Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Upcoming SlideShare
What to Upload to SlideShare
Next

5

Share

Tuga IT 2017 - Strengthen Culture to drive Business agility

– What is Organizational Culture?
– What is Business agility?
– Why is Culture so important for your Business?
– Can Culture drive your Business?
– How to decode your Culture?
– Can Agile help you strengthen your Organizational Culture?
– How about your Business bottom-line?

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Tuga IT 2017 - Strengthen Culture to drive Business agility

  1. 1. Strengthen Culture to drive Business agility A gentle introduction, by Nuno Rafael Gomes Tuga IT 2017 Conference May 18-20, 2017
  2. 2. TUGA IT 2017 LISBON, PORTUGAL
  3. 3. THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS PLATINUM GOLD SILVER
  4. 4. PARTICIPATING COMMUNITIES CLOUD PRO PT
  5. 5. About me Twitter: @nrgomes Linkedin: linkedin.com/in/nrgomes Blog: medium.com/@nrgomes #lean #leanthinking #leanstartup #agile #scrum #kaizen #kata #lego #seriousplay #learning #seriouslearning #coaching Lean Agile Coach Agile Connect® Founder Serious LearningTM Founder
  6. 6. Agenda ➔ Organizational Culture. ➔ Culture models. ➔ Assess Organizational Culture… why? ➔ Assess Organizational Culture… how? ➔ Lean Thinking. ➔ Lean as Culture? ➔ Agile Mindset. ➔ Agile as Culture? ➔ Scrum. ➔ Scrum as Culture? ➔ How about other Agile practices?
  7. 7. Agenda ➔ Business agility. ➔ Strengthen Business agility… how? ➔ Change Culture? ➔ A special word to all Scrum Masters :-) ➔ Takeways ➔ Q&A ➔ Thank you!
  8. 8. Organizational Culture
  9. 9. “Culture can be defined as the way things get done around here.” Deal and Kennedy
  10. 10. “Culture is a system of values and norms that are shared among a group of people and that when taken together constitute a design for living.” Hofstede, Namenwirth and Weber
  11. 11. “Culture is the collective programming of the mind which distinguishes the members of one group from another.” Geert Hofstede
  12. 12. “Is culture the software of the mind?” Nuno Rafael Gomes
  13. 13. Culture models
  14. 14. “Essentially, all models are wrong, but some are useful.” George E. P. Box
  15. 15. William E. Schneider
  16. 16. Collaboration Control Cultivation Competence People Reality Possibility Organization
  17. 17. Schneider’s Culture model Control Culture: - Organization (or impersonal) oriented. - Reality (aka, “the present”) oriented. - “We succeed by getting and keeping control.” Competence Culture: - Organization (or impersonal) oriented. - Possibility (aka, “the future”) oriented. - “We succeed by being the best.”
  18. 18. Schneider’s Culture model Collaboration Culture: - People (personal) oriented. - Reality (aka, “the present”) oriented. - “We succeed by working together.” Cultivation Culture: - People (or personal) oriented. - Possibility (aka, “the future”) oriented. - “We succeed by growing people who fulfil our vision.”
  19. 19. Participative Adaptive Collaboration Teamwork Full use of everyone’s strengths Authoritative/directive Prescriptive Control Get and keep control Catalyst/purposeful Empowering Cultivation Grow and develop people as we pursue a high purpose Standard-setting Task driven Competence Pursue excellence and be the best People Reality Possibility Organization
  20. 20. Edgar H. Schein
  21. 21. Schein’s Culture model Artefacts are visible organisational structure, processes, and behaviour. They are what you see and hear. Espoused values are the official statements, documents, presentations, etc. that supposedly communicate the values, principles, ethics, and vision of the organisation. Underlying, shared, tacit assumptions are the actual essence of culture. These are the jointly learned values and beliefs that are taken for granted.
  22. 22. John Y. Shook
  23. 23. Shook’s Change Culture model From a conceptual point of view, Shook’s model is roughly similar to Schein’s: - What We Do (Shook) ≈ Artifacts (Schein). - Values and Attitudes (Shook) ≈ Espoused Values (Shein). - Culture (Shook) ≈ Shared, Tacit Assumptions (Shein). But Shook’s model is fundamentally a Change Culture model, based on NUMMI’s story, a joint venture experiment by Toyota Motor Corp. and General Motors Co.
  24. 24. Michael Sahota
  25. 25. Sahota’s Culture model (Laloux based) Organizational Culture as the Core of the Organization, “the wibbly, wobbly thing that connects everything.” 2 Dimensions: - Structure: the ways that we organize our outer world: leadership “style”, management practices, organizational structure, defined roles and policies (rules), processes in place, systems (hiring, work, evaluation, careers, pay), how we decide, how we give feedback, etc... - Consciousness: the intangible way of being that reflects how we are as human beings, that is, our inner world: organization purpose, unwritten rules and norms, identity, values, beliefs, behaviours, etc..
  26. 26. Assess Organizational Culture… why?
  27. 27. “Culture eats strategy for breakfast… and for lunch and dinner.” Nuno Rafael Gomes and Torben Rick, adapted from Peter F. Drucker
  28. 28. Assess Organizational Culture… how?
