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Kaizen Innovation in Manufacturing

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The Training is a 1 day course covering impartation knowledge of Kaizen and its associated Tools and; -application of Lean concepts to lead Kaizen Workshop/s with Innovation Projects for Change in a World Class Manufacturing Environment.
This training aims to impart a systematic review on all the critical aspects of Lean use to; lead Kaizen workshop and presentation using Standardize Kaizen form and methodology with;
Innovation to be competitive in the Global Business Environment.
COURSE CONTENT
Kaizen, its definition and Principles
Kaizen definition, Innovation Definition
Kaizen vs Innovation
Characteristics of a Lean Factory
Cellular Factory Layout
Multi-skilled Operators
6S and Visual Control
Kanban and Supermarkets
Rapid Changeover
Total Quality Approach
Right-sized, flexible equipment
Water Strider
Moving Production Lines
Total Productive Maintenance
Continuous Improvement
The 3 Pillars of Kaizen
1. 6S (5+1S) Housekeeping
2. Waste Elimination
- Types of Waste CLOSEDMITT
- Valued-added vs Non-value
added
3. Standard Operation
Three factors that accounts the 3 Pillars Activities.
1. Visual management,
2. The role of the supervisor,
3. Importance of training and
creating a learning
organization.
Innovation & Workshop Projects
Types of Innovation in Kaizen. Why Innovation?
Degree of Innovation-the act of creating new products,
processes, ideas, etc...
Examples of Types of Innovation
Innovating Process using Typical Kaizen concepts (Lean
methods)
Phase 1: Pre-Planning for Innovation
Phase 2: Execution - Innovation Week
Role of Leader, Facilitator, Participant in Innovation
Projects
Innovation Projects Implementation using Kaizen Forms for:
Daily and Weekly Report Outs
Follow-up for further Innovation
 



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Kaizen Innovation in Manufacturing

  1. 1. DELL, Penang 27 Jun 2016 Kaizen & Innovation in Manufacturing Dell Asia Pacific Sdn. Bhd. Plot 76, Kawasan Perusahaan Bukit Tengah, 14000, Bukit Mertajam, Pulau Pinang, Malaysia. Tel 04-508 7119
  2. 2.  International Educational Leadership Speaker. Provides consultation on Lean and leads Kaizen, TPM, Cellular system & Moonshine set up.  A multi skill Innovator with Mechanical background that adopts Green Living and rode 18,290km thru 24 Countries over 5 months from Penang to London on a 125 CC Kapcai.  Founder of Tim’s Waterfuel, an alternative HHO gas supplement using Water that adds power, millage & reduce Co2 emission on automobiles.  An NGO Community worker for Prison, Drug Rehabilitation and Crisis Relieve & Training (CREST) Malaysia, an organization that respond to Crisis & Flood. Timothy Wooi Add: 20C, Taman Bahagia, 06000, Jitra, Kedah timothywooi2@gmail.com Certified HRDF Trainer & Principal Consultant for Lean Management and a Kaizen Specialist with 30 over years working experience. TRAINER’S PROFILE
  3. 3. Kaizen & Innovation in Manufacturing Kaizen & Innovation in Manufacturing
  4. 4. DESCRIPTION: The Training is a 1 day course covering impartation knowledge of Kaizen and its associated Tools and; -application of Lean concepts to lead Kaizen Workshop/s with Innovation Projects for Change in a World Class Manufacturing Environment. Kaizen & Innovation in Manufacturing
  5. 5. Gradual, unending improvement, doing “little things” better every day, setting and achieving ever higher standards Kai Zen (Continuous Improvement in Japanese) -business philosophy or system based on making positive changes to improve efficiency that focuses on continuous improvement. Although kaizen was first used to increase the efficiency of manufacturing processes, it isn’t limited to that application. Kaizen & Innovation in Manufacturing
  6. 6. COURSE OBJECTIVES This training aims to impart a systematic review on all the critical aspects of Lean use to;  lead Kaizen workshop and presentation using Standardize Kaizen form and methodology with;  Innovation to be competitive in the Global Business Environment Kaizen & Innovation in Manufacturing
  7. 7. COURSE CONTENT Kaizen, its definition and Principles Kaizen definition, Innovation Definition Kaizen vs Innovation Characteristics of a Lean Factory Cellular Factory Layout Multi-skilled Operators 6S and Visual Control Kanban and Supermarkets Rapid Changeover Total Quality Approach Right-sized, flexible equipment Water Strider Moving Production Lines Total Productive Maintenance Continuous Improvement The 3 Pillars of Kaizen  1. 6S (5+1S) Housekeeping  2. Waste Elimination - Types of Waste CLOSEDMITT - Valued-added vs Non-value added  3. Standard Operation Three factors that accounts the 3 Pillars Activities.  1. Visual management,  2. The role of the supervisor,  3. Importance of training and creating a learning organization. Kaizen & Innovation in Manufacturing
  8. 8. COURSE CONTENT (Continue noon) Innovation & Workshop Projects Types of Innovation in Kaizen. Why Innovation? Degree of Innovation-the act of creating new products, processes, ideas, etc... Examples of Types of Innovation Innovating Process using Typical Kaizen concepts (Lean methods) Phase 1: Pre-Planning for Innovation Phase 2: Execution - Innovation Week Role of Leader, Facilitator, Participant in Innovation Projects  Innovation Projects Implementation using Kaizen Forms for: Daily and Weekly Report Outs Follow-up for further Innovation Kaizen & Innovation in Manufacturing
  9. 9. Impact on You!! First Time Quality • Standardized Work • Error Proofing • Root Cause Analysis – Problem Solving • Change Request Forms • Predictable Processes – Machine Reliability – Total Productive Maintenance – Improved up-time • Reduced scrap & repairs People • Skilled, multi-function workers – Training – Employee development • Small Group Activity – Quality – Safety – Productivity – Cost • Structured feedback meetings • Empowerment – Involvement – Accountability – Responsibility – Authority • Safety & Ergonomics Just in Time • Kanban production • Min / Max levels • Smaller Lots • Quick Change Over • Less inventory • Less reliance on schedules Kaizen & Innovation in Manufacturing
  10. 10. The cumulative effect of these many ‘small changes’ over time can be quite significant, especially if all of the employees within a company and its leaders are committed to kaizen.. Kaizen, Focused Improvement Kaizen, its definition and Principles
  11. 11. Kaizen, its definition and Principles -where employees are encouraged to make ‘small changes’ in their work area on an ongoing basis. Kaizen - A CONCEPT & TOOL FOR EMPLOYEES INVOLVEMENT - a Japanese system of incremental Innovation;
  12. 12. Kaizen, its definition and Principles
  13. 13. Kaizen, its definition and Principles
  14. 14. Typical Kaizen concepts uses (Lean methods) to innovate processes. The concept is equally applicable to many types of organizational functions, such as accounting, engineering and customer service, and to improving the efficiency of business models and supply chains, which extend beyond the company. Kaizen, its definition and Principles
  15. 15.  Employees are the problem  Doing my job  Understanding my job  Measuring individuals  Change the person  Correct errors  Who made the error? The process is the problem Helping to get things done Knowing how my job fits in the process Measuring performance Change the process Reduce variation What allowed the error to occur? Improvements through kaizen: a process focus. The starting point of a process-emphasis approach is to map the process in order to understand the flow of the product or service. Conventional approach Process-emphasis approach Kaizen & Innovation in Manufacturing
  16. 16. Innovation - a fundamentally different way of doing things with better, and perhaps different outcomes. However many innovations are merely improvements on things already exists. Its important to create a culture of innovation within your organization, - supporting productive failure. -helps your organization become - successful in identifying new ideas, implementing and integrating them into operations. You must engrain this cycle into the DNA of your organization. Kaizen & Innovation in Manufacturing
  17. 17. • Innovation means first different, then better. It is a fundamentally different way of doing things with better, and perhaps different, outcomes. Innovation Kaizen & Innovation in Manufacturing Both the 'different' and the 'better' must be significant and substantial.
