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Creating Passion Driven Teams

Can passion be taught? Can it be fostered? The answer is yes. But perhaps more accurately, a team leader must create the right conditions for passion to emerge. Those conditions must be nurtured, not unlike a gardener creating the right conditions for his plants to flourish. Make your job easier. Get the inside scoop on the secrets of success that motivate teams to top performance. In the matrix of workplace roles and responsibilities, managers are pivotal to corporate success. Yet a manager is often the unsung hero who must adapt to demands from all sides—and do so with little or no training, and without mentorship for the role. Learn from Dan Bobinski, who draws from 20 years of consulting experience, extensive studies of best practices, and the latest in neuroscience research. You'll learn the principles and methods top managers use to develop passionate, engaged employees who are dedicated to success. You'll be able to:

— Motivate without manipulating
— Turn mistakes into a fervent drive for quality
— Equip teams to enthusiastically adapt to change
— Create environments in which people strive for excellence—and more
Today's workforce requires managers to be more than just a person in charge. Creating Passion-Driven Teams show you how to tap your team's natural motivations and achieve consistent, sustained top performance.

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Creating Passion Driven Teams

  1. 1. Some Impressionistic takes from the book of Dan Bobinski “Creating Passion Driven Teams ” by Ramki ramaddster@gmail.com
  2. 2. About the Author  Dan Bobinski is president of Leadership Development, Inc., and director of the Center for Workplace Excellence.  He has been providing management training and coaching to Fortune 500 businesses, as well as small and mid-sized businesses, since 1989.  In addition to being a dynamic public speaker, Bobinski is also a prolific writer on workplace issues. His Workplace Excellence blog (Workplace.excellence.com has been listed among the top 100 daily must-reads for entrepreneurs, and his newspaper column on workplace issues is syndicated internationally.  Bobinski’s writing has also appeared in the Times of London, CXO magazine, My Business magazine, the Journal of the Institute of Management Services, and hundreds of business newsletters, newspapers, and periodicals around the world.
  3. 3. Key Concepts from the Book- 1/2  Great managers spend time being “Builders” who mentor team members and build them up to become valued members of the company with a passion for their work.  Organizations need clearly defined job duties and responsibilities for all team members.  Positions should be classified as either leadership, management, or front-line employees. Each classification should understand what its raw product is, what its process is, and what its outcome should be.  Micromanagers are often front-line employees who are promoted to management and not given the training needed to understand their new roles.  Micromanagers thrive on hearing that they are doing a good job, and they often step in to fix things their employees should be responsible for.
  4. 4. Key Concepts from the Book- 1/2  To stop micromanagement, managers should be trained to think differently about their roles and to understand that a new set of core competencies are expected of them.  People with higher Emotional Intelligence scores are often better managers than people with lower scores.  Regular communication, even casual “water cooler conversations,” are good opportunities for managers to keep team members in the loop and motivated.  When managers delegate tasks, they should delegate responsibility, authority, and accountability.  Meetings should always have a purpose.  Good listening skills are essential in gaining the trust of team members.  Conflict should never be allowed to fester; it should be dealt with quickly and openly.  Good training programs can save companies hundreds of thousands of dollars by reducing employee turnover rates.
  5. 5. Are you a Builder or Climber ?
  6. 6. Are you a Builder or Climber ?  Experienced and new managers alike often dream of elevating their teams to new levels. For teams to achieve these goals and aspirations, they must be passionate and enthusiastic about the work they are doing. Moreover, for this passion to exist, working conditions must be just right.  Sadly, many work environments lack the structure, communication, and well-defined roles and responsibilities to nurture that passion, and teams end up being less effective than they could be.  To create a passion-driven team, leaders must understand the working conditions needed on both a group and an individual level that will make their team members happy and productive again. However, one cannot force passion. Leaders must provide the right working conditions, tools, and support for team members to find their own passions.  For leaders to create passion-driven teams requires a commitment to lifelong learning. A leader who becomes a student of people, perhaps by working with a mastermind group or management coach, does the best at this task.
  7. 7. Are you a Builder or Climber ?  Dozens of different leadership styles have been studied over the years, but there is one common factor present in all of them: how people interact with and value the people they lead. Two different labels have been assigned to the most and least extreme examples of this trait:  Builders are the most successful at building passionate teams. They are excellent mentors and coaches who strive to teach and build up their team members.  They want their teams to be a good reflection of themselves and strive to help them learn and grow. Builders understand that people’s passions are engaged when they feel valued, respected, and included.  Climbers are usually the least successful leaders in the long run. They believe in the “sink or swim” approach and are most concerned with doing whatever it takes to achieve their own goals, including harming their own team members in the process. Climbers often motivate their teams through fear.
