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OPENNESS                                                                   IN THE

     ERA OF THE

     SOCIAL WEB
     C...
@chrismessina
                                #owv09




also, if you want to give me a shout out on Twitter, I’m @chrisme...
“The Javascript Trap”




“You may be running non-free programs on your computer every day without realizing it —
through ...
“The Javascript Trap”
                           “You may be running non-free programs on
                           your ...
“The Javascript Trap”
                           “Many sites still use JavaScript that way, but
                          ...
“The Javascript Trap”
                           “Many sites still use JavaScript that way, but
                          ...
“The Javascript Trap”
                           “The source code of a program is the preferred
                          ...
“The Javascript Trap”
                           “The source code of a program is the preferred
                          ...
“The Javascript Trap”
                           “Silently loading and running non-free
                           program...
“The Javascript Trap”
                           “Silently loading and running non-free
                           program...
gone is the time when open source software ALONE is enough to have freedom.

richard stallman has been a staunch advocate ...
37Signal’s Basecamp

But this ignores the fundamental design advantage of cloud computing — which is that
you’re basically...
What does open mean?




which is forcing us, I believe, to reconceive of what “openness” means.
Let’s begin with Web 2.0
“Web 2.0 is the network as platform, spanning all
           connected devices; Web 2.0 applications are those that
      ...
“Web 2.0 is the business revolution in the computer industry
           caused by the move to the internet as platform, an...
Five rules
        The perpetual beta becomes a process for engaging
        customers.

        Share and share-alike dat...
now, some people want to suggest that Web 3.0 is coming. it’s like the modern version of the
apocalypse: everyone wants to...
“So what’s the seminal development that’s ushering in the era of
        Web 3.0? It’s the real arrival, after years of fa...
Bullshit.




writing that the real arrival, after years of false predictions, of the thin client, running
clean, simple s...
“After all, Web 2.0 was not a new version of the web, but a
           name that tried to capture what distinguished the c...
Open source?




and so if we consider the last 10 years of open source, it’s really been about a slow, grudging
migration...
most people know of open source because of the public battle between mozilla’s firefox and
internet explorer.

sure, maybe ...
Yoism: the world’s first open source religion


but there has also been something of a religious fervor in the open source...
and it’s been taking to some hilarious extremes.

Still, this is what I might call “institutional drift”, which is what ha...
and so when we see things like this, where camel is using the open brand to advertise their
cigarettes, we must call them ...
and so when we see things like this, where camel is using the open brand to advertise their
cigarettes, we must call them ...
if we go back to the original premise of Stallman’s call for software freedom, it was about a
basic LIBERTARIAN idea: to n...
“The price of freedom is eternal vigilance.”
                                                                  —thomas jef...
our^
           “The price of freedom is eternal vigilance.”
                                                             ...
but this is a problematic approach in the era of social computing, when you must
INHERENTLY rely on someone else to get th...
What does open mean?




but this is a problematic approach in the era of social computing, when you must
INHERENTLY rely ...
Competition &
                    freedom of choice




for me, openness is about competition and freedom of choice
Social networks & monopolies

             data portability                   lowering switching costs
             multi-...
Photo by Mary Beth Griffo Rigby
phone number portability — concept of being able to switch providers without incurring a
s...
Photo by Mary Beth Griffo Rigby
phone number portability — concept of being able to switch providers without incurring a
s...
multi-homing... parallelizing our networks to improve robustness.

this is a service called ping.fm — it lets you publish ...
here’s an example of roaming.

at&t sent me a text message telling me that they wanted to charge me $20 a megabyte to
acce...
Picnik
disaggregation: the ability to choose the service that I want to use without having to import
EVERYTHING AND withou...
Cloud computing




what does open mean in the era of cloud computing? (CLICK)
c:




                                                                       icon by Seedling Design
we’re going from own...
http://




                                                                          icon by Seedling Design
to relying o...
http://




                                                                icons by Seedling Design and Fast Icon
you’ve ...
http://




                                                                              icons by Seedling Design, etc
hy...
factoryjoe.com




                 icons by Seedling Design
and we’re even seeing this creep into desktop applications like Keynote where there is now a
Share menu... that I imagine ...
and we’re even seeing this creep into desktop applications like Keynote where there is now a
Share menu... that I imagine ...
Social web




which brings us to the social web.

it’s one thing if you want to move your application from one company’s ...
WWW


the reality is, the web was built for sharing documents... (CLICK)
WWW


                                                                  icons by iconaholic.com
not for connecting people ...
?                ?              ?
                           ?         WWW                     ?
                         ...
I think we can start to see where this is going — in a very basic way — by studying
FriendFeed. Already they’re doing a lo...
But they’re ending up spending all kinds of resources just getting the basics working, since
our feed formats like ATOM an...
Diso
this is really the premise behind the Diso Project:

to make it make it easier to build social experiences on the web...
Diso
                              Diso Project • http://diso-project.org




this is really the premise behind the Diso P...
Diso   Components*




                                                  *subject to change
(DON’T CLICK)

identity & profi...
Diso    Components*



             1. identity & profile
             2. discovery & access control
             3. conta...
Ubiquity of standards move an
         industry to compete at a new level




                                            ...
...leading to opportunities to
                  innovate user experience




                                            ...
so for example, with the spread of javascript-enabled browsers, we’re now seeing a
venerable old project like Drupal be ab...
Identity




but all of this is predicated on developing a means for estabishing durable, cross-site identity
on the web.
the individual is basic atomic unity of society.
You can’t have “social”
                      without “society”




we’re really talking about society — the collection of...
and since change happens at the level of the individual

a building block technology like openid is critical.

the archite...
Real identity




it’s interesting to look at a current trend

people are starting to use their real identity online.
Facebook recommendations
No where is this more obvious than on Facebook.

