budget Outlook for 2015 to 2025 in 18 Slides Slide 19 The Budget Outlook for 2015 to 2025 in 18 Slides Slide 20
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Presentation by Keith Hall, CBO Director, to the American Business Conference.

The federal budget deficit in fiscal year 2015 equaled 2.5 percent of GDP, the smallest deficit since 2007. But, over the next 10 years, federal spending is projected to rise relative to the size of the economy because of the growth in health care and retirement programs and escalating interest costs. If federal tax and spending policies remained generally unchanged, revenues would not keep pace with spending, and within a few years, the deficit would begin to rise again relative to GDP.

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Presentation by Keith Hall, CBO Director, to the American Business Conference. The federal budget deficit in fiscal year 2015 equaled 2.5 percent of GDP, the smallest deficit since 2007. But, over the next 10 years, federal spending is projected to rise relative to the size of the economy because of the growth in health care and retirement programs and escalating interest costs. If federal tax and spending policies remained generally unchanged, revenues would not keep pace with spending, and within a few years, the deficit would begin to rise again relative to GDP.

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