  8. 8. Are you a Builder or Climber ? Unfortunately, many Climbers think they are Builders. However, a self-assessment will determine whether a person truly is a Builder or a Climber. Those who determine they are Climbers need to be committed to both personal and professional growth, learning, and change if they want to reignite their passion and improve their team building efforts.
  9. 9. The Management of Matrix
  10. 10. The Management of Matrix  In many workplace teams, roles and responsibilities are unclear. People may be productive and may be making positive changes, but they may also be working outside their areas of responsibility. This can pose a problem, particularly if a person moves into a team leadership role without any sense of how he should be contributing to the organization.  There are three basic roles in almost every organization, and if each member of the team understands these roles and where they fall within the matrix, creating passion-driven teams will be possible.  The three roles are:  Leadership  Management  Front-line Employees  All three roles must adhere to a simple formula: raw product + process = outcome. The raw product is the responsibility of the employee. The process is what the employee must do to the raw product. The outcome is the result of taking the raw product through the process.
  11. 11. The Management of Matrix  At the bottom of the matrix is the front-line employee. A front-line employee, such as a kitchen worker, has a raw product of food, utensils, and kitchen equipment.  The process involves preparing and cooking the food. The outcome is that the food that is prepared to the customer’s liking.  The next row of the matrix, the management level, has raw products including front-line employees and the systems used to process the raw product.  The outcome consists of efficient operations. Managers set the tone in which their teams must work. Negative and critical managers do little to improve their teams, whereas encouraging managers who are in tune with their employee’s strengths and weaknesses create passion.  Managers who understand the nuances, capabilities, and limitations of their team members are in a better position to delegate, train, coach, and mentor them.  Good managers also must fully understand the systems and processes of their team members.
  12. 12. The Management of Matrix  The manager’s processes include training their workers and adjusting workflow systems.  Depending on the organization, an adjustment to a workflow system may either be a simple process or a more complex situation that involves jumping through hoops.  Good managers make things better for their teams and ensure that their team members are trained properly and placed in the proper positions.  Team members who are not in the proper positions can hamper the efficiency level of their teams, even if they are doing an adequate job.  Good managers recognize the skills, knowledge, and abilities of their teams and place them where they are most useful.
  13. 13. The Management of Matrix  At the leadership level of the matrix, the raw products include the ideas for where the company should be going, the horizon (trends, predictions, forecasts for the company), and the realistic capabilities of the organization.  The process for leaders includes communicating ideas throughout the organization, listening to feedback, and adjusting the ideas based on feedback, the horizon, and the organization’s capabilities.  The outcome for the leadership level is an effective organization. Just like at the other levels, assessing and adjusting is a crucial step in the process
  14. 14. The Management of Matrix  At the leadership level of the matrix, the raw products include the ideas for where the company should be going, the horizon (trends, predictions, forecasts for the company), and the realistic capabilities of the organization.  The process for leaders includes communicating ideas throughout the organization, listening to feedback, and adjusting the ideas based on feedback, the horizon, and the organization’s capabilities.  The outcome for the leadership level is an effective organization. Just like at the other levels, assessing and adjusting is a crucial step in the process
  15. 15. The idea that people lack motivation is bad psychology. It’s a myth. If we’re going to create passion-driven teams, we need a clear understanding about what drives people to do what they do
  16. 16. The Cause of Micromanagement
  17. 17. Micro Management  The Cause of Micromanagement- A micromanager is someone who dictates every action and every decision for everyone on the team.  Micromanagers are frequently frustrated that team members are not taking things seriously enough.  They want constant status updates, even during normal operations, and they quickly point out errors and mistakes. They are often very busy even when their team members are not, and they frequently take back assigned projects because they feel they can do a better job.  Micromanagement is common when an outstanding front-line employee is promoted to a management position. Oftentimes, front-line employees are internally driven to excel and want to hear that they are doing a good job. They continue doing what they have been praised for in the past to receive an ego boost.  For many, the phrase “good job” is like currency; the more they hear it, they more they feel they are likely to get a raise or a promotion. Therefore, when problems on the line arise, they step in to fix them since that is what worked in the past.