Here is a list of three people that Facebook has...
So let’s say I actually dive in and ask Facebook to list ALL the people it thinks I might know...
this is where it gets in...
So let’s say I actually dive in and ask Facebook to list ALL the people it thinks I might know...
this is where it gets in...
so I decide to do a search — and lo, out of 444 results, he comes up first. Sure, but this is the
same guy from the previou...
so I decide to do a search — and lo, out of 444 results, he comes up first. Sure, but this is the
same guy from the previou...
Ok, now I’m feeling pretty confident. In lieu of a shared secret between us, a familiar social
graph is a reasonable substi...
your social graph is essentially a kind of identity fingerprint for people who know you and
know who you know.

but this is...
@factoryjoe




so some of you might know that I use “factoryjoe” as my username on the web.

But, no one in the real worl...
@factoryjoe
                        @chrismessina




So I killed it. At least on Twitter. And now I’m just @chrismessina....
Let’s take a look at another example.

Compare the chat list on the left with the one on the right.

With AIM, you’ve got ...
Let’s take a look at another example.

Compare the chat list on the left with the one on the right.

With AIM, you’ve got ...
“l0ckergn0me”
                                             vs.


                             Chris Pirillo



understand ...
Eventbox
and you can see this in software like eventbox
Eventbox
why does this option even exist?

This to me proves that we are in a transitional period, from assumed aliases to...
Eventbox
why does this option even exist?

This to me proves that we are in a transitional period, from assumed aliases to...
even places like MySpace, where pseudonymity reigns is moving in this direction...
even places like MySpace, where pseudonymity reigns is moving in this direction...
morality,
                                                     creativity,
                                               ...
• facebook.com/chrismessina

           • friendfeed.com/chrismessina

           • google.com/profiles/chrismessina

     ...
• facebook.com/chrismessina

          • friendfeed.com/chrismessina

          • google.com/profiles/chrismessina

       ...
why do you think Facebook is getting into the username business after resisting so long?
Five rules
        The perpetual beta becomes a process for engaging
        customers.

        Share and share-alike dat...
Five rules
        The perpetual beta becomes a process for engaging
        customers.

        Share and share-alike dat...
this is how facebook presents me to the world.

i can’t change this. I can’t pick which friends show up here.

i can chang...
friendfeed presents an activity-centric view of me.

i can’t change how this looks, but at least it represents parts of wh...
Google now lets me have quite a bit of control over my profile, but it makes me look like a
google employee.

oh, and every...
Meanwhile, Twitter is all about what I’m doing, but I can really only customize the colors and
background image... but oth...
So what if I wanted to just do something like this? I’m not saying this is the best webpage
evar, but the point is, when I...
and so this is why i use factoryjoe.com as my OpenID. It means that I, as an individual, am in
charge of, and own my own i...
*
now, do you know what this is?

it’s the asshole of the universe.
* Connect




and like assholes, it seems that everyone wants to have a connect API these days.
Photo by Timothy Vogel
the result is what we call the “OpenID NASCAR” where everyone wants their brand shown on
login form...
...like this.
when people really just want this.

their goal is to get access to their account

To be fair, this is merely an uncomforta...
Eventually, I think people will know their OpenID, just like their address, phone number,
screennames, email, and so on......
• What’s your address?




Eventually, I think people will know their OpenID, just like their address, phone number,
scree...
• What’s your address?

           • What’s your phone number?




Eventually, I think people will know their OpenID, just...
• What’s your address?

           • What’s your phone number?

           • What’s your AOL screenname?




Eventually, I...
• What’s your address?

           • What’s your phone number?

           • What’s your AOL screenname?

           • Wha...
• What’s your address?

           • What’s your phone number?

           • What’s your AOL screenname?

           • Wha...
• What’s your address?

           • What’s your phone number?

           • What’s your AOL screenname?

           • Wha...
• What’s your address?

           • What’s your phone number?

           • What’s your AOL screenname?

           • Wha...
• What’s your address?

           • What’s your phone number?

           • What’s your AOL screenname?

           • Wha...
Why standards?
The open, social web will be built on standards that are free
to implement and that encourage competition at the layer of
...
so, one example of this is email standards like SMTP and IMAP. These protocols are
dinosaurs... (CLICK)
but have allowed services like Gmail to be started relatively recently and widespread adoption
by creating the incentive t...
where they’ve created this amazing experience in the iphone version of Gmail. Largely
because of standards.
similarly, Twitter has grown in large part because of its use of SMS, a standard feature of
phones that has been around fo...


of course, one of the best examples of my point is Apple.
and indeed, one of the best examples of the power of standards to change an industry is the
iphone.

it is the benefactor ...
IEEE 802.11 (WiFi)
    International Mobile Telecommunications-2000 (IMT-2000)                        vCalendar



       ...
Furthermore, WebKit is the rendering engine that powers the Safari browser.

this is an open source project
Furthermore, WebKit is the rendering engine that powers the Safari browser.

this is an open source project
webkit is also the rendering engine that powers Google’s Chromium/Chrome open source
browser project.
webkit is also the rendering engine that powers Google’s Chromium/Chrome open source
browser project.
the Palm Pre’s applications are also all webkit apps.