  18. 18. Successful innovation is the use of new technological knowledge, market knowledge, and business models, that can deliver a new product or service, or product/service combinations, to customers who will purchase at prices that will provide profits. Kaizen & Innovation in Manufacturing
  19. 19. Examples of Innovation in Computers
  20. 20. Examples of Innovation in Computers
  21. 21. Kaizen is gradual & Innovation is more radical, both are continuous Improvement. And how it can be applied to workshop project settings, where teams of people may only be working together for the duration of a project. Kaizen vs Innovation Kaizen & Innovation in Manufacturing
  22. 22. ‘‘Doing things radically differently rather than just doing them well, are just triumphs of execution not Innovation’’ (Washor's piece for The Huffington Post, published in Oct, 2009) Innovation vs Execution Most people think innovation is all about ideas, when in fact it is more about delivery, people, and process. Innovation is execution of ideas that produces outcomes that are different and better than before. Kaizen & Innovation in Manufacturing
  23. 23. Characteristics of a World Class Manufacturers Delivery CostQuality Customer-Value Focused Lean Production System L e v e l P r o d u c t i o n JIT JIDOKA 5S / V i s u a l M a n a g e m e n t Relentless R e m o v a l o f W a s t e LEAN PRODUCTION SYSTEM Mechanic Material Machine Standard Work Takt Time SWIP Operational Availability 1 piece Flow Pull system Kaizen Methodology Shop Floor Kaizen Equip and Facility Kaizen System Kaizen Progression Radical Change – Kaikaku Kaizen Workshops Daily Improvements – Standard Work People Based System Cost + Profit = Price Price – Profit = Target Cost Kaizen & Innovation in Manufacturing
  24. 24. Just-in-time (JIT) Inventory systems using Standard Work In Progress (SWIP) and Lean Staffing with minimize Production buffers Rapid machine setups & changeover to permit small production runs by reducing times. Single Minute Exchange Die (SMED). Use of team work on the production line Extensive training to develop multi skilled workers Job rotation to facilitate on-the-job learning of multiple tasks and skills Off-line problem solving or quality circle groups that involve employees in continuous improvement activities Characteristics of a Lean Factory Following are characteristics of lean manufacturing systems:
  25. 25. Tools and practices commonly associated with the Lean Production System include: Cellular Factory Layout Multi-skilled Operators 6s and Visual Control Andon Lights Kanban and Supermarkets Rapid Changeover Right-sized, flexible Equipment Total Quality Approach Water Striders Moving Production Lines Total Preventive Maintenance Continuous Improvement More…… Characteristics of a Lean Factory
  26. 26. Cellular Factory Layout Cellular Layout Concepts: Product or Customer Focused Womb-to-Tomb production Co-located support staff Standing workers U-shaped layout Teamwork and ownership Characteristics of a Lean Factory
  27. 27. Multi-skilled Workers A workforce that is cross trained to perform multiple tasks in a lean factory. Multi-skilled operators have a wider span of control and greater job satisfaction Multi-skilled operators can be moved from position to position to facilitate a continuous flow of products.  Operators in a Lean Factory are provided the tools and training to inspect their own products and are responsible continuous improvement. Characteristics of a Lean Factory
  28. 28. ACM Kaizen Leader Certification Course 28 Characteristics of a Lean Factory 6S’ 5S’+Safety Program (details on 3 Pillars of Kaizen)
  29. 29. Visual Controls Visual controls are a component of the 5S process. Visual controls allow us to tell at a glance how we are doing. Using visual controls helps Identify abnormal conditions immediately Display standards and reliable methods Prompt action and communication Visual Controls are Lean Tools, used to communicate the status of a production area in 5 minutes or less by simple observation without use of computers or speaking to anyone.” Characteristics of a Lean Factory
  30. 30. Andon Lights Andons call attention to abnormalities. Response must be immediate to be effective Must have a clearly defined escalation of response The operator turns on the light. The designated respondant turns off the light. Andon Lights are a common visual control used in a lean factory. The Andon signals a problem or Request for help Characteristics of a Lean Factory
  31. 31. Kanban and Supermarkets PRODUCTION KANBANPRODUCTION KANBAN Part NumberPart Number 69B08170-6969B08170-69 Core DetailCore Detail DescriptionDescription QuantityQuantity 11 Card 2 of 4Card 2 of 4 Made by:Made by: Core CellCore Cell Deliver to;Deliver to; SupermarketSupermarket Authorized by:Authorized by: JCCJCC Functions of KanbanFunctions of Kanban Prevents over-production.Prevents over-production. Maintains inventory control.Maintains inventory control. Serves as an authorizationServes as an authorization to build.to build. KANBAN simply means signal. A visual signal that triggers Production movement of parts or material. It is a primary tool for implementing Pull Production. It’s the “pull” signal from the customer Characteristics of a Lean Factory
  32. 32. Kanban and Supermarkets Supermarkets are…Supermarkets are… Kanban controlled inventoryKanban controlled inventory between processes.between processes. Created between processes toCreated between processes to makemake SWIPSWIP levels visual. (kanban ≠ zero stock) Designed to allow for First-In- First-Out (FIFO) method. Characteristics of a Lean Factory The customer process pulls components from theThe customer process pulls components from the supermarket and leaves a Kanban card authorizingsupermarket and leaves a Kanban card authorizing the supplier to build replacements items.the supplier to build replacements items.