  18. 18. Micro Management  Undertreating the problem is another cause of micromanagement.  Most management training provides very little hands-on experience. Learning the theories about how to manage are not very useful without real world experiences.  Many business degree programs do not even touch on the concepts of training people or adjusting systems as core responsibilities of management.  The third cause of micromanagement is fear. When people are told they are doing a “good job,” they are receiving positive reinforcement. The fear of failure and the subsequent consequences is the extreme opposite, and is a negative motivator.
  19. 19. The Cure for Micromanagement
  20. 20. The Cure for Micromanagement  For organizations to stop micromanagement from are detected, then strategies for improvement can be quickly implemented.  New managers and their supervisors should work together to determine the best methods of training, mentoring, and coaching for addressing any problems. Routine conversations should include positive reinforcements along with addressing any inefficiencies.  Mentors should ensure that they are not overly critical all the time, are not too busy to meet, do not force new managers to compromise their values, and do not allow managers to become too dependent on them.
  21. 21. The Cure for Micromanagement  If new managers find themselves in an organization that does not provide help for micromanaging, a self-cure is possible.  People in this position should remember that their role as a manager requires a totally new level of thinking and that their responsibilities are now to train team members and monitor system efficiencies.  If clear-cut job responsibilities are not available, they should be persistent in getting clarification.  Constant self-analysis is important and hiring an outside coach for help is something that should also be considered.
  22. 22. Becoming an Expert about the People You Manage
  23. 23. Emotional Intelligence  Emotional Intelligence Quotient (EQ) is an ability to perceive and assess the emotions, tendencies, and desires of one’s self and others, and then to use those perceptions to choose a course of action that will achieve the best possible results. Studies show that people with higher EQ scores are more likely to be top performers.  Some studies even suggest high EQ scores can result in increases in productivity and profitability of more than 100 percent. Managers should strive to increase their EQ as a way to improve their own results.  Assessments are a good way to gain better understanding of the members of the team. Three of the more common assessments are:  Myers-Briggs, which tests different ways people think.  DISC assessments, which test behavioral tendencies.  Workplace Motivators, which tests individual motivators.
  24. 24. The Myths of Motivation  Lack of motivation is a myth.  Everyone has motives for everything they do. A manager’s job is to create conditions in which people’s natural motivations move them forward as the mere presence of obstacles can hold people back.  For many people, fear is the most oppressive obstacle of all. Managers need to first identify the obstacles holding their team members back, and then help remove them. The five most common fears are of:  Criticism  Rejection  Failure  Not getting what is desired  Losing what is already there.  Managers can focus on the positive in order to manage these fears. When an employee fears criticism, the manager can take a mistake and turn it into a teaching experience. If someone on the team fails at a task, the manager should reiterate that he still has faith in the team member
  25. 25. The Myths of Motivation  When presented with new ideas, the manager should not be too quick in rejecting them without positive reinforcement. A manager can implement incentives that overcome the fear of not getting what he wants. The hope of a gain elsewhere can offset a fear of a loss.  Managers often make the mistake of thinking they are motivating employees, when in fact they are really manipulating them. This can be avoided by focusing on the employees’ internal motivations rather than the manager’s expectations of what should motivate them.  To bring out people’s passions, managers should learn what motivates them from within. Managers should also provide a safe environment where employees can engage and feel valued.  This type of environment can help managers adopt a win/win attitude whereby they seriously consider the team’s wants and needs and not just assume they know what these wants and needs are.
  26. 26. To truly “motivate” someone (using the colloquial term), we must create conditions in which employees engage for reasons that are important to them.
  27. 27. The Power of Water Cooler conversations
  28. 28. The Power Water Cooler Conversations  People like to feel connected to one another and to know what is going on around them.  Casual conversations with team members about everything from projects that are in process, the company’s vision for the future, and the team’s role in the company go a long way in producing passion-driven teams.  When employees understand the company’s goals and how their own work contributes to the achievement of those goals, they are more likely to be productive and profitable members of the team.  The brain is hardwired to resist change. Understanding how the brain works can give the manager insights into how to get people to modify habits and move in a common direction. Informal water cooler conversations can help teams achieve top performance.
  29. 29. The Power Water Cooler Conversations  Managers need to use these conversations to improve employees’ focus, expectations, and attention density.  To improve focus, managers should paint a positive picture of the future. When dealing with an employee’s expectations, managers should help the employee gain a different perspective and understand that it is okay to be open to new possibilities.  With attention density, it is a known fact that most people retain information better if it is learned slowly over time.  Thus, regular water cooler conversations can slowly reinforce new ideas.