see how important standards are here?
So, just as WebKit is becoming the new operating level,

the underpinings of Mac OS X itself is UNIX, which is open source...
So, just as WebKit is becoming the new operating level,

the underpinings of Mac OS X itself is UNIX, which is open source...
Vancouver, BC


and I think we’re starting to see our civic institutions start to raise up to meet these
challenges.

for ...
a city that thinks like the web.




working on building “a city that thinks like the web”...

using open data, open stand...
Open Data, Open Standards, Open Source




working on building “a city that thinks like the web”...

using open data, open...
The open, social web




is to the open social web, where more standards, more data, and more open source will
provide us ...
BECAUSE

Our fundamental challenge is to build technologies that enhance the network and serve
people so that they in turn...
Our challenge is to build technologies that enhance the
        network and serve people so that they in turn can build
  ...
fin.


          chris@citizenagency.com • @chrismessina • factoryjoe.com
          Color palette: oddend by martin        ...
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Openness In The Era Of Social Web

  1. 1. OPENNESS IN THE ERA OF THE SOCIAL WEB Chris Messina • Open Web Vancouver • June 12, 2009 • Vancouver, Canada Iʼm here to talk to you about Openness in the Era of the Social Web. Before I begin, I want to point out this is not a technical talk, but is somewhat more abstract. My goal is to get you to thinking about “openness” and to consider how it applies to your work today.
  2. 2. @chrismessina #owv09 also, if you want to give me a shout out on Twitter, I’m @chrismessina. Today’s hashtag is #owv09
  3. 3. “The Javascript Trap” “You may be running non-free programs on your computer every day without realizing it — through your web browser. “JavaScript ... was once used for minor frills in web pages, such as cute but inessential navigation and display features. It was acceptable to consider these as mere extensions of HTML markup, rather than as true software; they did not constitute a significant issue.
  4. 4. “The Javascript Trap” “You may be running non-free programs on your computer every day without realizing it — through your web browser. “JavaScript ... was once used for minor frills in web pages, such as cute but inessential navigation and display features. It was acceptable to consider these as mere extensions of HTML markup, rather than as true software; they did not constitute a significant issue. ... “You may be running non-free programs on your computer every day without realizing it — through your web browser. “JavaScript ... was once used for minor frills in web pages, such as cute but inessential navigation and display features. It was acceptable to consider these as mere extensions of HTML markup, rather than as true software; they did not constitute a significant issue.
  5. 5. “The Javascript Trap” “Many sites still use JavaScript that way, but some use it for major programs that do large jobs. “Many sites still use JavaScript that way, but some use it for major programs that do large jobs. “For instance, Google Docs downloads into your machine a JavaScript program which measures half a megabyte, in a compacted form that we could call Obfuscript because it has no comments and hardly any whitespace, and the method names are one letter long.
  6. 6. “The Javascript Trap” “Many sites still use JavaScript that way, but some use it for major programs that do large jobs. “For instance, Google Docs downloads into your machine a JavaScript program which measures half a megabyte, in a compacted form that we could call Obfuscript because it has no comments and hardly any whitespace, and the method names are one letter long. ... “Many sites still use JavaScript that way, but some use it for major programs that do large jobs. “For instance, Google Docs downloads into your machine a JavaScript program which measures half a megabyte, in a compacted form that we could call Obfuscript because it has no comments and hardly any whitespace, and the method names are one letter long.
  7. 7. “The Javascript Trap” “The source code of a program is the preferred form for modifying it; the compacted code is not source code, and the real source code of this program is not available to the user. “The source code of a program is the preferred form for modifying it; the compacted code is not source code, and the real source code of this program is not available to the user. “It is possible to release a JavaScript program as free software, by distributing the source code under a free software license. But even if the program's source is available, there is no easy way to run your modified version instead of the original....
  8. 8. “The Javascript Trap” “The source code of a program is the preferred form for modifying it; the compacted code is not source code, and the real source code of this program is not available to the user. “It is possible to release a JavaScript program as free software, by distributing the source code under a free software license. But even if the program's source is available, there is no easy way to run your modified version instead of the original. ... “The source code of a program is the preferred form for modifying it; the compacted code is not source code, and the real source code of this program is not available to the user. “It is possible to release a JavaScript program as free software, by distributing the source code under a free software license. But even if the program's source is available, there is no easy way to run your modified version instead of the original....
  9. 9. “The Javascript Trap” “Silently loading and running non-free programs is one among several issues raised by “web applications”. The term “web application” was designed to disregard the fundamental distinction between software delivered to users and software running on the server. “Silently loading and running non-free programs is one among several issues raised by “web applications”. The term “web application” was designed to disregard the fundamental distinction between software delivered to users and software running on the server. “In practical terms, how can we deal with the problem of non-free JavaScript programs in web sites?” So on the one hand, we have this problem with “web applications” where our freedoms, according to Richard Stallman, are in jeopardy.