  33. 33. Rapid Changeover Large batch runs cause other products to wait in queue resulting in more inventory and reduces ability to respond to changes in customer demand. How can we reduce change-over time between products? Setup Reduction: Quick-Release Die Exchange Before After Large Batch runs to maximize capacity because change-over for a new product takes a long time and is costly. Traditional Thinking: Lean Thinking: Characteristics of a Lean Factory
  34. 34. Rapid Changeover Lean Factories Focus on Setup reduction to:  Increase available machine capacity.  Reduce batch sizes to minimize inventory and lead time.  Provide Flexibility to produce a greater variety of products. Setup Reduction: Quick-Release Die Exchange Before After Characteristics of a Lean Factory
  35. 35. Total Quality Approach ““Stop the Line”Stop the Line” AuthorityAuthority Jidoka -Jidoka - AutonomationAutonomation Poka Yoke –Poka Yoke – Mistake ProofingMistake Proofing Quality CirclesQuality Circles Characteristics of a Lean Factory
  36. 36. Right Sized, Flexible Equipment $100,000 Cycles every 1.2 seconds $1,500 Cycles every 60 seconds Takt time = 75 sec Characteristics of a Lean Factory
  37. 37. Water Strider Improve Operator Performance by eliminating their walking, searching and sorting Eliminates Operator’s non-repetitive tasks so that standard work may be established Purpose of a Water Strider: A Water Strider is a worker who collects and delivers parts in kits or sets to multiple processes on a just-in-time basis. Characteristics of a Lean Factory
  38. 38. Moving Production Lines Timing Mark Baton-pass zone Benefits of Moving Production Line Provides a Pace-setter for takt-time production. Is a tool to expose waste and eliminate problems. Adds value to movement of product. Characteristics of a Lean Factory
  39. 39. Total Productive Maintenance Quality Maintenance Achieving and sustaining quality by maintaining equipment and processes New assets meet production needs Early Equipment Design and Start up Management Attack Six Big Losses Focus on continuous reduction of production losses Planned Maintenance Moving from reactive to proactive maintenance Autonomous Maintenance Operator assumes ownership for the efficiency of their asset(s) TPM Training and Education The Key to Lean Manufacturing is reliable, waste- free processes and equipment. Characteristics of a Lean Factory
  40. 40. Continuous Improvement Kaizen Methodology Shop Floor Kaizen Equipment and Facility Kaizen System Kaizen Progression Radical Change – Kaikaku Kaizen Workshops Daily Improvements – Standard Work People Based System Characteristics of a Lean Factory
  41. 41. The 3 Pillars of Kaizen 1. Visual management, 2. The role of the supervisor, 3. Importance of training and creating a learning organization. 6S’(5S’+ Safety) The management and employees must work together to fulfill the requirements for each category with 3 Factors: (Standard Operation)
  42. 42. The 6S’ methodology is a simple and universal approach that works in companies all over the world. The 3 Pillars of Kaizen It is essentially a support to Lean Manufacturing improvements as just-in-time (JIT) production, cellular manufacturing, total quality management (TQM) or six sigma initiatives, and also is a great contributor to making the workplace a safer and better place to spend time. 1st Pillar: 6S’ (5S’ Housekeeping + Safety)
  43. 43. Many manufacturing facilities have opted to follow the path towards a “6S” workplace organizational housekeeping with Safety as part of continuous improvement or Lean Manufacturing processes. 5S Represents 5 Japanese terminologies 1.Sort, 2. Set in order, 3. Shine, 4. Standardize and 5. Sustain It is also sometimes known as the five pillars of a visual workplace. 1st Pillar: 6S’ (5S’+Safety)
  44. 44. 1.1.SeiriSeiri –– SortSort 2.2.SeitonSeiton –– SimplifySimplify 3.3.SeisoSeiso –– SweepSweep 4.4.SeiketsuSeiketsu –– StandardiseStandardise 5.5.ShitsukeShitsuke –– Self disciplineSelf discipline 6.6. SafetySafety A process of managing the work place ,known as ‘’Gemba’’ (real workplace ) in Japanese, for improvement purposes where value is added to the products or services before passing them to next process. 1st Pillar: 6S’ (5S’+Safety)
  45. 45. 3rd Class Workplace … Necessary & Unnecessary items are mixed together in the same workplace
  46. 46. 2nd Class Workplace … Necessary & Unnecessary items had been separated within identified work area (including inventory)
  47. 47. 1st Class Workplace … Only Necessary supplies, tools and items are stored in the Work Environment.
  48. 48. Why Do 5s? QCDSM Productivity Improvement Safety Practices Flexibility (Short Load Time) One-piece flow Quick setup Equipment REliability (TPM) Trained & Motivated Work Force Multi Processes handler Quality Assurance Process Control Mistake- Proofing 5S 1st Pillar: 6S’ (5S’+Safety)
  49. 49. 5S+Safety is the basis for Continuous Productivity & Quality Improvement being the foundation for Lean Production System L e v e l P r o d u c t i o n JIT JIDOKA 5S+Safety LEAN PRODUCTION SYSTEM Mechanic Material Machine Standard Work Takt Time SWIP Operational Availability 1 piece Flow Pull system 1st Pillar: 6S’ (5S’+Safety)
  50. 50. Seiri (Sort) • To take out unnecessary items either sort , red tag or even discard them if not used anymore. Necessary: Used for daily work Used periodically I am the source Unnecessary: Unsafe Defective Obsolete or outdated Unused Extra or duplicate The 3 Pillars of Kaizen
  51. 51. 1st Pillar: 6S’ (5S’+Safety)
  52. 52. Seiton (Simplify) • To arrange necessary items in a proper order so that they can be easily picked up for use Consider: • Visual aids are encouraged in order to help understanding and minimize complexity. • Labeling locations where necessary items are kept when not in use, especially moveable items. • Labeling drawers and notebooks to identify their contents. 1st Pillar: 6S’ (5S’+Safety)
  53. 53. "Anyone should be able to easily understand proper"Anyone should be able to easily understand proper arrangement and abnormalities."arrangement and abnormalities." 5s Map to decide location Label & shadow board 1st Pillar: 6S’ (5S’+Safety)
  54. 54. Seiso (Sweep) • To clean your workplace completely so that there is no dust anywhere 1st Pillar: 6S’ (5S’+Safety)
  55. 55. Seiketsu (Standardize) • To maintain a high standard of housekeeping and workplace organization at all times • Visual checks to maintain the process 1st Pillar: 6S’ (5S’+Safety)
  56. 56. Shitsuke (Self-discipline) • To train people to follow good housekeeping discipline independently Self Discipline to follow 5S’ reduce waste and optimize productivity through maintaining an orderly workplace and using visual cues to achieve more consistent operational results. 1st Pillar: 6S’ (5S’+Safety)
  57. 57. Safety, the honorary 6th S An organized and safe workplace is established towards a ‘Hazard free’ work environment with the smallest amount of lost time due to accidents. 1st Pillar: 6S’ (5S’+Safety) Safety programs are mandatory, implemented by teams working together to identify and remove potential hazards within workplace. The five in a 5S workplace organizational and housekeeping methodology refers to five steps. Safety should be the honorary sixth “S.”