  29. 29. Assess Organizational Culture… how? A possible solution: - We can use one of the previous culture models... - … and build some powerful questions around it. - … let’s use Schneider’s culture model and do a survey… with you! So, your challenge for the next 10 minutes is: - Answer the following survey on your smartphone. - 20 questions in 10 minutes = 30 secs per question. - You are going to assess your own current organization’s culture! - Write your answers on a post-it :-)
  30. 30. Culture Survey
  31. 31. A few considerations before start - There aren't good or bad organizational cultures. They just are :-) - To improve a culture the first step is to understand it, hence the survey :-) - Results can vary from person to person within the same organization: understanding is always a matter of (personal) perception. - Results can also vary from team/department to team/department in medium/large organizations: although sharing the same “substrate” different teams/departments can have different “ways of getting things done”. - Also results can vary from country to country on multinational organizations :-) - Usually, the final result is a predominant culture + elements from the other 3. - The current predominant culture will be the average of all employees’ results.
  32. 32. Collective results: Collaboration 7% Control 53% Cultivation 20% Competence 20% People Reality Possibility Organization
  33. 33. Control culture Leadership focus Authoritarian/directive, maintain power Management style Conservative, policy and procedure oriented Organizational form Hierarchy Role of employee Compliance, adherence to role requirements Task focus Individuals stay within a function Nature of power/authority Role/position titular (= impressive title) Decision making Very thorough, push for certainty Approach to managing change Mandate it, resistance to change Key norms Order, certainty, systematism Climate Serious, restrained
  34. 34. Collaboration culture Leadership focus Team builder, coach Management style Collegial, democratic Organizational form Group cluster Role of employee Collaborate, be a team player, utilise others as resources Task focus Generalist Nature of power/authority Relationship Decision making Experimental, lots of brainstorming, trusting Approach to managing change Team calls for change, open to change Key norms Synergy, egalitarianism Climate Esprit de corps/camaraderie
  35. 35. Cultivation culture Leadership focus Catalyst, empower/enable people Management style People driven, nurturant Organizational form Wheel-like circular lattice Role of employee Express yourself, be willing to change, develop, grow Task focus Functionalist, generalist & specialist Nature of power/authority Charisma Decision making Participative, organic/evolutionary Approach to managing change Embrace/assume change, change is automatic Key norms Humanistic, growth & development, freedom to make mistakes Climate Likely/magnetic, caring
  36. 36. Competence culture Leadership focus Standard setter, taskmaster Management style Task driven, rational/analytical Organizational form Matrix adhocracy Role of employee Be an expert, function independently Task focus Specialist Nature of power/authority Expertise Decision making Very analytical, formal logic Approach to managing change Achievement goals drive change, open to change Key norms Professionalism, meritocracy Climate Competitive, intense pace
  37. 37. Lean Thinking
  38. 38. The Lean Thinking Way Throughout decades of experimentation on how to deliver value to demand and build sustainable human systems, many organizations from around the world have come to value:
  39. 39. The Lean Thinking Way People over everything else Interactions over individuals Learning over knowledge Value over products and services Intent over strategy and operations That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more.
  40. 40. Lean as Culture?
  41. 41. Lean Values (my view today) Collaboration Interactions Intent Control Cultivation People Learning Value Competence People Reality Possibility Organization
  42. 42. Lean as Culture Lean Thinking is all about People First! Lean aligns well with Collaboration & Cultivation cultures!
  43. 43. Agile Mindset
  44. 44. “Agile is a mindset driven by 4 Values and 12 Principles." Nuno Rafael and many others :-)
  45. 45. Agile Manifesto We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work we have come to value:
  46. 46. Agile Values Individuals and interactions over processes and tools Working software over comprehensive documentation Customer collaboration over contract negotiation Responding to change over following a plan That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more.
  47. 47. Agile Principles Satisfy the customer Welcome change Deliver frequently Work together Trust & support everyone Face-to-face interactions Working products Sustainable pace Technical excellence Simplicity Emergent design Reflect & adjust regularly