  10. 10. “The Javascript Trap” “Silently loading and running non-free programs is one among several issues raised by “web applications”. The term “web application” was designed to disregard the fundamental distinction between software delivered to users and software running on the server. “In practical terms, how can we deal with the problem of non-free JavaScript programs in web sites?” — Richard Stallman, The Javascript Trap “Silently loading and running non-free programs is one among several issues raised by “web applications”. The term “web application” was designed to disregard the fundamental distinction between software delivered to users and software running on the server. “In practical terms, how can we deal with the problem of non-free JavaScript programs in web sites?” So on the one hand, we have this problem with “web applications” where our freedoms, according to Richard Stallman, are in jeopardy.
  11. 11. gone is the time when open source software ALONE is enough to have freedom. richard stallman has been a staunch advocate of open source, but as you can intuit from his comments about javascript, in the era of the social web, we need a new narrative for “open”...
  12. 12. 37Signal’s Basecamp But this ignores the fundamental design advantage of cloud computing — which is that you’re basically relying on someone else to do the hard stuff of improving software and dealing with servers and all that stuff. More importantly, software today is becoming more and more social — so big deal if you can get your data out (as you can here with Basecamp) if it means that you lose the metadata and can no longer collaborate? We’re moving beyond the era where source code was the primary mechanism of lock-in to one where identity, metadata and facilitating sharing are the things that we should be most concerned with.
  13. 13. What does open mean? which is forcing us, I believe, to reconceive of what “openness” means.
  14. 14. Let’s begin with Web 2.0
  15. 15. “Web 2.0 is the network as platform, spanning all connected devices; Web 2.0 applications are those that make the most of the intrinsic advantages of that platform: delivering software as a continually-updated service that gets better the more people use it, consuming and remixing data from multiple sources, including individual users, while providing their own data and services in a form that allows remixing by others, creating network effects through an “architecture of participation,” and going beyond the page metaphor of Web 1.0 to deliver rich user experiences.” — Tim O’Reilly, Web 2.0: Compact Definition? Photo credit: Adam Tinworth “Web 2.0 is the network as platform, spanning all connected devices; Web 2.0 applications are those that make the most of the intrinsic advantages of that platform: delivering software as a continually-updated service that gets better the more people use it, consuming and remixing data from multiple sources, including individual users, while providing their own data and services in a form that allows remixing by others, creating network effects through an “architecture of participation,” and going beyond the page metaphor of Web 1.0 to deliver rich user experiences.”
  16. 16. “Web 2.0 is the business revolution in the computer industry caused by the move to the internet as platform, and an attempt to understand the rules for success on that new platform. Chief among those rules is this: Build applications that harness network effects to get better the more people use them. (This is what I’ve elsewhere called ‘harnessing collective intelligence.’)” — Tim O’Reilly Photo credit: Adam Tinworth Web 2.0 is the business revolution in the computer industry caused by the move to the internet as platform, and an attempt to understand the rules for success on that new platform. Chief among those rules is this: Build applications that harness network effects to get better the more people use them. (This is what I’ve elsewhere called “harnessing collective intelligence.”)
  17. 17. Five rules The perpetual beta becomes a process for engaging customers. Share and share-alike data, reusing others’ and providing APIs to your own. Ignore the distinction between client and server. On the net, open APIs and standard protocols win. Lock-in comes from data accrual, owning a namespace or non-standard formats. Tim also laid out five rules that accompanied his definition from back in Dec 2006. The perpetual beta becomes a process for engaging customers. Share and share-alike data, reusing others’ and providing APIs to your own. Ignore the distinction between client and server. On the net, open APIs and standard protocols win. Lock-in comes from data accrual, owning a namespace or non-standard formats. and this was all aimed at speaking to open source developers who saw the world through the lense of Linux and hardware — and weren’t yet taking the network as a platform seriously.
  18. 18. now, some people want to suggest that Web 3.0 is coming. it’s like the modern version of the apocalypse: everyone wants to be the first to predict its arrival. about a month ago, Walt Mossberg and Kara Swisher became the latest pundits to suggest that, no, really, Web 3.0 is upon us (CLICK)
  19. 19. “So what’s the seminal development that’s ushering in the era of Web 3.0? It’s the real arrival, after years of false predictions, of the thin client, running clean, simple software, against cloud-based data and services. The poster children for this Bullshit. new era have been the Apple iPhone and iPod Touch, which have sold 37 million units in less than two years and attracted 35,000 apps and one billion app downloads in just nine months.” — Walt Mossberg and Kara Swisher, Welcome to Web 3.0 writing that the real arrival, after years of false predictions, of the thin client, running clean, simple software, against cloud-based data and services is Web 3.0. And that the iPhone and iPod Touch are its horsemen. (CLICK) Well, I call bullshit.
  20. 20. Bullshit. writing that the real arrival, after years of false predictions, of the thin client, running clean, simple software, against cloud-based data and services is Web 3.0. And that the iPhone and iPod Touch are its horsemen. (CLICK) Well, I call bullshit.
  21. 21. “After all, Web 2.0 was not a new version of the web, but a name that tried to capture what distinguished the companies that survived the dotcom bust from those that survived, and point the way forward for new companies entering the market.” — Tim O’Reilly, responding to Mossberg and Swisher Photo credit: Adam Tinworth Web 2.0 isn’t a version number. Instead, it was a narrative aimed at the industry to explain to them the rise of the age of cloud computing.
  22. 22. Open source? and so if we consider the last 10 years of open source, it’s really been about a slow, grudging migration from a hardware-based perspective to the cloud.
  23. 23. most people know of open source because of the public battle between mozilla’s firefox and internet explorer. sure, maybe some people have heard of linux, but few people actually use it in day-to-day computing.