  58. 58. 1st Pillar: 6S’ (5S’+Safety)
  59. 59. Benefit of 5S’ with Safety • 5S’ makes one’s workplace more pleasant and safe to work • 5S’ helps in work efficiency • 5S’ and Safety must go hand-in-hand • 5S’ leads to better quality products and higher productivity The 3 Pillars of Kaizen
  60. 60. Red Tag Sticker Used to identify; – Broken tooling and fixtures – Unnecessary equipment, fixtures and materials Simple double sided label to attach to unnecessary items; red so as highly visible. – Side 1; simple identification of item – Side 2; disposition of item 1st Pillar: 6S’ (5S’+Safety)
  61. 61. 5S’ Red TagRed Tags- used to keep the process of change going throughout the 5S’ program while remaining organized in the process. Red Tags are used for visual management of a workspace, clearly marking items that need to be moved creating workplace organization. Red Tag Sample 1st Pillar: 6S’ (5S’+Safety) It identifies – Broken tooling, fixtures, unnecessary equipment and materials
  62. 62. 1st Pillar: 6S’ (5S’+Safety)
  63. 63. 5S’ Level (Check this out)Sorting Necessary and unnecessary items are mixed together in the work area Simplifying Tools, supplies and materials are randomly located Sweeping factory or office equipment is in poor repair. The work area is disorganized, unsafe and inefficient Standardizing Work area and processes are not documented and work is completed as individuals not teams Self-Discipline minimal attention is spent on the work environment in organization, cleanliness and neatness. There is no 5S awareness Sorting Necessary and unnecessary items have been separated within the identified work area (including excess inventory) Simplifying A designated location has been established and agreed to for items found necessary from sorting Sweeping Physical and visual sweeping is being implemented to maintain and improve work area organization, cleanliness and neatness Standardizing Sorting, simplifying, and sweeping documentation has begun and is readily available and visible to area users Self-Discipline Area users understand the basic 5S principles and are attempting to follow and implement 5S. Teamwork has begun. Sorting Only necessary supplies, tools and equipments are stored in the work environment Simplifying Visual controls are in place to keep the necessary organized. Work processes are being simplified for competently skilled employees Sweeping Work/break areas are physically and visually cleaned and inspected on a regular basis to ensure area safety, equipment functionality, supplies and work place organization is in a ready to use state Standardizing The work environment is standardized to an organizational level. Sorting, simplifying and sweeping activities have been documented and are visual and easily understood. Work processes are discussed, standard work is being implemented and improved upon. Self-Discipline All 5S agreements and practices are part of daily management. Area users clearly keep the work environment neat & organized. Teamwork is evident. Sorting A dependable, documented method has been established to maintain the work area free of unnecessary items and stocked with what is necessary. Shop environments have established Lean Manufacturing Technology. Simplifying A dependable, documented method has been established to maintain a visual control of all necessary items and processes Sweeping A dependable, documented method has been established for area users to follow, fix and review work, tools, equipment and the environment. Standardizing Work processes and work environments have been documented for peak efficiency. Improvements are shared with others as they occur. Self-Discipline The area users understand and follow all 5S documentation. The team is striving to improve the work environment and processes. Sorting Employees continually review the work environment to seek and improve what is necessary or unnecessary Simplifying Employees continually review the work environment to seek and improve visual understanding and simplifying of processes Sweeping Employees continually review the work environment to seek and improve ways to prevent cleaning and maintenance Standardizing Employees continually review the work environment to seek and improve workplace organization and standard work processes Self-Discipline All 5S practices are followed by 100% of area users. All area users understand and continually seek to update and improve upon all 5S activities. Teaming is an inherent part of the work culture. Level5Level1Level2Level3Level4 1st Pillar: 6S’ (5S’+Safety)
  64. 64. Muda in Japanese means Waste. The resources at each process — people and machines — either add value or do not add value and therefore ,any non-value adding activity is classified as Muda in Japan. The 3 Pillars of Kaizen In Kaizen philosophy, the aim is to eliminate the seven 7 deadly wastes caused by Waiting, Defect, Motion, Over processing, Overproduction, Transportation, and Inventory. The 8 Waste is Unused Creativity (Talent)
  65. 65. WASTE Elimination - MUDA 11 Types of Waste – CLOSEDMITTS  Worst type of Waste  Valued-added vs Non- value added Toyota Production System (TPS) differs from traditional approaches to improve productivity through adding resources and illustrates the impact of waste elimination on production lead-time. Lean Manufacturing focus on Elimination of Waste instead of improving Value Added Activities. 2nd Pillar: WASTE Elimination - MUDA
  66. 66. Complexity Find simple solutions in place of complex ones; complex solutions tend to produce more waste and are harder for people to manage. Eliminate needless collection of information. Labor Eliminate all unnecessary “movement” and steps by people and other un-necessary non-valued added activities. Over-production Produce only the exact amount of goods the customer wants when the customer wants it. Eliminate any production beyond customer demand. Space Improve poor arrangement of machines, people, conveyors or workstations, and storage of excess raw materials, parts, work-in-process, finished goods and inventories. Energy Operate equipment and use person-power only for productive purposes; avoid false scale efficiencies, excess power utilization, and unproductive operations. Defects Strive to achieve the goal of no rework (no mistakes, rework, or defects.) Materials Convert all materials into products. Avoid scrap, trim, excess or bad raw materials. Idle Materials Make sure that nothing sits so there is a steady flow to the customer. Any kind of idle inventory represents waste, including raw materials in any form, information, WIP inventories, and finished goods. Time Eliminate delays, long set-ups, and unplanned downtime of machines, processes, or people.These often result from poor specifications, missing parts or information, late deliveries, and inadequate training. Transportation Eliminate the movement of materials or information that does not add value to the product, such as double and triple handling of goods. Safety Hazards Eliminate any unsafe conditions which might cause harm to any personnel in the area or machine down-time; such downtime affects the entire production cycle. 11 Types of Waste- CLOSEDMITTS 2nd Pillar: WASTE Elimination - MUDA
  67. 67. Worst Type of Waste? Over-Production Results in greater cost and delays that reduce profitability Hidden problems production imbalance late supplier deliveries defects downtime long setups Delay/long lead time Capital Resources tied up Storage Cost Wasted Space Transport & handling Deterioration or damage in storage and handling people equipment energy Inventory 2nd Pillar: WASTE Elimination - MUDA
  68. 68. Valued-added vs Non-value added 2nd Pillar: WASTE Elimination - MUDA
  69. 69. CLOSEDMITTS Exercise Types of Waste Examples Location Complexity Labor Over-production Space Energy Defects Materials Idle Materials Time Transportation Safety Hazards Area: Date: Location: Conducted by:
  70. 70. The 3 Pillars of Kaizen
  71. 71. 3rd Pillar: Standard Operation Standard Operation -is the process of implementing and developing technical standards for a Consistent work sequence. Standard Operation maximize compatibility, interoperability, safety, repeatability, and quality. Standard Operation is one of the most powerful but least used lean tools. By documenting the current best practice, standardized work forms the baseline for kaizen or continuous improvement. As the standard is improved, it becomes the baseline for further improvements. Improving standardized work is a never-ending process.