  48. 48. Agile Practices Scrum, Extreme Programming (XP), Crystal Clear methods, Kanban, Dynamic systems development method (DSDM), Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD), Adaptive software development (ASD), Xtreme Decoupled Engineering (XDE), LeSS, Nexus, Scrum @ Scale, and many others...
  49. 49. Agile as Culture?
  50. 50. Agile Values (my view today) Collaboration Individuals & interactions Customer collaboration Control Cultivation Responding to change Competence Working software People Reality Possibility Organization
  51. 51. Agile Principles (my view today) Collaboration Deliver frequently Work together Face-to-face interactions Emergent design Reflect & adjust regularly Control Cultivation Satisfy the customer Welcome change Trust & support everyone Sustainable pace Simplicity Competence Working products Technical excellence People Reality Possibility Organization
  52. 52. Agile as Culture Agile is all about People First! Agile aligns well with Collaboration & Cultivation cultures! Validated in 2010 by Michael Spayd!
  53. 53. Scrum
  54. 54. From Scrum Guide: Scrum is a framework for developing and sustaining complex products. Scrum is a framework within which people can address complex adaptive problems, while productively and creatively delivering products of the highest possible value. Scrum is also a “way of getting things done”, thus, Culture.
  55. 55. Scrum Values Commitment Focus Openness Respect Courage
  56. 56. Scrum as Culture?
  57. 57. Agile Principles (my view today) Collaboration Focus Openness Control Cultivation Commitment Respect Courage Competence People Reality Possibility Organization
  58. 58. Scrum as Culture Scrum is all about People First! Scrum aligns well with Collaboration & Cultivation cultures!
  59. 59. How about other Agile practices?
  60. 60. Culture and other Agile Practices What do you think?
  61. 61. Business agility
  62. 62. “The ability of a business system to rapidly respond to change by adapting its initial stable configuration.” Wikipedia Evan Leybourn, A. Wieland and C.M. Wallenburg
  63. 63. Business agility (my view today) Collaboration Responding to change (present challenges) Control Cultivation Responding to change (future possibilities) Competence People Reality Possibility Organization
  64. 64. Business agility as Culture Business agility is all about responding to change! In other words, is all about how fast can we learn? Business agility aligns well with a Collaboration culture! … if looking into the present challenges. Business agility aligns well with a Cultivation culture! ... if looking into the future possibilities.
  65. 65. Strengthen Business agility… how?
  66. 66. Top 3 Agile barriers Ability to change organizational culture (52%) General resistance to change (41%) Try to fit agile elements into a non-agile framework (35%)
  67. 67. Strengthen Business agility… how? It depends :-) … of your starting point, that is, your organizational culture! You need to understand your culture first! Pick a culture model and do a survey as we did! Then explore your culture compatibility w/ Agile practices. And remember… this is only a gentle introduction :-)
  68. 68. Culture compatibility (my view today) Collaboration Lean Thinking Agile Mindset Scrum LeSS, Scrum @ Scale, Nexus Control Kanban Kaizen philosophy Cultivation Lean Thinking Agile Mindset Scrum Lean Startup Competence Extreme Programming (XP) Extreme Manufacturing (XM) Software Craftsmanship People Reality Possibility Organization
  69. 69. Change Culture?
  70. 70. Change Culture… is it possible? From Cultural change that sticks (HBR 2012): 1. Match strategy and culture. 2. Focus on a few critical shifts in behavior. 3. Honor the strengths of your existing culture. 4. Integrate formal and informal interventions. 5. Measure and monitor cultural evolution: business performance, critical behaviors, milestones, underlying beliefs, feelings, and mindsets.
  71. 71. If Collaboration or Cultivation...
  72. 72. If Collaboration or Cultivation… - 1/2 Goal: Improve it and build a learning organization! 1. First of all, nurture it! 2. If too extreme, add a few elements from other cultures to bring balance into the equation. Some examples: - Competence: professionalism, technical excellence, ... - Control: systematism, kanban, data-driven decisions, ... 3. Improve the cross-functionality of Teams: from talking to customers, build stuff, sell stuff, to keep “things” running! 4. Regularly coach People (team members, managers, executives) and Teams about the chosen Agile practices & thinking.
  73. 73. If Collaboration or Cultivation… - 2/2 5. Measure and monitor cultural evolution: business performance, teams’ performance, underlying beliefs, feelings, mindsets, culture… 6. Improve, improve, improve… kaizen! 7. Celebrate together the little victories often :-)
  74. 74. If Control or Competence...
  75. 75. If Control or Competence ... 2 possible paths: “Open & reinforce it with Teams”, “easier” but limited. “Shift to adjacent Culture”, harder but more powerful.