  24. 24. Yoism: the world’s first open source religion but there has also been something of a religious fervor in the open source community, rejecting all that which is not 100% open and free.
  25. 25. and it’s been taking to some hilarious extremes. Still, this is what I might call “institutional drift”, which is what happens when you lose of track what you’re fighting for.
  26. 26. and so when we see things like this, where camel is using the open brand to advertise their cigarettes, we must call them out. this is not “open” as we think of it. this is an example of what i call “open washing”. it’s the proverbial wolf (mascarading as a desert animal) in sheep’s clothing.
  27. 27. and so when we see things like this, where camel is using the open brand to advertise their cigarettes, we must call them out. this is not “open” as we think of it. this is an example of what i call “open washing”. it’s the proverbial wolf (mascarading as a desert animal) in sheep’s clothing.
  28. 28. if we go back to the original premise of Stallman’s call for software freedom, it was about a basic LIBERTARIAN idea: to not have to rely on anyone else when running your computer.
  29. 29. “The price of freedom is eternal vigilance.” —thomas jefferson this is along the lines of what Jefferson meant when he said that “the price of freedom is eternal vigilance”. he was talking about “OUR” freedom. the freedom of the individual against oligarchic and monopolistic power.
  30. 30. our^ “The price of freedom is eternal vigilance.” —thomas jefferson this is along the lines of what Jefferson meant when he said that “the price of freedom is eternal vigilance”. he was talking about “OUR” freedom. the freedom of the individual against oligarchic and monopolistic power.
  31. 31. but this is a problematic approach in the era of social computing, when you must INHERENTLY rely on someone else to get the benefits of this revolution. (CLICK) so we must ask ourselves, WHAT DOES OPEN MEAN?
  32. 32. What does open mean? but this is a problematic approach in the era of social computing, when you must INHERENTLY rely on someone else to get the benefits of this revolution. (CLICK) so we must ask ourselves, WHAT DOES OPEN MEAN?
  33. 33. Competition & freedom of choice for me, openness is about competition and freedom of choice
  34. 34. Social networks & monopolies data portability lowering switching costs multi-homing increasing reliability roaming incurring off-network costs disaggregation service substitutability Bertil Hatt in Paris, working on his Ph D in economics... talked to me about social network monopolies. gave some good ways to think about this. data portabilility -> lowering switching costs. multi-homing -> increasing reliability of service by parallelizing access roaming -> the ability to access your service from someone else’s network disaggregation -> the ability to substitute services
  35. 35. Photo by Mary Beth Griffo Rigby phone number portability — concept of being able to switch providers without incurring a switching fee. we don’t have the concept of social network switching. furthermore, when the industry was left to its own means, it didn’t make this possible for free... and so governments had to step in a regulate the industry to ensure this kind of freedom.
  36. 36. Photo by Mary Beth Griffo Rigby phone number portability — concept of being able to switch providers without incurring a switching fee. we don’t have the concept of social network switching. furthermore, when the industry was left to its own means, it didn’t make this possible for free... and so governments had to step in a regulate the industry to ensure this kind of freedom.
  37. 37. multi-homing... parallelizing our networks to improve robustness. this is a service called ping.fm — it lets you publish to many networks all at once making sure that people have access to your data. it might not be ideal, but it’s a good example of parallelizing access.
  38. 38. here’s an example of roaming. at&t sent me a text message telling me that they wanted to charge me $20 a megabyte to access their service because i was on someone else’s network. it’s expensive; carriers don’t like it. they don’t want to deal with someone else’s customers. and so this is one of OpenID’s challenges: we have lots of providers, but few relying parties.
  39. 39. Picnik disaggregation: the ability to choose the service that I want to use without having to import EVERYTHING AND without having to even create an account. this is in contrast, for example, to being forced to use a default service, like Photos on Facebook or how Apple refuses to let apps that compete with their own apps enter the AppStore.
  40. 40. Cloud computing what does open mean in the era of cloud computing? (CLICK)
  41. 41. c: icon by Seedling Design we’re going from owning our own hard drives with our data... (CLICK)
  42. 42. http:// icon by Seedling Design to relying on someone else to host our data for us. having the ability to move data from place to another — while retaining metadata will be essential.
  43. 43. http:// icons by Seedling Design and Fast Icon you’ve got your youtube, facebook, flickr... no one will need to do backups anymore, but this will have a profound impact on how you design services.
  44. 44. http:// icons by Seedling Design, etc hybrid applications like this essentially require a connection to function.
  45. 45. factoryjoe.com icons by Seedling Design
  46. 46. and we’re even seeing this creep into desktop applications like Keynote where there is now a Share menu... that I imagine will slowly replace the File menu (like the fax machine). defaults here are critical as well. note that Keynote defaults to sharing via iWork.com — not slideshare.net or even Google Docs...
  47. 47. and we’re even seeing this creep into desktop applications like Keynote where there is now a Share menu... that I imagine will slowly replace the File menu (like the fax machine). defaults here are critical as well. note that Keynote defaults to sharing via iWork.com — not slideshare.net or even Google Docs...
  48. 48. Social web which brings us to the social web. it’s one thing if you want to move your application from one company’s cloud instance to another. what happens when you want to move your identity and friends?
  49. 49. WWW the reality is, the web was built for sharing documents... (CLICK)
  50. 50. WWW icons by iconaholic.com not for connecting people — at least like people connect today.
  51. 51. ? ? ? ? WWW ? ? ? ? icons by iconaholic.com not for connecting people — at least like people connect today.
  52. 52. I think we can start to see where this is going — in a very basic way — by studying FriendFeed. Already they’re doing a lot of work to minimize the emphasis on services and are instead focused on two things: People and what they’re sharing. (next: feed formats)