  72. 72. Takt-Time Standard Work Sequence Standard Work In-Process 1 2 3 4 5 6 SWIP Basically, Standard Operation consists of three elements: 1.Takt time, which is the rate at which products must be made in a process to meet customer demand. 2.The Standard Work Sequence in which an operator performs tasks within takt time. 3.The Standard WIP (SWIP), including units in machines, required to keep the process operating smoothly. 3rd Pillar: Standard Operation
  73. 73. Net Operating TimeTakt Time = Customer Requirements *Time periods must be consistent (shift, day, week . . . ) 1. TAKT TIME The first element in developing Standard Operation is calculating Takt Time. Takt time is the pace at which a product is completed in a continuous flow production, timed to Customer Demand. Takt-time is calculated by:
  74. 74. Takt-time Calculation Example Shift: 9.5 Hours @ 60 Min/Hour = Breaks: 2 @ 30 minutes Meeting &5S : 30 minutes 570 - 60 - 30 Net operating time per shift Net Operating Time Per Shift: 480 Customer Requirements /shift Monthly requirements (19,200) # Working days/month (20) 19,200 20 Takt Time = Net Operating Time / Shift Customer Requirements / Shift 960 480 Min/shift 960 Units/day = 0.5 min/Unit 30 secs/Unit 1. TAKT TIME
  75. 75. Enablers for Takt-time Production Multi-skilled Operators Water Strider Cellular Factory Layout 1. TAKT TIME
  76. 76. 2: Standard Work Sequence The Objective of Standard Work Sequence: Explicitly defines the workers responsibilities by establishing a routine series of steps to be repeated for each piece. Determines the amount of time allowed to complete the sequence of steps. Standard work sequence is the order of actions must be performed within a given takt-time. The sequence may include valued added processes and non- valued activities, but represents the current best method for advancing a piece through the Manufacturing process.
  77. 77. Once a standard work sequence is established, operators need to understand and follow the routine work sequence. There three basic methods for motivating someone to follow any set of rules….. 1. Fear of penalty or punishment 2. Demonstrated Best Performance 3. Make it obvious and simple 2: Standard Work Sequence
  78. 78. Observe the As-Is Process • Takt time • Existing layout and material flow • Existing work sequence • Quality, safety, waste, ergonomics To establish a worker’s standard work sequence you must first understand the Status-Quo: 2: Standard Work Sequence
  79. 79. Existing Layout and Material Flow RM FG 2: Standard Work Sequence The first step to observing the as-is process requires mapping the existing area layout to identify all work locations for the process. Trace the flow of materials through the process, indicating the amount and location of idle inventory.
  80. 80. Existing Work Sequence B C A E RM FG D 2: Standard Work Sequence Document the existing work sequence for each operator:
  81. 81. Standard Work-in Process (SWIP) -the minimum number of pieces of in-process inventory required to produce to takt-time Rules for SWIP One piece at the boundaries between two operators. One piece at any machine which operates automatically, un- attended by the operator. When required for special processes like curing or cooling. Special Process SWIP = Process Time Takt Time 3. Standard Work In Process (SWIP)
  82. 82. 3.Standard Work In Process (SWIP) B A A = Auto M = Manual = WIP Takt time = 57 sec Standard WIP = units MM MM A A RM FG Special Process Turntable Cure Time = 280 Sec WIP = 5 9 Example
  83. 83. SWIP – Out-of Cell Special Process Example. A = Auto M = Manual Standard WIP = units Given: • One shift operation • 480 minutes / shift • Takt time = 360 sec M A RM FG M MM A A A Special process WIP = 480 x 60 ÷ 360 = 80 86 Special proces s 3.Standard Work In Process (SWIP)
  84. 84. Three factors that accounts the 3 Pillars Activities Three factors that accounts the 3 Pillars Activities of KAIZEN are; 3. Importance of training and creating a learning organization. 1. Visual management 2. The role of the Supervisor
  85. 85. 1.Visual management (Visual Control) Visual Controls will: Show how to do the job (standard operations). Show how things are used and where things are stored. Control inventory storage levels. Show production status. Indicate when people need help. Identify hazardous areas. Visual controls are for the people who work in the cell and those who support the cell. Two purposes of Visual control; 1.To prompt action (or control actions) and 2.To identify abnormalities.