  76. 76. “Open & reinforce it with Teams” - 1/2 Goal: Strengthen current Organizational Culture with Teams. 1. Get buy-in from top-management (non-negotiable). 2. Run the above culture survey to understand the current organizational culture, that is, where you are today. 3. Choose an Agile practice that “matches it”: kanban, kaizen, extreme programming (XP), craftsmanship, … 4. Build Teams as cross-functional as possible, from talking to customers, build stuff, sell stuff, to keep “things” running. If limited cross-functionality, start anyway… as you have to start from somewhere :-)
  77. 77. “Open & reinforce it with Teams” - 2/2 5. Make everything visible (the open part, that is, transparency) using information radiators: work in progress and done, decisions, decision making processes, team members & identities… 6. Regularly coach People (team members, managers, executives) and Teams about the chosen Agile practices & thinking. 7. Measure and monitor cultural evolution: business performance, teams’ performance, underlying beliefs, feelings, mindsets, culture… 8. Improve, improve, improve… kaizen! 9. Celebrate together the little victories often :-)
  78. 78. “Shift to adjacent Culture” - 1/3 Goal: Shift from one core culture to another, that is, shift to an lean/agile mindset, that is, transform culture. 1. Get buy-in from top-management (non-negotiable). 2. Run the above culture survey to understand the current organizational culture, that is, where you are today. 3. Start small (1 cross-functional team is fine) and change practice (to Scrum, Lean software development or Lean startup) to change people’s behaviours, in order to change the underlying thinking later (Shook’s model). 4. Build a “culture bubble” with clear communication/translation “interfaces” to the “outside world”, to protect the “bubble”.
  79. 79. “Shift to adjacent Culture” - 2/3 5. Expand the “bubble” to other cross-functional teams. Seize these opportunities to improve the cross-functionality of the Teams in the “bubble”! 6. Change structure (processes, systems, policies, and any other “thing” that influences people’s behaviours) as needed (and you will!) when scaling out the “bubble”. Always remember: culture always follows structure! 7. Expand the “bubble” to other departments. 8. Move to the adjacent culture (Schneider’s model) to reduce the transformation scope to People only (ignore the possibility/reality duality): - From Control to Collaboration. - From Competence to Cultivation.
  80. 80. “Shift to adjacent Culture” - 3/3 9. Regularly coach People (team members, managers, executives) and Teams about the organizational changes and chosen Agile practices & thinking. 10. Measure and monitor cultural evolution: business performance, teams’ performance, underlying beliefs, feelings, mindsets, culture… 11. Improve, improve, improve… kaizen! 12. Celebrate together the little victories often :-)
  81. 81. A special word to all Scrum Masters :-)
  82. 82. From Scrum Guide: The Scrum Master is responsible for ensuring Scrum is understood and enacted. Scrum Masters do this by ensuring that the Scrum Team adheres to Scrum theory, practices, and rules. The Scrum Master is a servant-leader for the Scrum Team. The Scrum Master helps those outside the Scrum Team understand which of their interactions with the Scrum Team are helpful and which aren’t. The Scrum Master helps everyone change these interactions to maximize the value created by the Scrum Team. … The Scrum Master serves the Product Owner in several ways, including… … The Scrum Master serves the Development Team in several ways, including...
  83. 83. From Scrum Guide: … The Scrum Master serves the organization in several ways, including: - Leading and coaching the organization in its Scrum adoption; - Planning Scrum implementations within the organization; - Helping employees and stakeholders understand and enact Scrum and empirical product development; - Causing change that increases the productivity of the Scrum Team; and, - Working with other Scrum Masters to increase the effectiveness of the application of Scrum in the organization. In short: We need you!
  84. 84. Takeways
  85. 85. Some conclusions :-) Inspired to be a Change Agent?
  86. 86. Q&A
  87. 87. PLEASE FILL IN EVALUATION FORMS FRIDAY, MAY 19th SATURDAY, MAY 20th https://survs.com/survey/cprwce7pi 8 https://survs.com/survey/l9kksmlzd 8 YOUR OPINION IS IMPORTANT!
  88. 88. THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS PLATINU M GOL D SILVE R
  89. 89. Thank You! Tweet: @nrgomes #tugait #culture #agility
  90. 90. Special thanks Special thanks for the amazing images from: ➔ Jason Yip ➔ Barry O’ Reilly ➔ Michael Sahota ➔ Torben Rick ➔ Ahmed Sidky ➔ VersionOne (State of Agile Report)
  • SyahrialMaulana2

    Nov. 10, 2020
  • whilpert

    Jun. 21, 2019
  • haoyonggang

    Mar. 31, 2019
  • radenkuat

    Jan. 30, 2019
  • pedalboy

    Nov. 2, 2017

– What is Organizational Culture? – What is Business agility? – Why is Culture so important for your Business? – Can Culture drive your Business? – How to decode your Culture? – Can Agile help you strengthen your Organizational Culture? – How about your Business bottom-line?

Views

Total views

462

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

4

Actions

Downloads

0

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

5

×