  53. 53. But they’re ending up spending all kinds of resources just getting the basics working, since our feed formats like ATOM and RSS were designed with blog posts in mind, but people are doing a lot more on the web today, beyond blogging.
  54. 54. Diso this is really the premise behind the Diso Project: to make it make it easier to build social experiences on the web by deriving standards and formats from popular trends.
  55. 55. Diso Diso Project • http://diso-project.org this is really the premise behind the Diso Project: to make it make it easier to build social experiences on the web by deriving standards and formats from popular trends.
  56. 56. Diso Components* *subject to change (DON’T CLICK) identity & profile discovery & access control contacts & friends activity streams messaging groupings & shared spaces
  57. 57. Diso Components* 1. identity & profile 2. discovery & access control 3. contacts & friends 4. activity streams 5. messaging 6. groupings & shared spaces *subject to change (DON’T CLICK) identity & profile discovery & access control contacts & friends activity streams messaging groupings & shared spaces
  58. 58. Ubiquity of standards move an industry to compete at a new level Photo by grendelkhan but adoption of these technologies is key. I don’t want to compete on the level of social apps that exist today. we want to move up to a higher level of competition by commoditizing aspects of the social web that are hard today, but are also basic or fundamental.
  59. 59. ...leading to opportunities to innovate user experience Photo by Chris Metcalf in so doing, we create new opportunities to compete on the basis of better service and user experience.
  60. 60. so for example, with the spread of javascript-enabled browsers, we’re now seeing a venerable old project like Drupal be able to compete by enhancing the user experience. when I joined the project in 2004 as one of the few designers, i was basically forbidden from using javascript because it wasn’t yet “standard enough”. how times change!
  61. 61. Identity but all of this is predicated on developing a means for estabishing durable, cross-site identity on the web.
  62. 62. the individual is basic atomic unity of society.
  63. 63. You can’t have “social” without “society” we’re really talking about society — the collection of norms, habits and behaviors that define what a fairly large collection of people are all about.
  64. 64. and since change happens at the level of the individual a building block technology like openid is critical. the architecture of the social web must have the individual as its cornerstone.
  65. 65. Real identity it’s interesting to look at a current trend people are starting to use their real identity online.
  66. 66. Facebook recommendations No where is this more obvious than on Facebook. Here is a list of three people that Facebook has recommended to me. The second one was suggested because we went to the same high school. Kind of a stretch, right? I mean, what is that in the photo? A pillow? I have no idea WHO SHE IS
  67. 67. So let’s say I actually dive in and ask Facebook to list ALL the people it thinks I might know... this is where it gets interesting. (click) Now, here I see someone I know. I’ve met Eric in person; I could probably add him as a friend... but is it really him? It’s not like I have some shared secret with him to verify that this is actually an online representation of his...
  68. 68. So let’s say I actually dive in and ask Facebook to list ALL the people it thinks I might know... this is where it gets interesting. (click) Now, here I see someone I know. I’ve met Eric in person; I could probably add him as a friend... but is it really him? It’s not like I have some shared secret with him to verify that this is actually an online representation of his...
  69. 69. so I decide to do a search — and lo, out of 444 results, he comes up first. Sure, but this is the same guy from the previous page. (click) If we have 63 mutual friends, well, that’s starting make this more plausible...
  70. 70. so I decide to do a search — and lo, out of 444 results, he comes up first. Sure, but this is the same guy from the previous page. (click) If we have 63 mutual friends, well, that’s starting make this more plausible...
  71. 71. Ok, now I’m feeling pretty confident. In lieu of a shared secret between us, a familiar social graph is a reasonable substitute. Get that: by revealing one’s social connections I get closer to someone’s real identity.
  72. 72. your social graph is essentially a kind of identity fingerprint for people who know you and know who you know. but this is really only possible because my mutual friends shared their identities first.
  73. 73. @factoryjoe so some of you might know that I use “factoryjoe” as my username on the web. But, no one in the real world has any frigging clue who “factoryjoe” is, especially without context. And so people have come up to me and called me “Joe” without even thinking about it. This online identity was becoming better known than me!
  74. 74. @factoryjoe @chrismessina So I killed it. At least on Twitter. And now I’m just @chrismessina. Like I was before, and always have been. But I’ve seen other people do the same thing since I made this change. And it looks like it’s only becoming more common.
  75. 75. Let’s take a look at another example. Compare the chat list on the left with the one on the right. With AIM, you’ve got all these foreign-looking usernames... whereas on the right you have real names. CLICK - focus on pirillo [talk about Facebook’s early decision to swear off usernames]
  76. 76. Let’s take a look at another example. Compare the chat list on the left with the one on the right. With AIM, you’ve got all these foreign-looking usernames... whereas on the right you have real names. CLICK - focus on pirillo [talk about Facebook’s early decision to swear off usernames]
  77. 77. “l0ckergn0me” vs. Chris Pirillo understand that this DESIGN decision was as important as Flickr’s public-by-default decision. Heck, I don’t even know what a “locker gnome” is. But here’s the change.
  78. 78. Eventbox and you can see this in software like eventbox
  79. 79. Eventbox why does this option even exist? This to me proves that we are in a transitional period, from assumed aliases to one of real, public, transparent identities.
  80. 80. Eventbox why does this option even exist? This to me proves that we are in a transitional period, from assumed aliases to one of real, public, transparent identities.
  81. 81. even places like MySpace, where pseudonymity reigns is moving in this direction...
  82. 82. even places like MySpace, where pseudonymity reigns is moving in this direction...