  86. 86. 1.Visual management (Visual Control) •What the process is •Who the customers and suppliers are •What the deliverables are •Where and what resources are being used in the process •There is an effective measurement system in place Purpose: Visual Controls tell at a glance what and how we are doing. When someone walks into the work place they should be able to determine:
  87. 87. Examples of Visual Controls Identity Markers Shadow Boards Location Markers Quantity Markers Standard Methods Andon Kanban Performance Display Defect Display Personnel Board Signboards, name labels, photos, or shapes of items. Identify tool storage locations Tape strips, color coding, numbering. Signs indicating number (min/max), standard containers, number of spaces for items. Charts of standard cycle time and work sequence, standard procedures and flow charts Visual (lights, flags) and audible signals to draw immediate attention or help. Card, empty container, or space signaling that production or movement is authorized. Production schedule, quality, cost, safety, or improvement activities. Boards showing defective product (quality maps), Pareto charge, fish-bone diagrams Availability (in/out), assignment and location, cross-training status to plan.
  88. 88. Prompt attention required by fellow employees, supervisors, maintenance, engineers, water striders, and management who must respond immediately to Andon signals. 1.Visual management (Visual Control) Andon lights are used to call attention to abnormalities that must be addressed in order to maintain a continuous flow. Any andon signal must have a clearly defined escalating response process that identifies when is to respond to different conditions. If a problem cannot be resolved by the first responder the problem is escalated until it can be resolved.
  89. 89. The mechanic who is having a problem must turn on the andon light. The person responsible for answering the andon signal is responsible for turning of the light. It is poor discipline for a mechanic to turn on and off their own andon light. This behavior represents a lack of commitment to lean practices. 1.Visual management (Visual Control) If an Andon signal is ignored by the designated responder, soon the operator will simply stop using it. The Andon signals an abnormality, an opportunity to identify and eliminate a problem. The number of times an andon comes on is not important, but how quickly it goes off is!
  90. 90. Machine Abnormality Andon Material Resupply Andon Operator Status Andon Line Status Andon 1.Visual management (Visual Control)
  91. 91. 2. The role of the Supervisor in KAIZEN
  92. 92. Role of a Good Kaizen Supervisor (Team Leader) (extract from “Kaizen for the shop floor”) 2. The role of the Supervisor in KAIZEN Ideally have been a leader or co-leader in other Kaizen events. Must at least participated in one previous event. Have an awareness of lean production methods. Not dictatorial in his or her leadership style Understand participative management. Be able to be fair but firm, aggressive but friendly Be able to take control when necessary Be willing to be on the shop floor and not out of reach or in the office Table. A good Supervisor should have previous leadership experience, not necessarily only management. It can be experience as a scout leader, club presidents etc.
  93. 93. Ten Kaizen Events Rules (extract from “Kaizen Shop Floor Series”) 1)There is no rank among team members – one person, one vote 2)Keep an open mind to change 3)Change is good, more change is better 4)Maintain a positive attitude 5)Don’t blame anyone for anything 6)Respect one another 7)There is no such thing as a dumb question 8)Plans are only good if they can be implemented. Plans succeed only if the gains are sustained 9)There is no substitute for hard work 10)Just do it! Role of: Leader, Facilitator, Participant in Innovation Projects
  94. 94. Training is learning that is provided in order to improve performance on the present job. - Dr. Leonard Nadler 3. Importance of training and creating a learning organization. It is an activity that increases the capacity and willingness of individuals, groups, and organizations to acquire and productively apply new knowledge and skills. It empowers individuals, apply their knowledge to make changes for better.
  95. 95. 3. Importance of training and creating a learning organization.
  96. 96. 3. Importance of training and creating a learning organization. Training helps new recruits to perform assigned tasks effectively and helps existing employees to prepare for higher level jobs. It enables employees to keep in touch with latest developments to cope with changes in Continuous Improvements. It makes employees more versatile, mobile and flexible to the job demands to allow an employee gain acceptance and job satisfaction.
  97. 97. Innovation & Workshop Projects  Types of Innovation in Kaizen. Why Innovation? Degree of Innovation-the act of creating new products, processes, ideas, etc... Examples of Types of Innovation. Innovating Process using Typical Kaizen concepts (Lean methods) Phase 1: Pre-Planning for Innovation Phase 2: Execution - Innovation Week Role of Leader, Facilitator, Participant in Innovation Projects Innovation Projects Implementation using Kaizen Forms for: Daily and Weekly Report Outs Follow-up for further Innovation  
  98. 98. Types of Innovation Here is one way of looking at the different types of innovation. One type isn't necessarily better than another for a given occasion - just different. Types of Innovation in KAIZEN
  99. 99. Research shows that innovation is correlated with competitive positioning and financial performance to provide sustainable strategic value to: Increase revenues Decrease costs through increased efficiencies Reduce competitive and financial risk Create better positioning and performance outcomes Lead to higher levels of customer satisfaction Elevate employee behaviors and actions beyond that of competitors, which are not capable of being imitated by competitors Why Innovation
  100. 100. Degree of Innovation in Manufacturing
  101. 101. Degree of Innovation in Manufacturing
  102. 102. INCREMENTAL INNOVATION Component: Making an improvement on an existing product or service. example: Examples of Incremental Innovations Adding a camera feature to a cell phone; Increasing the displacement of an engine to increase horsepower and/or torque; Adding a new ingredient to a plastic formulation to increase its strength.
  103. 103. INCREMENTAL INNOVATION System: Improving service or the process that makes the product. example: Examples of Incremental Innovations Reducing the number of steps necessary to manufacture the cell phone; Increasing the speed of machining the engine block; Implementing a lower-cost process to manufacture and deliver less- than-bulk quantities of plastic compounds
  104. 104. RADICAL / NONLINEAR INNOVATION Component: Developing a new product based on an entirely new concept that didn't exist before; example: Examples of Radical/Non Linear Innovations The iPod (a case of "Invention is the mother of necessity", and a "gotta have it" product); Gasoline-electric hybrid and fuel cell-based automotive power trains; An entirely new polymer that does something existing ones couldn't, e.g., polycarbonate in the '60's: a virtually unbreakable, transparent, high heat material that enabled new applications for plastics.
