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Анна Мамаєва: When SAFe is safe. Agile для дорослих компаній

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Kyiv Project Management Day 2016 Анна Мамаєва: When SAFe is safe. Agile для дорослих компаній

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Анна Мамаєва: When SAFe is safe. Agile для дорослих компаній

  1. 1. eleks.com When SAFe is safe: Agile по-дорослому by Anna Mamaieva, Senior Project Manager
  2. 2. Let’s let's get acquainted Senior Project Manager, ELEKS 7+ years in IT (Project/Product Management) • Mobile applications (iOS, Android) • Web-solutions development and management (Java, .Net) • Product developing and Marketing • Cross-functional team leadership • SAFe Agile certified (2016)
  3. 3. Agenda • Doing Agile vs. being Agile • Do not trouble trouble until… • House of rising Lean • Framework overview
  4. 4. stateofagile.versionone.com
  5. 5. • Is responsiveness works as a differentiator? • Future characterized by: Understand level of adaptivness ➔ high uncertainty? ➔ high levels of innovation vs. maintenance? • Is the organization planning or undergoing a major pivot or shift? • Does first-to-market matter for our business?
  6. 6. Environment to scale right ● Leadership buy-in Management should communicate goals consistently and often to the rest of the organization ● Support autonomy Teams should be allowed to create, inspect and adapt their own processes ● Encourage collaboration ● Standardize only what is important some standardization can help scale your agility by helping your organization understand the big picture
  7. 7. Culture eats strategy for breakfast
  8. 8. ● Interfacing between teams ● Achieving technical consistency ● Interpretation of agile differs between teams ● High-level requirements management largely missing in agile ● Gap between long and short term planning Coordination challenges
  9. 9. LeSS, DAD or SAFe®? Large-scale Scrum (LeSS) regular Scrum applied in multiple levels to suit large-scale development; several feature teams under one Product Owner (PO) Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD) people-first, learning-oriented hybrid agile approach to IT solution delivery; a modification of Scrum with elements added from a variety of other methods Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe®) highly structured and prescriptive method; differentiates between Team, Program, and Portfolio levels www.agilescaling.org
  10. 10. Embrace Lean-Agile values House of Lean LEADERSHIP Respectfor peopleandculture Flow Innovation Relentless improvement VALUE Value in the sustainably shortest lead time 1. Take an economic view 2. Apply systems thinking 3. Assume variability; preserve options 4. Build incrementally with fast, integrated learning cycles 5. Base milestones on objective evaluation of working systems 6. Visualize and limit WIP, reduce batch sizes, and manage queue lengths 7. Apply cadence, synchronize with cross-domain planning 8. Unlock the intrinsic motivation of knowledge workers 9. Decentralize decision-making
  11. 11. LEVELS
  12. 12. Portfolio, Value Stream, Program, and Team levels 1. Each SAFe portfolio contains a set of Value Streams and the additional elements necessary to provide funding and governance for the products, services, and Solutions that the Enterprise needs to fulfill some element of the business strategy. 2. The Value Stream Level is intended for builders of large and complex solutions that typically require multiple ARTs 3. The Team and Program Levels make up the long-lived, self- organizing virtual organization known as the Agile Release Train (ART). Without teams, there can be no program.
  13. 13. The art of ART 1. The train departs the station and arrives at the next destination on a reliable schedule, which provides for fixed cadence, standard ART velocity, and predictable planning (and in many cases, cadence- based releases). 2. All “cargo,” including prototypes, models, software, hardware, documentation, etc., goes on the train
  14. 14. THE PEOPLE
  15. 15. Roles and responsibilities Team Level small cross-functional teams that are empowered to make localized decisions to get work done Program Level • The Release Train Engineer facilitates the activities of the Agile Release Train, much like the Scrum Master facilitates the activities of the team. • Product Management is responsible for the Program Vision and Roadmap. • The System Architect/Engineer plays a critical role in helping align teams in a common technical direction toward accomplishment of the mission, Vision, and Roadmap.
  16. 16. Roles and responsibilities Portfolio Level • We have the Program Portfolio Management team responsible for strategy and investment funding, program execution, and governance. • The Enterprise Architect works across Value Streams and Agile Release Trains to provide strategic technical guidance in such areas as technology stack recommendations, interoperability of solutions, and hosting strategies • The Epic Owner is a role, not a title. This person takes responsibility for the business case and implementation guidance of initiatives, called Epics in SAFe
  17. 17. THE BACKLOGS
  18. 18. One backlog to rule them all • The backlogs contain prioritized functionality and enablers. Enablers are the exploration, architecture, and infrastructure needed to support the functionality. • Epics are identified and progressively elaborated as they flow through the Portfolio Kanban System. The Kanban System makes the strategic business initiatives visible and brings a structured analysis process driven by economics. There are Kanban Systems at the Value Stream and Program Levels, as well.
  19. 19. THE CADENCE
  20. 20. Heartbeat and Release • the Program Level, the teams on the Agile Release Train work in 8 – 12 week increments, called Programs Increments, or PIs. A PI begins with a higher level planning event, called PI Planning, and ends with a demo and retrospective known as “Inspect and Adapt.” • The teams on the Agile Release Train develop on cadence, but can release any time based on business needs. • At the Value Stream Level, additional coordination activities may be required to align all Agile Release Trains (and Suppliers) in the Value Stream.
  21. 21. VALUE DELIVERY
  22. 22. Budget meeting wishes • The connection between the enterprise business strategy and the Portfolio is through Strategic Themes. • Budgets are allocated to Value Streams in order to decentralize decisions which can be made quickly and efficiently at the Value Stream Level. • Sequencing of Epics, Capabilities, and Features is driven by a Lean approach called Weighted Shortest Job First (WSJF) which looks at the cost of delaying one item in order to do another. • The Economic Framework is a set of decision rules that aligns everyone to both the mission and the financial constraints. • The business value delivered at the end of each Program Increment is assessed by the Business Owners to measure planned vs. actual.
  23. 23. Inspired by Technology. Driven by Value. Find us at eleks.com Have a question? Write to eleksinfo@eleks.com