  83. 83. morality, creativity, spontaneity, problem solving, lack of prejudice, Self-actualization acceptance of facts self-esteem, confidence, achievement, respect of others, Esteem respect by others friendship, family, sexual intimacy Love/belonging security of: body, employment, resources, Safety morality, the family, health, property breathing, food, water, sex, sleep, homeostasis, excretion Physiological Mazlow’s Hierarchy of Needs now, I think this what this means is that we’re seeing a shift to using real identity because the social web is becoming a increasingly important piece of many people “self-actualization”. self-actualization is from mazlow’s hierarchy of needs and is at the top of the pyramid here.
  84. 84. • facebook.com/chrismessina • friendfeed.com/chrismessina • google.com/profiles/chrismessina • twitter.com/chrismessina You can see this people try to “claim” their identity across the web (CLICK)
  85. 85. • facebook.com/chrismessina • friendfeed.com/chrismessina • google.com/profiles/chrismessina • twitter.com/chrismessina and course, companies are jumping over each other to be namespace for people on the web.
  86. 86. why do you think Facebook is getting into the username business after resisting so long?
  87. 87. Five rules The perpetual beta becomes a process for engaging customers. Share and share-alike data, reusing others’ and providing APIs to your own. Ignore the distinction between client and server. On the net, open APIs and standard protocols win. Lock-in comes from data accrual, owning a namespace or non-standard formats. remember Tim O’Reilly’s rules? Yeah, this one.
  88. 88. Five rules The perpetual beta becomes a process for engaging customers. Share and share-alike data, reusing others’ and providing APIs to your own. Ignore the distinction between client and server. On the net, open APIs and standard protocols win. Lock-in comes from data accrual, owning a namespace or non-standard formats. remember Tim O’Reilly’s rules? Yeah, this one. let’s look at what these namespaces look like on the web today.
  89. 89. this is how facebook presents me to the world. i can’t change this. I can’t pick which friends show up here. i can change my photo... but i can’t alter what’s presented here. this is all left up to facebook’s discretion.
  90. 90. friendfeed presents an activity-centric view of me. i can’t change how this looks, but at least it represents parts of what i’m actually doing
  91. 91. Google now lets me have quite a bit of control over my profile, but it makes me look like a google employee. oh, and everyone looks the same.
  92. 92. Meanwhile, Twitter is all about what I’m doing, but I can really only customize the colors and background image... but otherwise, that’s about it. without context, it can be a bit jarring.
  93. 93. So what if I wanted to just do something like this? I’m not saying this is the best webpage evar, but the point is, when I host my own identity, it’s up to ME how I present my identity to the world. And I believe that it’s at the level of the individual that all change and innovation begins and so the web’s architecture should reflect that.
  94. 94. and so this is why i use factoryjoe.com as my OpenID. It means that I, as an individual, am in charge of, and own my own identity. and what we need to develop, over time, is a way for people who own their own identities — regardless of whether they delegate to a service or not — to connect to the people and services that matter to them. (next: asshole)
  95. 95. * now, do you know what this is? it’s the asshole of the universe.
  96. 96. * Connect and like assholes, it seems that everyone wants to have a connect API these days.
  97. 97. Photo by Timothy Vogel the result is what we call the “OpenID NASCAR” where everyone wants their brand shown on login forms.... (CLICK)
  98. 98. ...like this.
  99. 99. when people really just want this. their goal is to get access to their account To be fair, this is merely an uncomfortable transitional step along a much longer path towards open identity on the web. it is a means to an end, but not the end that we seek.
  100. 100. Eventually, I think people will know their OpenID, just like their address, phone number, screennames, email, and so on... until we get to their OpenID. And just to be clear, an OpenID shouldn’t have to look like a URL. We’re working to fix that actually. But the primary thing you should take away from this point is that we’re creating a standard to make it possible to have durable, lasting identity on the web.
  101. 101. • What’s your address? Eventually, I think people will know their OpenID, just like their address, phone number, screennames, email, and so on... until we get to their OpenID. And just to be clear, an OpenID shouldn’t have to look like a URL. We’re working to fix that actually. But the primary thing you should take away from this point is that we’re creating a standard to make it possible to have durable, lasting identity on the web.
  102. 102. • What’s your address? • What’s your phone number? Eventually, I think people will know their OpenID, just like their address, phone number, screennames, email, and so on... until we get to their OpenID. And just to be clear, an OpenID shouldn’t have to look like a URL. We’re working to fix that actually. But the primary thing you should take away from this point is that we’re creating a standard to make it possible to have durable, lasting identity on the web.
  103. 103. • What’s your address? • What’s your phone number? • What’s your AOL screenname? Eventually, I think people will know their OpenID, just like their address, phone number, screennames, email, and so on... until we get to their OpenID. And just to be clear, an OpenID shouldn’t have to look like a URL. We’re working to fix that actually. But the primary thing you should take away from this point is that we’re creating a standard to make it possible to have durable, lasting identity on the web.
  104. 104. • What’s your address? • What’s your phone number? • What’s your AOL screenname? • What’s your email address? Eventually, I think people will know their OpenID, just like their address, phone number, screennames, email, and so on... until we get to their OpenID. And just to be clear, an OpenID shouldn’t have to look like a URL. We’re working to fix that actually. But the primary thing you should take away from this point is that we’re creating a standard to make it possible to have durable, lasting identity on the web.