  105. 105. RADICAL / NONLINEAR INNOVATION System/Business Concept: Introducing a new way of doing things. example: Wireless phone providers selling airtime, and providing cell phones at low prices for you to use their services on an ongoing basis. The establishment & growth of car-sharing services in cities or at colleges - for those who need one on a regular or occasional basis (an alternative to owning a car). Stereo lithography - a process for quickly creating a first product prototype by using 3D CAD data and liquid polymers to generate a part in minutes, vs. days or weeks. Examples of Radical/Non Linear Innovations
  106. 106. Innovation & Workshop Projects Innovating Process using Typical Kaizen concepts (Lean methods) Phase 1: Pre-Planning for Innovation Phase 2: Execution - Innovation Week Role of: Leader, Facilitator, Participant in Innovation Projects Innovation Projects Implementation using Kaizen Forms for: Daily and Weekly Report Outs Follow-up for further Innovation
  107. 107. Innovating Process using Typical Kaizen concepts (Lean methods)
  108. 108. Innovating Process using Typical Kaizen concepts (Lean methods)
  109. 109. Before the KAIZEN event Phase 1: Pre-Planning for Innovation Select the team members – obtain superior approval prior to selection Gather information necessary for the event 1.Event target, scope and procedures 2.Layouts, flow charts, process sheets 3.Cycle times versus takt time charts 4.Staffing goals Prepare the area for the event 1.Mark the boundaries of the area visibly 2.Use the materials and equipment checklist provided. Add anything you will need that is not included and gather the materials and equipment needed for the event. 3.Prepare the team kits 4.Follow the Kaizen Event Preparation Checklist, making assignments and insuring that everything is ready for the event in time
  110. 110. Kaizen Event Preparation Checklist – By Time Frame Time Frame Description Who Status Date 4 Weeks Before KAIZEN Select area for improvement and choose the Kaizen Leader. Process Owner Prepare Target and Scope Form that identifies Kaizen objectives. Kaizen Leader Identify “Key Metrics” to measure improvements on Progress/Results Form. Kaizen Leader Select team members and obtain approval for their participation. Kaizen Leader Meeting to review Target and Scope, and Progress/Results Sheet with Process Owner and Kaizen Promotion Office. Develop build-ahead plan if production will be affected during Kaizen week. Kaizen Leader Process Owner KPO Specialist Reserve a room or prepare an area for daily meetings and to display collected data. Kaizen Leader Select data collection team members and obtain approval for their participation for the weeks before the Kaizen Event. Kaizen Leader Walk through the area to familiarize data collection team with area and Kaizen objectives. Kaizen Leader Data Collection Team Identify and assign “Before Kaizen” data collection activities. Kaizen Leader Data Collection Team Phase 1: Pre-Planning for Innovation
  111. 111. Phase 2: Execution - Innovation Week During the event 1.1 Keep up to date on what everyone is doing 2.Chart takt time and cycle times during time studies 3.Coordinate preparation of final presentation After the event 1.Compile hard copy of the presentation and circulate it to management and anyone else who should have it 2.Complete a follow-p list, making assignments for completion of any outstanding steps. 3.Communicate with the next team leader about the experiences of this event
  112. 112. Phase 2: Execution - Innovation Week Time Frame Description Who Status Date Kaizen Week Daily Morning Review with Team Members to: Identify tasks to accomplish during day. Update and review Kaizen Newspaper. Kaizen Leader and Team Members JUST DO IT! Get to the Gemba and start making improvements. Prepare Cartoons to document improvement ideas. Team Members Update Progress Results Sheet. Assign tasks and direct sub-team activities Teach, coach and encourage team members. Review and update Kaizen Newspaper. Kaizen Leader, KPO Specialist. Daily review meeting with Management staff to review progress of improvements. •Present updated Progress/Results sheet and Kaizen Newspaper. •Present improvement cartoons, bar charts or other supporting data. Kaizen Leader, KPO Specialist, Management staff and visiting dignitaries Prepare for Final Report Out •Revise and update Progress/Results sheet and Kaizen newspaper. •Plan final report-out contents, materials for presentation, order and length of presentation. Kaizen Leader and KPO Specialist Prepare Final Report-out materials and practice presentation. Kaizen Leader and Team Members. Presentation of Final Report Out Kaizen Leaders and Team Members.
  113. 113. MORNING KICKOFF MEETING 1.Target & Scope 2. Progress Result Report List all current status data and the target for the week 3. Standard Work Comb.Sheet At least one for major process 4. Percent Loading Chart Takt time vs Cycle time. Each bar represent one operator/ process 5. Std. Work Sheet – People flow Show people travel i.e spaghetti chart 6. Std.Work Sheet – Product flow Show process flow, product travel and equipment utilization Percent Loading Chart (Bar Chart) Date: 31/3/03 - 4/4/03 Area: Core Area Team Leader: Mohd Noor Process Name: Find Core Remnant Model Number: 777 Cutting Core Model Name: 777 Scope Of Operation From: Core Store To: Core Area CYCLE TIME TO FIND CORE REMNANT 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 BEFORE KAIZEN DAY 1 DAY 2 DAY 3 DAY 4 DAY 5 DAY TIME(Sec) Target 100 sec Innovation Projects Implementation using Kaizen Forms Daily and Weekly Report Outs Date: Venue: Target: Problem statement: Kaizen target: Scope: List of members:
  114. 114. Innovation Projects Implementation using Kaizen Forms Daily Report Outs 1. Progress Result Report  Day to day progress 2. Kaizen Newspaper  Action items identified &  Daily closure Use any combination of chart to show what has been accomplished during the day • Standard work Sheet • Percent Loading • Standard Combination Sheet • Kaizen Improvement Cartoon Key points during daily report out • What effect Kaizen is having on goals • What was accomplished today • What is your plan for tomorrow • Any help needed Process: Takt Time: Date: Team Leader: Progress Cycles Metric Cost Before Target 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1 Inventory - 2 Cycle Time (10 cent per sec) 0.1 3 Crew Size (Productivity Gain) (RM 1,000.00 per crew) 1000 4 Space (RM300.00 per sq Ft) 300 5 Quality (Defects) - 6 5 S's Level of Excellence - 7 Visual Controls - 8 Set-up Time (10 cent per sec) 0.1 9 Lead Time (10 cent per sec) 0.1 10 NVA Tasks - 11 VA Tasks - 12 People Travel (10 cent per feet) 0.1 13 Product Travel (10 cent per feet) 0.1 14 Queues - 15 Safety - 16 Cost - 17 Volume (units/week) - Progress / Results Report Kaizen KAIZEN NEWSPAPER Process: Team Leader: Date: ITEM # PROBLEM CORRECTIVE ACTION STATUS PERSON RESPONSIBLE DUE DATE 1 2 3 4 5 6