  30. 30. The Do’s & Don'ts of Delegating  Delegating work has many levels. When managers delegate, they transfer responsibility, authority, and accountability. Without transferring all three, the manager fails to maximize personal ownership of the tasks.  Managers should know the preferences and limitations of each of their team members. They should understand their communication styles, problem solving abilities, and ability to deal with pressure before they are ready to start delegating.  It is important that managers fully understand the big picture so that they can carefully match up the work to the right person. Once complete, a face-to-face explanation of the project is in order, as is an agreement on what constitutes a finished product. A timely follow-up is extremely important as well.
  31. 31. The Do’s & Don'ts of Delegating  To transfer ownership of a large project for the first time, managers can request that their employees spend time creating a general outline of the project in their own terms.  It does not have to be complete, but it should demonstrate a general understanding of what must be done.  Managers can go over the plan, fill in any blanks, or correct any mistakes before completely turning over the project.  Once the outline is 85-90 percent where the manager thinks it should be, the project can be turned over and follow-ups can be scheduled.  A survey of well-respected delegators revealed a few consistent ideas about delegating. They felt that managers should delegate tasks that are possible to complete, build trust, give the big picture, take their hands off the project, and give credit where credit is due.
  32. 32. Maintaining a Balanced Diet of Meetings
  33. 33. Maintaining a Balanced Diet of Meetings  Team leaders must schedule the right amount of meetings in order to move their teams forward without weighing them down. Meetings are meant to keep a team healthy and growing, to keep people on track with company goals, and to help the team increase efficiencies and effectiveness.  There are a few rules managers must consider when planning meetings:  Team leaders must decide what type of meeting must take place: informational, problem-solving, planning, or retreats/team building.  Team leaders should make sure that there is a clearly stated purpose for the meeting, as well as defined goals.  There should be a written agenda, and everyone who needs to present should know about it ahead of time.  If status meetings are common in an organization, they should be minimized.
  34. 34. Maintaining a Balanced Diet of Meetings  Leaders should encourage team members to use tools, such as email, wikis, and even old-fashioned bulletin boards, to communicate about the status of a project as much as possible.  When a decision-making meeting is scheduled, the team leader should distribute information ahead of time to speed up the process. It should be made clear to participants that being prepared is mandatory.  To determine the value of their meetings, team leaders should regularly collect feedback from team members.  After three to twelve months of data collection, they should meet with the team and determine the consensus on the value, purpose, frequency, and length of meetings. They can then adjust the schedules as necessary
  35. 35. Each team is unique. A meeting that provides great benefit to one team may be poisonous to another. You must be in tune with your team’s unique needs.
  36. 36. Listen, or This Won’t Work
  37. 37. Listen, or This Won’t Work  Poor listening skills can cost companies millions of dollars. Team leaders must understand that when people do not feel heard, it leads to feelings of frustration and isolation, as well as to a loss of team cohesion and lower levels of commitment.  Hearing is different from listening. Hearing is passive; listening requires an active, conscious choice and is a learned skill.  Obstacles to listening include filtering, second-guessing, discounting, relating, rehearsing, forecasting, and placating.  Team leaders must strive to avoid these obstacles in order to truly understand their team members. Understanding leads to trust. Without trust, there cannot be passion-driven teams.
  38. 38. Listen, or This Won’t Work  The Center for Workplace Excellence conducted a survey that noted the top five reasons people found it difficult to listen.  These reasons include:  When people drag on and on  When they are irritated with the person speaking  When they have already made up their minds about the issue  When they are distracted  When they are not interested in the topic at hand.
  39. 39. Listening requires an active, conscious choice. To listen, you must have a purpose in your heart and apply mental effort. Think of listening as a goal—an objective. A task you must accomplish.
  40. 40. Resolve to Resolve All Conflict
  41. 41. Resolve to Resolve All Conflict  Disagreements, or differences in opinion, are normal and common.  However, if they are not dealt with properly, they can lead to tension and conflict. In healthy conflict, parties who are in disagreement can state their opinions and know that the other parties are truly listening.  Tension from unspoken conflict obstructs problem solving, which is essential in a passion-driven team.  When tensions are high, conflicts are unresolved, and people do not feel understood, team leaders should use a tool called the Relationship Ladder.
  42. 42. Resolve to Resolve All Conflict  There are five steps to the Relationship Ladder: 1. Focus on the other person. 2. Seek confirmation on what is understood. 3. Look for trust. 4. Discover the truth. 5. Establish hope.  The Relationship Ladder requires practice to work properly, but is an excellent way to resolve conflict.  It helps people understand others’ views, shows them how to demonstrate care, gives them a systematic approach for resolving conflict, helps them remain objective, and allows them to problem-solve.