  105. 105. • What’s your address? • What’s your phone number? • What’s your AOL screenname? • What’s your email address? • What’s your MySpace? Eventually, I think people will know their OpenID, just like their address, phone number, screennames, email, and so on... until we get to their OpenID. And just to be clear, an OpenID shouldn’t have to look like a URL. We’re working to fix that actually. But the primary thing you should take away from this point is that we’re creating a standard to make it possible to have durable, lasting identity on the web.
  106. 106. • What’s your address? • What’s your phone number? • What’s your AOL screenname? • What’s your email address? • What’s your MySpace? • Twitter? Eventually, I think people will know their OpenID, just like their address, phone number, screennames, email, and so on... until we get to their OpenID. And just to be clear, an OpenID shouldn’t have to look like a URL. We’re working to fix that actually. But the primary thing you should take away from this point is that we’re creating a standard to make it possible to have durable, lasting identity on the web.
  107. 107. • What’s your address? • What’s your phone number? • What’s your AOL screenname? • What’s your email address? • What’s your MySpace? • Twitter? • Are you on Facebook? Eventually, I think people will know their OpenID, just like their address, phone number, screennames, email, and so on... until we get to their OpenID. And just to be clear, an OpenID shouldn’t have to look like a URL. We’re working to fix that actually. But the primary thing you should take away from this point is that we’re creating a standard to make it possible to have durable, lasting identity on the web.
  108. 108. • What’s your address? • What’s your phone number? • What’s your AOL screenname? • What’s your email address? • What’s your MySpace? • Twitter? • Are you on Facebook? • What’s your OpenID? Eventually, I think people will know their OpenID, just like their address, phone number, screennames, email, and so on... until we get to their OpenID. And just to be clear, an OpenID shouldn’t have to look like a URL. We’re working to fix that actually. But the primary thing you should take away from this point is that we’re creating a standard to make it possible to have durable, lasting identity on the web.
  109. 109. Why standards?
  110. 110. The open, social web will be built on standards that are free to implement and that encourage competition at the layer of service and user experience.
  111. 111. so, one example of this is email standards like SMTP and IMAP. These protocols are dinosaurs... (CLICK)
  112. 112. but have allowed services like Gmail to be started relatively recently and widespread adoption by creating the incentive to innovate on top of a basic set of features.
  113. 113. where they’ve created this amazing experience in the iphone version of Gmail. Largely because of standards.
  114. 114. similarly, Twitter has grown in large part because of its use of SMS, a standard feature of phones that has been around for ages — that few had previously taken advantage of. Ironically, you could argue that RSS on Blogger was what lead Ev Williams to his original success. So, he just seems to be at the right moment leveraging standards as they become ubiquitous in the marketplace.
  115. 115.  of course, one of the best examples of my point is Apple.
  116. 116. and indeed, one of the best examples of the power of standards to change an industry is the iphone. it is the benefactor of years of open standards development. so clearly the open, social web will have an impact on mobile development.
  117. 117. IEEE 802.11 (WiFi) International Mobile Telecommunications-2000 (IMT-2000) vCalendar Bluetooth Short Message Service (SMS/MMS) JPEG MPEG-4 Part 14, ISO/IEC 14496-14:2003 (MP4) SQLite, TXT MPEG-1 Audio Layer 3 (MP3) vCard, etc SMTP, IMAP, POP3 HTTP, CSS, JS, etc and indeed, one of the best examples of the power of standards to change an industry is the iphone. it is the benefactor of years of open standards development. so clearly the open, social web will have an impact on mobile development.
  118. 118. Furthermore, WebKit is the rendering engine that powers the Safari browser. this is an open source project
  119. 119. Furthermore, WebKit is the rendering engine that powers the Safari browser. this is an open source project
  120. 120. webkit is also the rendering engine that powers Google’s Chromium/Chrome open source browser project.
  121. 121. webkit is also the rendering engine that powers Google’s Chromium/Chrome open source browser project.
  122. 122. the Palm Pre’s applications are also all webkit apps. see how important standards are here?
  123. 123. So, just as WebKit is becoming the new operating level, the underpinings of Mac OS X itself is UNIX, which is open source. Apple leverages open source and community-based peer-production and ostensibly sells an experience on top of it. The value is not in the software, per se, but in the designed experience and vision carried through Apple products.
  124. 124. So, just as WebKit is becoming the new operating level, the underpinings of Mac OS X itself is UNIX, which is open source. Apple leverages open source and community-based peer-production and ostensibly sells an experience on top of it. The value is not in the software, per se, but in the designed experience and vision carried through Apple products.
  125. 125. Vancouver, BC and I think we’re starting to see our civic institutions start to raise up to meet these challenges. for example, here in Vancouver, as we heard earlier today, you guys are already ahead of the game (CLICK).
  126. 126. a city that thinks like the web. working on building “a city that thinks like the web”... using open data, open standards and open source. and that’s a great start! and where we need to take this next of course (CLICK)
  127. 127. Open Data, Open Standards, Open Source working on building “a city that thinks like the web”... using open data, open standards and open source. and that’s a great start! and where we need to take this next of course (CLICK)
  128. 128. The open, social web is to the open social web, where more standards, more data, and more open source will provide us with the opportunities to compete on a whole new level of user experience.
  129. 129. BECAUSE Our fundamental challenge is to build technologies that enhance the network and serve people so that they in turn can build better and richer societies.
  130. 130. Our challenge is to build technologies that enhance the network and serve people so that they in turn can build better and richer societies. BECAUSE Our fundamental challenge is to build technologies that enhance the network and serve people so that they in turn can build better and richer societies.
  131. 131. fin. chris@citizenagency.com • @chrismessina • factoryjoe.com Color palette: oddend by martin Typeface: FTF Flama™ by Mario Feliciano so that’s it. questions?
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