  115. 115. Innovation Projects Implementation using Kaizen Forms Weekly Report Outs 1. Target & Scope 5. Standard Combination Sheet (After Kaizen) 2. Progress Result Report (Daily progress throughout the week) 6. Kaizen Improvement Cartoon 3. Standard Work Sheet – (1.Process flow before & after Kaizen 2.People flow after Kaizen) 7. Kaizen Newspaper (Items that still needs follow up) 4. Percent Loading Chart (Before & After Kaizen) 8. Lesson learned ( Issues or suggestions for future event to be more successful) Standard Work Combination Sheet Step Time # Operation/Process Manual Mach Walk 1 Target and scope 2 Hazli 2 Progress report out 2 Sommat 3 Kanban system 4 Hazli 4 Work instruction for block saw machine 2 Bashri 5 5S practice 2 Osnizal 6 Process improvement cartoon 3 Fauzi 7 Kaizen Newspaper 4 Hazli 8 9 10 Date: 8 - 12 JUL 2002 Team Leader: MOHD HAZLI Area:CORE AREATakt Time: 1200 SEC Ope. Time Product: CORE BLOCK SAW Process: 1 3 Requirements: 1 2 106 7 8 9 Manual Walking Automatic Wait Process: Takt Time: Date: Team Leader: Progress Cycles Metric Cost Before Target 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1 Inventory - 2 Cycle Time (10 cent per sec) 0.1 3 Crew Siz e (Productivity Gain) (RM 1,000.00 per crew) 1000 4 Space (RM300.00 per sq Ft) 300 5 Quality (Defects) - 6 5 S's Level of Excellence - 7 Visual Controls - 8 Set-up Time (10 cent per sec) 0.1 9 Lead Time (10 cent per sec) 0.1 10 NVA Tasks - 11 VA Tasks - 12 People Travel (10 cent per feet) 0.1 13 Product Travel (10 cent per feet) 0.1 14 Queues - 15 Safety - 16 Cost - 17 Volume (units/week) - Progress / Results Report Kaizen Process Improvement Process: Area: Date: Team Leader: Item # Problem Measures / Action Needed Results Before Kaizen After Kaizen Scope of Operations LAYUP ROOM CHAMFER S AW CUTTING QA TA BLE CUTTING SANDING CUTTING QA TABLE TABLE CHA MFE R SAW 163 ft PEOPLE TRAVELCUTTING CUTTING 51 ft PRODUCT TRA VEL A)REMNANT BEHIND TORRIT BOOTH CHAMFER SA W B)REMNANT AT CORE AREA CHAMFER S AW C)REMNANT UNDE R TABLE Quality Safety Standard Work # of pieces of Std. Takt Operator Check Precaution in Process Work-in-Process Time Number 19 Standard Work Sheet From: Core Store To: Core Area Model Number: 737/747/767/777 Model Name: Boeing Process Name: Mohd Noor Manager: Ku Mohd Soffi Date: 31/3/2003 - 4/4/2003 REMNANT RACK REMNANT RACK REMNANT RACK REMNANT RACK REMNANT RACK REMNANT RACK REMNANT RA CK CTT RACK CTT RACK CTT RACK DOWNDRAFT TABLE DOWNDRAFT TA BLE potting area Before kaizen B CC A B 1 2 3 KAIZEN NEWSPAPER Process: Team Leader: Date: ITEM # PROBLEM CORRECTIVE ACTION STATUS PERSON RESPONSIBLE 1 2 3 4 5 6 Percent Loading Chart (Bar Chart) Date: 31/3/03 - 4/4/03 Area: Core Area Team Leader: Mohd Noor Process Name: Find Core Remnant Model Number: 777 Cutting Core Model Name: 777 Scope Of Operation From: Core Store To: Core Area CYCLE TIME TO FIND CORE REMNANT 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 BEFORE KAIZEN DAY 1 DAY 2 DAY 3 DAY 4 DAY 5 DAY TIME(Sec) Target 100 sec Date: Venue: Target: Problem statement: Kaizen target: Scope: List of members:
  116. 116. After the event 1.Compile hard copy of the presentation and circulate it to management and anyone else who should have it 2.Complete a follow-p list, making assignments for completion of any outstanding steps. 3.Communicate with the next team leader about the experiences of this event Follow-up for further Innovation
  117. 117. A major innovation is a breakthrough that changes the rules of the game and the terms of competition. Kaizen & Innovation in Manufacturing
  118. 118. & The Trainer For further enquiries, please contact us: Iverson Associates Sdn Bhd No.52-1, First floor, Bayan Bay, Persiaran Bayan Indah, 11900 Bayan Lepas Penang. T: 04 641 2760, 638 3179 | F: 04 641 2761 E: sales-pg@iverson.com.my | W: www.iverson.com.my This training course is developed and conducted by IVERSON & its Trainer who is a certified Kaizen Leader driving Lean & Kaizen Improvement Projects and also a Consultant for LEAN with 30 over years of Hand-On Manufacturing exposure . We provide Technical Consulting services on TPM, Kaizen, Quick Changeover, Cellular system set up, Production Line Balancing, Factory Layout Planning and Small Group Activities. We also conduct Team Building & Lean Production Training Course Series.
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The Training is a 1 day course covering impartation knowledge of Kaizen and its associated Tools and; -application of Lean concepts to lead Kaizen Workshop/s with Innovation Projects for Change in a World Class Manufacturing Environment. This training aims to impart a systematic review on all the critical aspects of Lean use to; lead Kaizen workshop and presentation using Standardize Kaizen form and methodology with; Innovation to be competitive in the Global Business Environment. COURSE CONTENT Kaizen, its definition and Principles Kaizen definition, Innovation Definition Kaizen vs Innovation Characteristics of a Lean Factory Cellular Factory Layout Multi-skilled Operators 6S and Visual Control Kanban and Supermarkets Rapid Changeover Total Quality Approach Right-sized, flexible equipment Water Strider Moving Production Lines Total Productive Maintenance Continuous Improvement The 3 Pillars of Kaizen 1. 6S (5+1S) Housekeeping 2. Waste Elimination - Types of Waste CLOSEDMITT - Valued-added vs Non-value added 3. Standard Operation Three factors that accounts the 3 Pillars Activities. 1. Visual management, 2. The role of the supervisor, 3. Importance of training and creating a learning organization. Innovation & Workshop Projects Types of Innovation in Kaizen. Why Innovation? Degree of Innovation-the act of creating new products, processes, ideas, etc... Examples of Types of Innovation Innovating Process using Typical Kaizen concepts (Lean methods) Phase 1: Pre-Planning for Innovation Phase 2: Execution - Innovation Week Role of Leader, Facilitator, Participant in Innovation Projects Innovation Projects Implementation using Kaizen Forms for: Daily and Weekly Report Outs Follow-up for further Innovation  

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