Editor's Notes

  • OVERVIEW: Here, you can discuss the Iteration at the Team Level and the Program Increment, or PI, and Program Level

    SAMPLE SPEAKER NOTES:
    At the Team Level, the teams work in two week increments called Iterations. They begin each Sprint with planning and end with a demo and a retrospective
    At the Program Level, the teams on the Agile Release Train work in 8 – 12 week increments, called Programs Increments, or PIs. A PI begins with a higher level planning event, called PI Planning, and ends with a demo and retrospective known as “Inspect and Adapt.”
    The teams on the Agile Release Train develop on cadence, but can release any time based on business needs.
    At the Value Stream Level, additional coordination activities may be required to align all Agile Release Trains (and Suppliers) in the Value Stream.
    Are there any other questions about cadence and synchronization for alignment?
  • OVERVIEW: Here, you’ll discuss how the enterprise strategy is translated into a solution to maximize value to the customer. You may or may not go into detail based on your audience.
     
    SAMPLE SPEAKER NOTES:
    The connection between the enterprise business strategy and the Portfolio is through Strategic Themes. This brief list guides the Economic Framework, Budgets, and backlog decisions.
    Budgets are allocated to Value Streams in order to decentralize decisions which can be made quickly and efficiently at the Value Stream Level. Would you like to hear more about Lean-Agile Budgeting?
    Epics are progressively analyzed as they move through the Portfolio Kanban System to determine the most important initiatives to do at that given point in time. It also assures capacity matching.
    Sequencing of Epics, Capabilities, and Features is driven by a Lean approach called Weighted Shortest Job First (WSJF) which looks at the cost of delaying one item in order to do another. It looks at both the cost of delay and the effort to complete it. Would you like to hear more about WSJF?
    Prioritizing functionality is done by Program Portfolio Management at the Portfolio Level, Solution Management at the Value Stream Level, Product Management at the Program Level, and Product Owners at the Team Level. This approach requires an understanding of decentralized decision-making, which is SAFe Principle #9.
    The Economic Framework is a set of decision rules that aligns everyone to both the mission and the financial constraints. SAFe’s first Principle is to take an economic view, which highlights the key role that economics plays in successful Solution development.
    The Solution Intent is the evolving understanding of what needs to be built and how it should be built. It is often more economically beneficial to wait and explore options as facts surface due to the high cost of change later in the process. Set-based design practices help avoid committing too early to design and requirements
    The business value delivered at the end of each Program Increment is assessed by the Business Owners to measure planned vs. actual. The business is responsible for prioritizing and the teams are responsible for delivering.
    Finally, the business determines when a solution needs to be released, rather than the more rigid waterfall approach of delivering everything at the end.
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