  43. 43. Poor Training: A Leading Cause of Trouble
  44. 44. Poor Training – Leading Cause of Troubles  A study revealed that there is a 240 percent higher chance of an employee quitting a job with inadequate training programs than an employee quitting a job that has well-respected training programs in place.  Employee turnover is very costly to employers. Replacing an employee who makes over $60,000 a year will cost a company more than $38,000 in the long run.  The average cost of training is $2,000 per employee, per year. Even if that is doubled, it is much less costly than the cost of employee turnover that occurs when training is not offered. There are intangible benefits to additional training as well. Well- trained staff are more productive, efficient, and generally happier.
  45. 45. Poor Training – Leading Cause of Troubles  A four-step method works very well when training front-line employees:  “Instructor does, instructor explains.”  “Instructor does, student explains.”  “Student does, instructor explains.”  “Student does, student explains, instructor evaluates.”  When designing training programs, team leaders & managers should analyze the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of their trainees. In the design phase, they should take that analysis and create learning objectives that address the issues.  In the development stage, the instructor determines how best to present the training. The implementation step is next, and this is where the instructor actually conducts the training.  Last but not least, the instructor should evaluate whether or not objectives were met and materials were used correctly.
  46. 46. Celebrate Failure & Achievement
  47. 47. Celebrate Failure & Achievement  All successful people have failed at some point in their lives. Failure, or lack of success, is a learning experience.  To create a passion-driven team, team leaders must teach their team members to move forward and learn from their mistakes.  While many companies say that employees are their greatest assets, they do not always treat them as such.  Employee recognition programs do not have to cost much, but they can really boost employee morale.  Management should provide a nurturing and encouraging environment to keep employees protected and help them feel celebrated.
  48. 48. ... · . - ..: . · . . ,.. - . _, . - • - , . . .,.. ... ' _ _ .,.a ." I" ......••. . -. .-,- , - · . • " " . -· . - - . ... .: .1 ..'" • """C: ....... .. .- •. .. . - - - - · . . - ..., . . .. , . -- - . - · - - '"" " - . -.- .. ---. · . .. .. .. . - .. ·- ...._. . """' - - "' . :t • • ·- . - . - - -'· ..1 1 ._,.. ...... - - " " " ' -• . . . . -.---_,..,- -4 • • - • - • • . ...... •- - "."' " " -· . .. .. ·-, ..J5-'':' ' .... . - oa! llf' ' - 6 ., . . . ... ..l
  49. 49. Learning’s for Application  Teams who are motivated by passion can accomplish great things.  Managers cannot manufacture fervent enthusiasm. They must create a trusting, sharing and committed environment – the perfect conditions for a passionate work spirit.  Managers are either selfless “Builders” or selfish “Climbers.” Only builders can develop zealous teams.  To build an ardent team, learn what motivates the team members.  Study your employees to see what makes them tick. Understand your employees’ knowledge, skills, attitudes and processes.  Micromanagement will kill any enjoyment team members obtain from their work.  Often, organizations are responsible for the evolution of micromanagers since they don’t teach people how to manage properly.  To prevent a culture of micromanagement, coach and mentor new managers thoroughly and perform personality tests to discover each manager’s style.  Teams often lack zest due to fear of criticism, rejection or failure.  Learn to listen actively to your staffers. This reduces conflict and boosts passion.
  50. 50. Mail your comments to ramaddster&gmail.com
  • salmansubakat

    Feb. 21, 2021

Can passion be taught? Can it be fostered? The answer is yes. But perhaps more accurately, a team leader must create the right conditions for passion to emerge. Those conditions must be nurtured, not unlike a gardener creating the right conditions for his plants to flourish. Make your job easier. Get the inside scoop on the secrets of success that motivate teams to top performance. In the matrix of workplace roles and responsibilities, managers are pivotal to corporate success. Yet a manager is often the unsung hero who must adapt to demands from all sides—and do so with little or no training, and without mentorship for the role. Learn from Dan Bobinski, who draws from 20 years of consulting experience, extensive studies of best practices, and the latest in neuroscience research. You'll learn the principles and methods top managers use to develop passionate, engaged employees who are dedicated to success. You'll be able to: — Motivate without manipulating — Turn mistakes into a fervent drive for quality — Equip teams to enthusiastically adapt to change — Create environments in which people strive for excellence—and more Today's workforce requires managers to be more than just a person in charge. Creating Passion-Driven Teams show you how to tap your team's natural motivations and achieve consistent, sustained top performance.

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